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Human Resources

Staff Mentoring Program

The purpose of Pace University’s staff mentoring program is to foster professional development and career growth while building cross-functional networks across the University. The program will pair early- and mid-career staff members (protégés) with higher-level staff members (mentors), in a formal mentorship program over the duration of six months. (Pilot program will run from June 2018 to December 2018).

Roles and requirements are as follows:

Mentor: Draws upon their knowledge, skill set, and personal experience to provide guidance and feedback while facilitating the personal growth and development of a less experienced protégé.

Requirements:

  • Assistant Director level and above
  • At Pace for a minimum of 12 months
  • Willing to commit to being a mentor for the full duration of the pilot program
  • Be available for a minimum of five substantial discussions, with at least two of these being in person, over the six-month period.

Protégé: Takes an active role in the mentoring relationship and has the primary responsibility for their own learning and development.

Requirements:

  • Any staff member who would benefit from the mentoring relationship
  • At Pace for a minimum of 12 months
  • Willing to commit to being a protégé for the full duration of the pilot program
  • Be available for a minimum of five substantial discussions, with at least two of these being in person, over the six-month period.

Handbooks

Forms and Guides

Resources

Resources and Related Links

Ideas for Mentoring Activities (PDF)

JumpStart Inc.: A non-profit based in Ohio, they provide growth opportunities, job development, education and information to aid in the development of the local economy.

The Leadership Effect: Offers customized programs and consulting designed to facilitate for organizational and leadership challenges.

Management Mentors: For over 25 years, this company has been helping organizations implement successful corporate mentoring programs.

University of North Carolina Chapel HillWhat Makes a Good Mentor


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