Anasthasia Agyemang

The Youth Leader
Former Pace University student, Anasthasia Agyemang

Whether it be through helping set up an after school program for the Mid-Bronx Council in the Bronx to working with the Global Youth Leaders Academy in Washington, DC, to conducting research in Ghana as part of a Boren Fellowship, and currently serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in the Republic of Georgia, Anasthasia Agyemang ’16 has been changing the lives of youth around the world.

As part of the Peace Corps, Agyemang currently works at the Sagarejo Municipality Youth House, a local government youth house which provides informal education to children and youth ages 6–17. Working both with the youth as well the staff, she builds capacity for the organization by training the staff on the use of computers, project design, and grant writing, and mentors and trains youth on various issues such as reproductive health, personal hygiene, and civic education. Under her leadership, the youth house has seen a significant increase in the number of youth that take part in their services—averaging about 50 youth each week, compared to the 20–25 that visited when she first started. Also a project manager for the Self-Esteem through Fitness and Leadership (SELF) Summer Camp, Agyemang is providing opportunities for approximately 50 Georgian teenage girls to develop leadership and self-confidence.

You’ve dedicated your career to helping youth. Can you talk about how that started and what continues to power you forward?

My work with youth started from church. I was the youth leader at my local church for about five years and working with them gave me so much joy and fulfilment. However, I never thought it would be my career path until I attended a conference in Malaysia as one of the US youth ambassadors. I realized that my passion was to be a young leader and I wanted to motivate others to do the same. Since then I have always looked for opportunities in that avenue.

You were the first-ever Pace University student to win a Boren Fellowship. How did it feel to be selected?

I found out I was the first after I got the award. It was overwhelming, and getting messages from the provost and the president at the time was just incredible.

Was the work you did part of your Pace research project on how college students are using social media for political participation? What were some important things you took from this experience?

The work was part of my capstone and I received a lot help from the Pace faculty. I am originally from Ghana but through this research I saw the country under a different light. I worked with politicians, professors, and students during this project and all these people were willing to share their experiences with me. I met student political leaders who were committed to fight for their country at all costs and that challenged me to do better.

What led you to the Peace Corps? Do you have any memorable moments you can share?

One of my Boren Fellowship colleagues was a Peace Corps volunteer in Madagascar and she shared most of her experiences with me. I became curious about it and researched more about it. So I decided to apply for it. I love to travel and learn different cultures. I can tell you that I am not disappointed. There are very few people of color in Georgia so the people get very happy to see diverse people and try to interact with us most times and they are very happy when you can speak the language. One of my memorable moments was when a kid ran after to take a selfie with me in the rain.

What has been your most life-changing experience or accomplishment thus far in your career?

Being in Georgia has been a total life-changing experience. There’s never a dull moment and each day brings its own special moments. I have the opportunity to meet some wonderful people, eat different foods, and seen beautiful landscapes.

What are you hoping to accomplish in the next five, ten, even twenty years?

I have started working on getting a PhD in International Development. It is my hope to work with one the international development organizations, start a family, and also teach at a University.

Former Pace University student, Anasthasia Agyemang

Whether it be through helping set up an after school program for the Mid-Bronx Council in the Bronx to working with the Global Youth Leaders Academy in Washington, DC, to conducting research in Ghana as part of a Boren Fellowship, and currently serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in the Republic of Georgia, Anasthasia Agyemang ’16 has been changing the lives of youth around the world.

As part of the Peace Corps, Agyemang currently works at the Sagarejo Municipality Youth House, a local government youth house which provides informal education to children and youth ages 6–17. Working both with the youth as well the staff, she builds capacity for the organization by training the staff on the use of computers, project design, and grant writing, and mentors and trains youth on various issues such as reproductive health, personal hygiene, and civic education. Under her leadership, the youth house has seen a significant increase in the number of youth that take part in their services—averaging about 50 youth each week, compared to the 20–25 that visited when she first started. Also a project manager for the Self-Esteem through Fitness and Leadership (SELF) Summer Camp, Agyemang is providing opportunities for approximately 50 Georgian teenage girls to develop leadership and self-confidence.

You’ve dedicated your career to helping youth. Can you talk about how that started and what continues to power you forward?

My work with youth started from church. I was the youth leader at my local church for about five years and working with them gave me so much joy and fulfilment. However, I never thought it would be my career path until I attended a conference in Malaysia as one of the US youth ambassadors. I realized that my passion was to be a young leader and I wanted to motivate others to do the same. Since then I have always looked for opportunities in that avenue.

You were the first-ever Pace University student to win a Boren Fellowship. How did it feel to be selected?

I found out I was the first after I got the award. It was overwhelming, and getting messages from the provost and the president at the time was just incredible.

Was the work you did part of your Pace research project on how college students are using social media for political participation? What were some important things you took from this experience?

The work was part of my capstone and I received a lot help from the Pace faculty. I am originally from Ghana but through this research I saw the country under a different light. I worked with politicians, professors, and students during this project and all these people were willing to share their experiences with me. I met student political leaders who were committed to fight for their country at all costs and that challenged me to do better.

What led you to the Peace Corps? Do you have any memorable moments you can share?

One of my Boren Fellowship colleagues was a Peace Corps volunteer in Madagascar and she shared most of her experiences with me. I became curious about it and researched more about it. So I decided to apply for it. I love to travel and learn different cultures. I can tell you that I am not disappointed. There are very few people of color in Georgia so the people get very happy to see diverse people and try to interact with us most times and they are very happy when you can speak the language. One of my memorable moments was when a kid ran after to take a selfie with me in the rain.

What has been your most life-changing experience or accomplishment thus far in your career?

Being in Georgia has been a total life-changing experience. There’s never a dull moment and each day brings its own special moments. I have the opportunity to meet some wonderful people, eat different foods, and seen beautiful landscapes.

What are you hoping to accomplish in the next five, ten, even twenty years?

I have started working on getting a PhD in International Development. It is my hope to work with one the international development organizations, start a family, and also teach at a University.