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ABC News featured Pace Dyson Professor Kimberly Collica-Cox in "Coronavirus Closings: NY, NJ schools and universities closed amid COVID-19 outbreak"

03/12/2020

ABC News featured Pace Dyson Professor Kimberly Collica-Cox in "Coronavirus Closings: NY, NJ schools and universities closed amid COVID-19 outbreak"

Michelle Charlesworth reports on Pace University reverting to online learning amid coronavirus fears.

School closings are following the coronavirus outbreak that continues to impact the New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut region, with more schools and universities closing or announcing modifications to lessen the risk of community spread.

 

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ABC News featured Pace University in "Coronavirus NY Update: CUNY, SUNY to cancel in-person classes as cases top 200 in New York"

03/11/2020

ABC News featured Pace University in "Coronavirus NY Update: CUNY, SUNY to cancel in-person classes as cases top 200 in New York"

Pace University suspends in-person classes

Starting March 11, Pace University is suspending in-person classes on all three campuses and moving all classes to remote learning through March 29.

Spring break for New York City and Pleasantville will continue as scheduled next week, with remote learning resuming after break.

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"ABC News" featured Lubin School of Business Marketing Professor Larry Chiagouris in "Eco Search Engine Sees Surge in Downloads as Amazon Burns"

08/29/2019

"ABC News" featured Lubin School of Business Marketing Professor Larry Chiagouris in "Eco Search Engine Sees Surge in Downloads as Amazon Burns"

Can you save the rainforest from your desk? A spike in downloads for a search engine that's contributing profits to planting trees shows people are looking for ways to help as fires rage across the Brazilian Amazon.

But experts say that while such efforts won't hurt, there are better ways to contribute.

Ecosia, a search engine founded in 2009, works with about 20 tree-planting organizations around the world in hopes of planting a billion trees by 2020. The Berlin-based company has pledged to plant an additional 2 million trees in Brazil in response to the fires.

Ecosia uses Microsoft Bing's search engine technology and sells ads just like many other tech companies. But instead of rewarding mostly shareholders, the company said it is contributing 80% of its profits to tree-planting efforts and keeping just a small amount for itself. The company estimates it can plant one tree for every 45 searches that people do.

Other companies and even celebrities are also taking action in response to the fires. Apple, for example, has pledged aid, though it has not given many details. Leonardo DiCaprio's foundation has pledged $5 million.

Can a typical person help the rainforest by simply changing search engines or supporting certain companies?

While switching to Ecosia requires little effort and "might make a difference," the best way to respond is to give directly to a charity that specializes in a cause and spends donations wisely, said Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University.

Art Markman, professor of psychology and marketing at the University of Texas, said disaster relief tends to be reactive and driven by the news cycle. He said charitable organizations can capitalize on that by making it easy to give money.

"Generally speaking, doing something is better than doing nothing," said Art Markman, professor of psychology and marketing at the University of Texas. "We tend to do things that are easy."

A nonprofit called B Lab has certified Ecosia as a for-profit company with a social mission. Ecosia's bigger goal is to combat climate change. It works with such nonprofit groups as The Nature Conservancy and the Eden Reforestation Projects.

Although it's possible to use Ecosia from a standard web browser, people can download an "extension" tool to make it the default search engine on traditional personal computers. Ecosia also has an app for iPhones, iPads and Android devices.

Since the fires began, Ecosia has seen downloads of the apps and extensions spike 10-fold, to about 250,000 a day, much for it from the U.S., Brazil, Latin America, Canada and Europe. Ecosia has also gotten 100 million searches a week, which the company says is a "huge increase," though it isn't saying by how much. The company said the spike has come through word of mouth via social media and media reports.

"We're very sad about what's happening, but at the same time we're really overwhelmed by all of the positive energy from people coming our way who want to do something," Ecosia founder Christian Kroll said.

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"ABC News" featured Dyson adjunct Professor Jennifer Powell-Lunder in "What parents and teachers can do to not make the 7th grade the worst ever"

05/11/2018

"ABC News" featured Dyson adjunct Professor Jennifer Powell-Lunder in "What parents and teachers can do to not make the 7th grade the worst ever"

..."In sixth grade, they coddle them. In eighth grade, they are getting ready to go to high school so they are really elevated," said Jennifer Powell-Lunder, a clinical psychologist and adjunct professor at Pace University in New York. "In seventh grade, no one really cares. You're thrown to the wolves. They really are in such an in-between age."

