Fall 2018

 

Scroll to the news in Science, Humanities, Art, or Social Sciences

 

Top News

 

DYSON ALUMNI ARE POLITICAL TRAILBLAZERS

Following the 2018 midterm elections, two Dyson College graduates are poised to make history. New York State Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins, a Dyson double alumna, successfully won her bid for reelection and she is now set to become the first black woman—and the first woman—to lead either legislative chamber once confirmed as State Senate Majority Leader. Additionally, Charles Fall '14, Master of Public Administration, will be the first Muslim—and first African American—to represent Staten Island in Albany.

 

PACE STUDENTS ADDRESS THE UNITED NATIONS

Sydney Korman ‘21, Political Science, Women’s and Gender Studies, and Terrie Soule ’19, Peace and Justice Studies, delivered a statement to the United Nations General Assembly calling for greater participation of youth, women, survivors of violence and people from the 'Global South,' (Africa, Latin America, Asia, and the Middle East), in peace and security policymaking. "Disarmament education can and should emphasize the humanitarian, human rights and environmental consequences of arms, militarism and armed conflict…empower the next generation of leaders to seek peace and alternative conflict resolution processes rather than relying on violence and war,” they said. Last year, Korman and Soule worked with professors Welty and Bolton and the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), which won the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize. Read more.

 

DYSON PROFS LAUDED FOR EXCEPTIONAL WORK

Three Dyson professors have been recognized for their outstanding work. Assistant Professor of Photography Inbal Abergil was awarded grant funding from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, established to provide financial assistance to artists through Lee Krasner, a leading abstract expressionist painter and widow of Jackson Pollock. Additionally, Assistant Professor of Psychology Lisa Rosenthal was honored with the Division 1 George Miller award from the American Psychological Association for her work on intersectionality, the ways in which different forms of social stratification intersect and connect, and Professor of Criminal Justice Kimberly Collica-Cox was selected as the first recipient of the “Ken Peak Innovations in Teaching Award,” from the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences.

 

Pace Featured in UN Disarmament Report

A report on nuclear disarmament education from UN Secretary-General António Guterres highlights the significant contributions from Pace University students and faculty. According to the July 2018 report, “Pace University plays a globally recognized leading role in disarmament education ..." Read more about Pace's involvement in Nobel Peace Prize-winning efforts, and learn about the International Disarmament Institute here.

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Science

 

THEY'RE HIRED! ALL ENV ’18 GRADS REPORT EMPLOYMENT

Dyson College’s 2018 class of MA, Environmental Policy graduates has reached 100 percent job placement success. Alumni have taken positions supporting local nonprofit organizations and politicians. Their achievements stand as a testament to Pace University’s mission to provide Opportunitas, and the ongoing focus on student success outcomes. This marks the inaugural class of graduates for the program, established in 2016. Read more about what these alumni are doing.

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Humanities

 

DYSON VET EARNS A+E FELLOWSHIP

Gerald Olvera ’18, Media, Communications, and Visual Arts, has received the Sgro Fellowship for Veterans in Media Technology from A+E Networks, a competitive, 18-month program for veterans to enter careers in media production. Gerald, who joined the US Navy just weeks before the 9/11 attacks, came to Pace after serving around the world for 11 years. “The resources gained from this fellowship will allow me to confidently pursue my next career endeavor, becoming an editor, and eventually a teacher,” he says.

 

KAVANAUGH-FORD HEARING IN THE CLASSROOM

Satish Kolluri, associate professor of communication studies, discusses in The Chronicle of Higher Education how the Kavanaugh-Ford hearing provides a unique learning opportunity for his students. He streamed the September 27 hearings in his political satire and public speaking classes and integrated discussion during session breaks. “I basically threw the lesson plans for the day out of the window, and I decided that this is much more important,” Kolluri said.

 

PROF PENS BOOK ON DEMOCRACY & JOURNALISM

Seong Jae Min, associate professor of communication studies, authored As Democracy Goes, So Does Journalism: Evolution of Journalism in Liberal, Deliberative, and Participatory Democracy, Lexington Books, June 2018. The book explores the symbiotic relationship between democracy and journalism in an engaging historical narrative and attempts to answer the vital questions facing journalism today, namely its identities, functions, and relationship to democracy and the good life.

