Undergraduate Courses and Minor

The need for thoughtful, well-educated leaders in nonprofits and philanthropy is growing: nonprofits employ around 10% of the American workforce. There are nearly 2 million nonprofits in the U.S., with over $1 trillion in revenue and $4 trillion in assets. These new courses in Nonprofit Studies are open to all majors, and will equip you with the knowledge and hands-on experience needed to succeed in careers in foundations, human services, economic development, the arts, and the environment.
 
do well by doing good.
 
 
For more information about the MINOR in NONPROFIT STUDIES, visit:
 
 
SPRING 2014 COURSES ON THE NYC CAMPUS
 
AMS 396 “Internship in American Studies” CRN 22823
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Sarah Blackwood
DAY/TIME: Online
DESCRIPTION: Students must fulfill nonprofit/ civic internship to count towards minor in non profit studies. An internship is an assignment to a business, corporation, public agency, school, or other organization that provides on-the-job and pre-professional experience. Internships may be full-time or part-time and generally last for one semester. Students also participate in a seminar.
 
 
ANT 108 “Global Cultures and Local Identities” CRN 21775
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Judith Pajo, PhD
DAY/TIME: Wednesday 1:20 - 4:20pm
PLACE: NYC Campus
DESCRIPTION: This course focuses on the strategies of identity formation employed amid the global flows of migration, capital, and information.  It analyzes the benefits and risks involved in the increasingly rapid and transnational circulation of culture, products, and ideas in the “developed” and the “developing” world. The course introduces students to major anthropological debate on the politics of identity in the face of globalization. It explores the way people develop identities around the globe at the end of the 20th century.
 
 
CIS 102W “Web Design for Nonprofits” (Multiple CRNs)
INSTRUCTOR: Multiple instructors
DAY/TIME: Multiple times available
PLACE: NYC Campus
DESCRIPTION: This is a discipline-based course that affects an exciting and new learning experience for students, in implementing and enhancing actual Web sites that benefit local non-profit agencies. The students are introduced in class to the methods of designing Web sites in a non-profit paradigm and are involved in developing, implementing and enhancing the sites in the field, in teams that include clientele of the agencies.
 
 
FIN 680V/ FIN 360 “International Field Study: The Practice of Microfinance in India” CRN 22794
INSTRUCTOR: Professor PV Viswanath
DAY/TIME: Wednesday 5:40 - 8:30pm
PLACE: NYC Campus
PRE- AND POST-TRIP MEETING DATES: Feb. 5, Feb. 19, Feb. 26, Mar. 5, Apr. 2, Apr. 16.
TRIP DESTINATION: Mumbai and several locations in Kerala
TENTATIVE TRIP DATES: 3/14/2014-3/23/2014
DESCRIPTION: This international field study course will focus on the practice of microfinance in India. We will visit two different locales: one urban – Mumbai and one rural – the state of Kerala. In both places, we will visit microfinance institutions that are involved in bringing different kinds of financial services to people at the bottom of the pyramid – loans, savings vehicles, insurance, payment services etc. We will hear from the people running these institutions, as well as make field visits; students will thus get an opportunity to hear and see first-hand the issues involved in the financial lives of the poor. Since many aspects of the problems and solutions are society-specific, we will also make it a point to learn about their physical and social context. Cultural visits – many of them in beautiful locales – will thus have a dual function, both entertainment and educational.  Trip Cost: $3,500 in addition to tuition (approximate, and subject to change and fuel surcharge). Any required travel visas will be an additional cost. A $500 deposit is due by December 2, 2013. Total payment is due by January 31, 2014.
For more information, please contact Prof. P.V. Viswanath at pviswanath@pace.edu.
For information on a previous microfinancebased India travel course, go to http://webpage.pace.edu/pviswanath/class/680India/fin680d.html. Scholarships available: For further information and to apply online, visit www.pace.edu/lubin/travelscholarships.
 
