Dyson Scholars in Residence Program on the Pleasantville Campus

Want to try a unique Dyson College experience? Then consider applying for this year-long Living-Learning Community in Elm Hall on the Pleasantville Campus.

You’ve had the opportunity to read, study, and discuss ideas in the traditional classroom. This program offers something more: the chance to join a community of diverse students who live together in a residence hall, take special seminars that explore important ideas and issues, do hands-on research to develop a community service project, build friendships with dedicated peers, and find a mentor in a committed faculty member who spends time with the community in the residence hall.

Dyson Scholars in Residence students live together in semi-suite accommodations in Elm Hall, creating a vibrant learning community within the residence hall.  This signature academic experience supports Dyson College’s mission to provide its majors with opportunities to expand their intellectual landscape, to stimulate their scholarly curiosity, and to engage in hands-on experiences blended with academic learning. Students will live in a special block of semi-suite rooms in Elm Hall and fall and spring seminar courses will meet in the adjoining lounge space.  In addition to course work, students will have the opportunity to create and run their own residence hall-based programming such as films, speakers, community dinners and local outings.

Who can apply? This program is open to Pleasantville campus students with Dyson College majors and to undecided students who are considering Dyson College majors.

Student Testimonials

When I initially applied for the DSIR program, I was looking for an environment where I’d feel a part of a community. It’s safe to say that the Dyson Scholars in Residence Program has given me that. I am truly happy that I am a member. It’s such a unique experience to live and work with your classmates. I think in a very natural way, we’ve grown very comfortable with each other. This new camaraderie definitely helped us when it came time to do our final presentations. What I loved is that hours before class, many of us met to practice and encourage each other. I think that’s very special.
Imani

Along with the content we go over in class, I thoroughly enjoyed how I lived in the same hall as my classmates. Living near my peers benefitted me in more ways than one. If I had trouble understanding an assignment or needed feedback on something, I had people all around me who understood and were willing to help. And, creating friendships with my classmates outside of the classroom helped a lot when it came to my final presentation towards the end of the semester: I felt more comfortable in the class because I was no longer just talking to my classmates, I was surrounded by friends.   
Gabrielle

All in all, I’m coming out of my DSIR experience as a better person. What I learned goes beyond academics. I learned skills from my experiences in this program that will serve me for my life after college and whatever will come after that; and I’ve already started to see the benefits.
Jared

Expand for more student testimonials ▼

“I applied initially to become involved in something new and different, but I never imagined how much it would positively impact me! I was able to become a part of a real community with students who were once strangers to me, but who are now some of my closest friends.”
Samantha

“It helps having everyone in your Residence Hall section  have the same class because we often come together to discuss assignments. It changed my experience in the Residence Hall because last year I did not know anybody who lived around me. Now, we all take the same class and learn together.”
Victoria

“I went from not being the most social person to knocking right on classmates doors to ask them for homework help. This living-learning community has given me a sense of belonging. As a mentor, Dr. Collins gave us a chance to widen our horizons and find a place within ourselves that we didn’t know we had!”
 Brittany


Academic Year 2019-2020

What courses do I take as part of this program?

Students take 6 credits as part of the program: a 3-credit Fall seminar (choice of 2 different topics) and a 3-credit Spring seminar.  All courses will meet on Monday nights from 6:10-9:00 PM in Elm Hall.  Students must be registered in both courses to remain in the program. In both the fall and spring semesters, students work on individual and group projects that they present to the Dyson College community in the spring. Withdrawing from the program’s courses will mean leaving the Elm Hall accommodations.

What are DSIR Alumnae/i
up to?

Jaquay Dee-Hardmon & Dulce Garcia '19

"DSIR taught me how to prepare myself for the life I want. I have always been a shy person, and being a part of DSIR really cracked open my shell. It changed my way of thinking and showed me options that are not far out of my reach. Now, I have studied abroad in Paris!" Read more...

Blake Rozelle '20

"In spring 2018, I enrolled in the travel documentary course to Puerto Rico, the focus of which has been the aftermath of Hurricane Maria." Read more...

What is the topic of the Dyson Scholars in Residence for 2019-2020?

Fall 2019 Seminars

Note: Students can apply for both seminars by ranking which is their first and second choice

ENG 223A: Creating a Good Life (AOK 4)

Led by Dr. Jane Collins of the English and Modern Language Studies Department, this course explores the intersection of research on creativity, productivity, success and happiness. Students will explore the idea of how creativity works in all aspects of professional life—whether you are a small business owner creating a new product, or a writer creating a novel or a scientist creating an experiment.  Situated in a culture that privileges the idea of an “American Dream,” our course materials (readings, film and other media) will look at how popular culture expresses ideas about what a “good life” entails.  We will use creative writing techniques to generate memoirs, stories, personal essays and multi-media works that investigate, challenge and further those American ideals. Each student will use creative techniques and strategies for self-discovery and to generate their own roadmap or path towards a happy future.

ENV 245: Environmental Justice (AOK 2 and 5)

Led by Dr. Michael Finewood, of the Environmental Studies Department, this course explores the idea that poor and marginalized communities endure more environmental risks than others. The term environmental justice emerged to describe efforts to address environmental inequality and the conditions that produce environmental injustices. This course looks at the field of environmental justice, from its historic roots to its diverse strands. We will consider the frameworks of determining what an environmental injustice is, how it occurs, who is impacted, and strategies of resistance. We will read case studies that trace diverse ways of understanding environmental injustice, such as environmental racism, toxic exposure, conservation exclusion, labor conditions, access to resources, and more. Students will also study local case studies and develop a project on a local issue.

Spring 2020 Seminar

INT 200Q: Dyson Scholars in Residence Seminar (AOK1 and Writing Enhanced)

Based on our Fall semester findings, each class of scholars will create a hands-on service project for the Spring semester to consider the role of “giving back” in building a meaningful life.

Applications accepted after February 5, 2019
Access the application via your Pace Portal under My Housing.

Applications must be submitted by February 25, 2019.

Contact Dr. Jane Collins at jcollins@pace.edu if you have any questions.