Shaki Kar

The Fait Fellow
Former Pace University student, Shaki Kar

MS in Information Systems student Shaki Kar ’19 was one of five students in the United States to be awarded the first-ever Foreign Affairs IT (FAIT) Fellowship in 2017. The program, operated by the Washington Center for Academic Internships and managed and funded by the US Department of State, offers outstanding students interested in IT-related degrees the opportunity to pursue careers in foreign service.

“I’m highly excited about receiving the fellowship because I look forward to serving my country by enhancing information resource management and communications systems security, and ensuring transparent, interconnected diplomacy, while incorporating new technologies for the advancement of US foreign policy,” said Kar.

In a letter to Pace President Marvin Krislov, the Washington Center’s President Christopher Norton notes that “the fellowship is designed to attract outstanding individuals from all ethnic, racial, and social backgrounds who have an interest in pursuing a foreign service career in IT with the US Department of State.”

“After a very competitive application, interview, and clearance process,” adds Norton, “we are very pleased that Shaki Kar has been selected into the inaugural class of the FAIT 2017 Fellowship program.”

During this two-year program, students complete two summer internships with the State Department: one in the US and the other overseas, receive personalized mentoring and professional development opportunities, and after graduation and completion of the program are guaranteed employment as an Information Management Specialist (IMS) with the foreign service for five years.

“Information Management Specialists serve their country by maintaining secure, reliable IT tools and resources to ensure that Foreign Service Officers, federal agencies, and non-government partners can promote diplomacy while serving overseas,” explains Kar. “Information Management Specialists gain experiences that few other IT professions offer, including the reward of living in a foreign country while experiencing different cultures and helping to protect US interests abroad.”

“This is a very exciting opportunity for Shaki,” wrote Norton, “and we know your university must be very proud.”

“The experiences and opportunities that entail from a fellowship like this are potentially career and life-altering,” adds Seidenberg School Dean Jonathan Hill, DPS. “We are thrilled for Shaki and very much look forward to supporting him in his studies and seeing where this exciting journey takes him.”

Former Pace University student, Shaki Kar

MS in Information Systems student Shaki Kar ’19 was one of five students in the United States to be awarded the first-ever Foreign Affairs IT (FAIT) Fellowship in 2017. The program, operated by the Washington Center for Academic Internships and managed and funded by the US Department of State, offers outstanding students interested in IT-related degrees the opportunity to pursue careers in foreign service.

“I’m highly excited about receiving the fellowship because I look forward to serving my country by enhancing information resource management and communications systems security, and ensuring transparent, interconnected diplomacy, while incorporating new technologies for the advancement of US foreign policy,” said Kar.

In a letter to Pace President Marvin Krislov, the Washington Center’s President Christopher Norton notes that “the fellowship is designed to attract outstanding individuals from all ethnic, racial, and social backgrounds who have an interest in pursuing a foreign service career in IT with the US Department of State.”

“After a very competitive application, interview, and clearance process,” adds Norton, “we are very pleased that Shaki Kar has been selected into the inaugural class of the FAIT 2017 Fellowship program.”

During this two-year program, students complete two summer internships with the State Department: one in the US and the other overseas, receive personalized mentoring and professional development opportunities, and after graduation and completion of the program are guaranteed employment as an Information Management Specialist (IMS) with the foreign service for five years.

“Information Management Specialists serve their country by maintaining secure, reliable IT tools and resources to ensure that Foreign Service Officers, federal agencies, and non-government partners can promote diplomacy while serving overseas,” explains Kar. “Information Management Specialists gain experiences that few other IT professions offer, including the reward of living in a foreign country while experiencing different cultures and helping to protect US interests abroad.”

“This is a very exciting opportunity for Shaki,” wrote Norton, “and we know your university must be very proud.”

“The experiences and opportunities that entail from a fellowship like this are potentially career and life-altering,” adds Seidenberg School Dean Jonathan Hill, DPS. “We are thrilled for Shaki and very much look forward to supporting him in his studies and seeing where this exciting journey takes him.”