 

PROF AWARDED GRANTS FOR ENERGY DOC

Media, Communications, and Visual Arts prof Melanie LaRosa is one step closer to completing her documentary film project, “How to Power a City.” She has received grant funding from the Puffin Foundation, which provides financial support for arts projects by underrepresented creators; the Yip Harburg Foundation, which funds projects that promote social justice and equality; and the Solutions Journalism Network, supporting reporting and investigation of the response to social problems. The film showcases clean energy efforts at the grassroots level, and Pace students, including Irene Mercado ’17, Nick Ostrander ’16, and Anthony Parker ’15, have been involved in filming, research, writing and website development.

 

PACE FILMMAKERS REMEMBER HURRICANE MARIA

Commemorating the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Maria, the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance will present a free panel discussion and bilingual (English/Spanish) with subtitles screening of Puerto Rico: Hope in the Dark, an award-winning Pace docs project. The film is a look at resilience in aftermath of the storm. RSVP to attend the screening, scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 23, 2pm at the Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art and Storytelling. Additionally, the film will air on WTTN, the Chicago PBS affiliate.

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Arts

 

PPA WELCOMES STANDOUT INCOMING CLASS

The Pace School of Performing Arts welcomed 176 students to the incoming class of 2022, after receiving a record 3,700 applications from hopefuls hailing from six continents, including 49 states, and Puerto Rico. “I am impressed by the immense talent of the students and the drive and focus they have demonstrated to get to this point,” said Jorge Cacheiro, executive director, Pace School of Performing Arts. Pace was recently ranked by Playbill in their top ten most represented colleges on Broadway in the 2018–19 season. Onstage Blog included PPA in their national rankings, with the Musical Theater major ranked number four in the country, its Acting major number six, Commercial Dance major number 16, and the Production and Design major number 23. Broadway World reported on the incoming class.

 

PACE NAMED AMID TOP MUSICAL THEATER BFAs

OnStage Blog has listed Pace University no. 4 among the “The Top 25 BFA Musical Theater Programs for 2018-19.” The competitive program is praised for its attention to the business, as well as the art, of performing. Rankings are based on a variety of factors. Read more.

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Social Sciences

 

PACE STUDENTS MAKE THEIR VOICES HEARD

During the recent midterm elections, Pace  University students took action, and the media took notice. News 12 reported on a group  of students who worked to get more of their peers registered, and interviewed Julia Ferrugio '22, Applied Psychology and Human Relations, on election day about her support for LGBT rights and  women’s rights. News 12 also spoke with Florence L. '22,  Global Studies, who expressed her thoughts on President Trump’s plan to reverse transgender identity, and being trans in America, “I'm  proud of being trans because I don't think there's another option. It took a  lot of people a very long time to get us to where we are now,” she said.

 

MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING CACREP APPROVED

Pace has earned accreditation for its MS and PhD Mental Health Counseling programs from The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), following a rigorous external review and self-assessment. Only 25 institutions in New York State offer a master or doctoral mental health counseling program with CACREP accreditation. Both programs are housed in Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. The master’s program is the first in Westchester County and sixth in New York City to receive CACREP accreditation in mental health counseling and the PhD was the first doctoral degree of its kind in New York State when it launched in 2013 and is the only program in the New York metropolitan area and the third in New York State to receive CACREP accreditation.

 

PROF WINS NATIONAL CONFUCIUS ESSAY COMP.

Anna Shostya, associate professor of economics and assistant chair of Economics NYC, won the People-to-People Award, a national essay competition organized by the Confucius Institute U.S. Center. She was among 10 honorees at the 2018 Confucius Institute National Honors Gala in Washington, D.C. on September 15, 2018. Shostya’s award-winning essay, “My Confucius Institute Story,” recalls a trip she took with a group of Dyson students to Shanghai and Beijing for an intensive two-week faculty-led study abroad program, organized by the Pace Confucius Institute. The transformational experience inspired a number of her students to pursue global careers.

 

MPA GRAD WINS DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY

Charles Fall ’14, MPA, has won New York’s Democratic primary on Sept. 13, emerging over two challengers in an open race to represent Staten Island’s North Shore in the state assembly. There’s no Republican running against the 29-year-old, which guarantees him the seat in the November general election. Read more.

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