 
MAR 356 “International Marketing Field Study” CRN 23373
INSTRUCTOR: TBA
DAY/TIME: Friday 1:20 - 2:15pm
PLACE: NYC Campus
PRE-TRIP CLASS MEETINGS: 2/7, 3/14, 4/11, AND 4/25.
TRIP DESTINATION: TBA
TRAVEL DATES: 5/26 - 6/5
POST-TRIP CLASS MEETING: TBA
DESCRIPTION: The International Marketing Field Study provides students with a unique opportunity to learn about business customs and practices in different cultures through intensive study and travel in a foreign country. Students will meet with foreign business managers, educators, and government officials to discuss contemporary issues and business practices. In addition, students will study the cultural values and norms of the country being visited and participate in various cultural events and activities. Prior to departure, students are required to have an approved research topic which will be developed during the field study. A research report incorporating the field experiences is due two weeks after the conclusion of the field study.  Travel Cost: $3,700. Includes: TBA.  Deposit of $500 due by December 2, 2013. Final payment due by January 31, 2014.  For further information, contact: TBA.
 
 
PJS 301 “Humanitarianism and International Aid Work” CRN 22135
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Emily Welty
DAY/TIME: Wednesday 6:10 - 9:00pm
PLACE: NYC Campus
DESCRIPTION: Many students are interested in international work or volunteering for NGOs abroad. What does it mean to “do good work overseas”? This class analyzes and explores humanitarianism and international peace-building and development work. What does it mean to be an aid worker? What are the ethics and best practices required to work in challenging environments during a conflict or disaster?
 
 
PAA 601 “Public Administration and its Environment” CRN 22110
INSTRUCTOR: TBA
DAY/TIME: Monday 11:30am - 1:30pm
PLACE: NYC Campus
DESCRIPTION: This course provides an introduction to the field of public administration, including its history as an academic discipline and a field of service. It focuses on the organization and structure of American national, state and local governments and examines their powers, responsibilities and functions in the federal system. The course emphasizes the impact of a changing political environment on the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government as they influence the development of public policy. Specific case examples illustrating the principles of public administration will be taken from government, health care, and nonprofit organizations. This graduate-level course can help you get a head start on a Master’s degree in Public Administration. To register, please contact Prof. Nancy Reagin at nreagin@pace.edu 
 
 
PAA 602 “Organizational Theory & Management” CRN 22613
INSTRUCTOR: TBA
DAY/TIME: Tuesday 11:30am -1:30pm
PLACE: NYC Campus
DESCRIPTION: This course examines organizations from three perspectives, as closed, natural and open systems. It will help students to understand better the relationship among organizational structure, organization functions, and individual and group behavior. Behavioral forces and their implications will be addressed as students are exposed to concepts of power, control and change within appropriate contexts. Leadership will be discussed from a situational perspective with emphasis on the complexity of the modern organization in the government, health care, and nonprofit sectors. Knowledge of organization theory will be used to enhance students’ understanding of management functions. This graduate-level course can help you get a head start on a Master’s degree in Public Administration. To register, please contact Prof. Nancy Reagin at nreagin@pace.edu
 
 
PAA 670 “The Not-for-Profit Sector” CRN 23322
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Betsy Bush
DAY/TIME: Tuesday 9:00am - 12:00pm
PLACE: NYC Campus
DESCRIPTION: This course examines the history of nonprofit organizations in the United States to develop a social perspective and a sense of the magnitude, scope and functions of the nonprofit sector. The course also looks at the relationship of the nonprofit sector to government and business. The course explores the theoretical basis on which social scientists have sought to understand the nonprofit sector in our economic, political and social environment. Issues shaping the future role of the nonprofit sector will be discussed. Required of all students in the nonprofit management track. This graduate-level course can help you get a head start on a Master’s degree in Public Administration. To register, please contact Prof. Nancy Reagin at nreagin@pace.edu
 
 
PAA 681 “Advanced Seminar for Not-for-Profit Management Issues” CRN 23621
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Rebecca Tekula
DAY/TIME: Meets first Thursday each Month 11:30 - 1:00pm
PLACE: NYC Campus
DESCRIPTION: This seminar focuses on advanced management topics of special interest to students in the nonprofit management track. Examples include board development, communication and public relations, and organization development strategies. This graduate-level course can help you get a head start on a Master’s degree in Public Administration. To register, please contact Prof. Nancy Reagin at nreagin@pace.edu.
 