Parents of seventh-graders likely expect their kids to step up, too, and they are usually surprised when they don't -- or don't even seem to care.

"It's the age of snarky," Powell-Lunder said. "They tend to be more irritable, kind of touchy. They don’t believe they are a reflection of their parents, but that their parents are a reflection of them."

That means the potential for their parents to embarrass them in front of their almighty peers is at an all-time high. It's because kids at this developmental stage put more weight into what their peers think and where they fit in.

Give them autonomy, not independence

At the same time, teens and tweens still crave structure and boundaries, Powell-Lunder said.

They may be looking for more autonomy from their parents, but they are not yet ready to be fully independent. Setting limits, especially when it comes to technology, is important, she said.

"A lot of time parents want to be the 'nice' parent, but kids need rules," Powell-Lunder said.

Boundary-setting starts with knowing your child and what their individual needs are, as well as acknowledging that those needs change as they get older, Fox said.

"Mom and dad have to take a closer look at the children sitting in front of them," she said. "They are changing so rapidly. If you don’t keep up, you won’t know how to communicate or listen to them."

Don't try to fix everything

With rules, come consequences. Both Fox and Powell-Lunder said parents have to let their middle-schoolers fail sometimes.

"Let them take responsibility for being a full-time student," Fox said. "That’s a contract between student and teacher -- unless you’re planning to go to college with them."

"Be supportive but don't try to fix everything," Powell-Lunder said.

"Over-functioning parents will raise under-functioning kids," Fox added.

Practice what you preach

Kids at this age are also learning a lot by observing the adults around them.

Be careful what you're modeling to your kids, whether it's screaming and yelling or being tethered to your smartphone.

"Show you have more self-control than your son or daughter," Fox said.

Powell-Lunder tells teachers: "Teach by example."

Organization helps

At a time when kids seem the most disorganized, being organized seems to count the most.

Powell-Lunder, who is a big believer in the "K-8" model because it "smooths out the rough edges," said educators in middle schools need to be more understanding of seventh-graders and teach them the organizational skills they lack. Posting homework in one place certainly helps, she said.

Fox frowns on too much homework because she said it turns some middle school students off from education. This age group still needs time to pursue passions, she said, be with family and just daydream.

Talk less, listen more

Both Powell-Lunder and Fox encourage parents to show more empathy for what their children are going through.

"Ultimately, you want less stress and tension between parent and child, and more compassion and conversation and understanding," Fox said. "They are not getting it from their peers or their own internal monologues where they are putting themselves down. We are just adding to the chorus if all we’re doing is finding fault."

Read the full article.

 

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"ABC Eyewitness News" featured Pace University’s documentary "Puerto Rico: Hope in the Dark"

05/09/2018

"ABC Eyewitness News" featured Pace University’s documentary "Puerto Rico: Hope in the Dark"

“The students of Pace University captured the devastation in a unique way. They premiered the documentary Puerto Rico: Hope in the Dark at the Michael Schimmel Center of the Arts. The Student film makers gathered over 50 interviews in both Puerto Rico and Miami to develop a powerful story of the resilience and strength found in the people of Puerto Rico.”

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"ABC News" featured Haub Law School Professor Mimi Rocah in "Trump lawyer Michael Cohen is facing 'epic battle' by prosecutors for his cooperation: Alan Dershowitz"

04/23/2018

"ABC News" featured Haub Law School Professor Mimi Rocah in "Trump lawyer Michael Cohen is facing 'epic battle' by prosecutors for his cooperation: Alan Dershowitz"

... Another panelist, former federal prosecutor Mimi Rocah, disagreed with Dershowitz. Rocah, now a criminal justice fellow at Pace University Law School, said she believes Cohen will cooperate with prosecutors because he's vulnerable.

“I think he flips because I think he committed a lot of crimes, and he has got a lot of jail time that he's facing for that reason,” Rocah said

Dershowitz said Trump has "a unique weapon" on his side in any investigation -- the presidential pardon. However, he said in regard to Cohen, "I don't think he's going to be pardoned."

But ABC News chief legal analyst Dan Abrams, who was also part of the panel, had a different take.

“I think he's going to be pardoned," Abrams said. "I think he feels confident about that.” 

Read the full article.