John Vincent “VINNIE” Monaco

The Army Scientist
Former Pace University student, John Vincent “VINNIE” Monaco

The US Army’s brain-like computers are one key closer to cracking codes, thanks to the work of Pace alumnus and adjunct professor Vinnie Monaco, PhD, ’12, ’13, ’15. 

Since arriving for his freshman year in 2008, Monaco’s impact on the University has been undeniably extraordinary. His many accomplishments and research breakthroughs in computer science have been featured in Pace Magazine; the local newspaper The Journal News; and even on the cover of Westchester Magazine, just to name a few. In 2011, Monaco was selected for the highly competitive and prestigious Information Assurance Scholarship Program by the US Department of Defense.

Over the past 10 years, Monaco has made a lasting impression on countless fellow Setters. He’s developed strong connections with many faculty members, including Computer Science Professor Charles Tappert, PhD, who has been a major influence on Monaco and his research and served as his master’s thesis advisor. Tappert, who noted that a master’s thesis is reserved for only the best and brightest in the program, declared that Monaco “is the best student that we’ve had in the Seidenberg School, certainly as long as I’ve been here.”

While working toward his PhD in 2014, Monaco’s work in behavioral biometrics received national acclaim—he received first place in the Second Eye Movement Verification and Identification Competition, part of the International Join Conference on Biometrics held in Clearwater, Florida. Monaco notes that this type of work can prove instrumental in the nebulous world of online test-taking, and help counter plagiarism, identity fraud, and other forms of cheating. 

More recently, with PhD in hand, Monaco was recognized as “Runner-up Neuromorph of the Year” at the 2016 Telluride Neuromorphic Cognition Engineering Workshop, in 2017 received the Best Paper award at the 50th IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS), out of 1339 paper submissions, and in 2018 will present on keylogging side channels at the 39th IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy. He even had his first patent for a universal keyboard published in 2018.

This work has served him well in his current position at the US Army, where he serves as a Research Laboratory computer scientist. While in this role, Monaco discovered a way to leverage emerging brain-like computer architectures for a theoretic problem known as integer factorization. If that last sentence reads like a foreign language, it’s because Monaco’s skill set isn’t one that’s easy to come by—something that those who have worked with him are well aware of! 

Amidst all his commitments in his full-time role, Monaco remains involved in the Pace Community, serving as an adjunct professor at the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. While he’s not revealing the computational secrets of the US Army in class, we’re thrilled that he’s sharing his secrets to success for the next generation of Seidenberg superstars.

Former Pace University student, John Vincent “VINNIE” Monaco

The US Army’s brain-like computers are one key closer to cracking codes, thanks to the work of Pace alumnus and adjunct professor Vinnie Monaco, PhD, ’12, ’13, ’15. 

Since arriving for his freshman year in 2008, Monaco’s impact on the University has been undeniably extraordinary. His many accomplishments and research breakthroughs in computer science have been featured in Pace Magazine; the local newspaper The Journal News; and even on the cover of Westchester Magazine, just to name a few. In 2011, Monaco was selected for the highly competitive and prestigious Information Assurance Scholarship Program by the US Department of Defense.

Over the past 10 years, Monaco has made a lasting impression on countless fellow Setters. He’s developed strong connections with many faculty members, including Computer Science Professor Charles Tappert, PhD, who has been a major influence on Monaco and his research and served as his master’s thesis advisor. Tappert, who noted that a master’s thesis is reserved for only the best and brightest in the program, declared that Monaco “is the best student that we’ve had in the Seidenberg School, certainly as long as I’ve been here.”

While working toward his PhD in 2014, Monaco’s work in behavioral biometrics received national acclaim—he received first place in the Second Eye Movement Verification and Identification Competition, part of the International Join Conference on Biometrics held in Clearwater, Florida. Monaco notes that this type of work can prove instrumental in the nebulous world of online test-taking, and help counter plagiarism, identity fraud, and other forms of cheating. 

More recently, with PhD in hand, Monaco was recognized as “Runner-up Neuromorph of the Year” at the 2016 Telluride Neuromorphic Cognition Engineering Workshop, in 2017 received the Best Paper award at the 50th IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS), out of 1339 paper submissions, and in 2018 will present on keylogging side channels at the 39th IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy. He even had his first patent for a universal keyboard published in 2018.

This work has served him well in his current position at the US Army, where he serves as a Research Laboratory computer scientist. While in this role, Monaco discovered a way to leverage emerging brain-like computer architectures for a theoretic problem known as integer factorization. If that last sentence reads like a foreign language, it’s because Monaco’s skill set isn’t one that’s easy to come by—something that those who have worked with him are well aware of! 

Amidst all his commitments in his full-time role, Monaco remains involved in the Pace Community, serving as an adjunct professor at the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. While he’s not revealing the computational secrets of the US Army in class, we’re thrilled that he’s sharing his secrets to success for the next generation of Seidenberg superstars.