 
PAA 683 “Seminar/ Lab in Social Entrepreneurship” CRN 23622
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Rebecca Tekula
DAY/TIME: Tuesday 6:10 - 9:00pm
PLACE: NYC Campus
DESCRIPTION: This course will provide an in-depth exploration of the emerging field of “social entrepreneurship” which has been succinctly described as using the tools present in a market-based economy to solve problems and create social value, as opposed to distributing profit to owners or shareholders. Students will examine the various forms and models of entrepreneurship, identify salient elements leading to success and failure, and study the vast implications of this new form of social innovation. This graduate-level course can help you get a head start on a Master’s degree in Public Administration. To register, please contact Prof. Nancy Reagin at nreagin@pace.edu
 
 
SOC 245 “Urban Planning” CRN 21837
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Michael Levine
DAY/TIME: Wednesday 1:20 - 4:20pm
PLACE: NYC Campus
DESCRIPTION: This course will address the history, theory and practice of urban planning. It will examine the physical planning tools, regulations and current professional practices in use in urban communities. Readings and assignments will concentrate on the physical, geographic and built environment of the city and will explore the relationship between the physical nature of urban communities and the equality of urban community life.
 
 
SOC 245 “Urban Planning” CRN 22415
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Michael Levine
DAY/TIME: Friday 1:20 - 4:20pm
PLACE: NYC Campus
DESCRIPTION: This course will address the history, theory and practice of urban planning. It will examine the physical planning tools, regulations and current professional practices in use in urban communities. Readings and assignments will concentrate on the physical, geographic and built environment of the city and will explore the relationship between the physical nature of urban communities and the equality of urban community life.
 
 
WS 296V “International Activist Politics: Global Feminist and Postcolonial Perspectives” CRN 23377
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Meghana V. Nayak, PhD
DAY/TIME: Thursday 12:15 - 3:15pm
PLACE: NYC Campus
DESCRIPTION: Are you interested in human rights and/or feminist advocacy work, particularly regarding global politics or the issues communities are facing around the world? Do you hope to someday work with the United Nations, an international organization, agency, or non-profit, or with transnational advocacy campaigns aimed to improve people’s lives in the world? Through a combination of empirical case studies and global, transnational, and post-colonial feminist theories as well as canonical post-colonial theory, we will examine the effectiveness of international and transnational advocacy. We will explore interactions between countries, advocacy networks, activist citizens, and international and local institutions, paying careful attention to gender, race, power relationships, colonialism, and class. Finally, we will assess how to create strategies to engender justice and peace.
 
 
WS 297S “Job Opportunities in Sexuality Education and Reproductive Justice in the Nonprofit Sector” (3 Credits; AOK 5 credit approval pending) CRN 23376
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Carolyn Chalker
DAY/TIME: Tuesday 6:10 - 9:00pm
PLACE: NYC Campus
DESCRIPTION: A vast array of nonprofit organizations are devoted to or include programs on sexuality policy and research, reproductive rights, abortion, contraception, gay, lesbian, transgender, and intersex issues. This course highlights internship and job opportunities in non-profit organizations that focus on or include sexuality and reproductive justice issues. Course materials from both scholarly and popular sources will broaden students’ knowledge on sexuality, abortion, contraception, and the medicalization of sexuality and will provide them with significant advantages when competing in this vibrant and dynamic job market.
 
 
WS 305 “Philanthropy on a Mission: Women and Change in the Non-Profit Sector (3 Credits) CRN 22525
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Marie Grynbal
DAY/TIME: Thursday 6:10 - 9:00pm
PLACE: NYC Campus
DESCRIPTION: Gender is an organizational issue and it affects both how we help women and families in need, and who helps them. Using the perspective of gender equity, the course will explore women’s impact on nonprofit organizations from leadership roles to work on the front lines. We will examine how gender, diversity and leadership are social constructions that can be transformed to maximize women’s contributions to the sector. Students will identify and analyze a specific nonprofit that has successfully addressed issues of gender equity internally and externally through its program repertoire. They will also explore several practice areas such as program design and management, planning, fundraising issues and program evaluation for non-profits.
 
 
Helene & Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship
212-346-1028
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New York, NY 10038
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