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Above the Law featured alumn Kerriann Stout in "In Search Of A Silver Lining: How The Legal Community Is Serving During COVID-19'

05/19/2020

Above the Law featured alumn Kerriann Stout in "In Search Of A Silver Lining: How The Legal Community Is Serving During COVID-19'

Finally, I checked out what was going on at my own alma mater, The Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University (which used to just be Pace Law School back in my day), and I discovered two stories. The first was about two students who were called up to serve with their National Guard units. The second was about a rising 2L spending her free time sewing masks and organizing local food organizations to provide meals.

 I never thought I’d be one of those people who had to “look on the bright side,” but I guess this pandemic is changing us all in different ways. While it might be hard to see a lot of good in the world, or legal community, right now, it is there if you look for it.

Read the full Above the Law article.

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"Above the Law" featured the Elisabeth Haub School of Law in " Law School Eliminates Plastic from Campus to Promote Sustainability"

08/23/2018

"Above the Law" featured the Elisabeth Haub School of Law in " Law School Eliminates Plastic from Campus to Promote Sustainability"

What is Your Law School Doing to Save the Planet?

Each and every day, we all play a small role in destroying our one planet. Believe it or not, our actions are plotting the Earth’s demise. Luckily, efforts to promote sustainability have caught on across the country and around the globe, and some American law schools have moved forward with their own measures to make their campuses greener and reduce waste.

For example, the Pace University Elisabeth Haub School of Law recently announced that the administration has decided to eliminate plastic waste from its campus. Pace Law will no longer supply non-reusable plastic water bottles, plastic straws, disposable plates, or plastic cutlery to its students. Here’s some additional information from the school’s press release:

Beginning this week, the Law School will use paper straws instead of plastic and students will use china and metal flatware in the cafeteria. In addition, at all of its programs, the school will not use paper or plastic products and will provide water-filled bubblers rather than individual plastic water bottles.

“For decades, the Elisabeth Haub School of Law has been a pioneer in the field of environmental law and home to a nationally recognized environmental law program,” said Dean Horace Anderson. “I am so pleased that today, we are ensuring that we continue to lead the way by taking important measures to ensure that our campus is more sustainable than ever.”

“Plastic pollution is one of the most urgent environmental issues facing our planet. It is estimated that by 2050, there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish by weight,” said Gilbert and Sarah Kerlin Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law Jason Czarnezki. “The Law School is taking a first and necessary step to help confront this crisis and enact more sustainable practices.”

Not only is Pace going to try to help the environment by reducing its campus plastic use, but the law school is going to use energy efficient dishwashers in its cafeteria, install new recycling bins, and convert all campus water fountains to water filling stations by 2019. Everyone on campus is encouraged to use re-usable water bottles.

Congratulations to Pace Law on its efforts to increase campus sustainability! What is your law school doing to become more sustainable?

Read the article.

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Pace University Elisabeth Haub School of Law applicants can now use the GRE exam for admission featured in "Above the Law" by Kathryn Rubino

02/26/2018

Pace University Elisabeth Haub School of Law applicants can now use the GRE exam for admission featured in "Above the Law" by Kathryn Rubino

Above the Law: "New York Is Officially GRE Country"

By Kathryn Rubino

From "Above the Law:"

A fifth New York law school will now accept the GRE for admission.

Five New York law schools now accept the GRE in lieu of the LSAT for admission. Pace University Elisabeth Haub School of Law applicants can now use the alternative exam.

The GRE is rapidly gaining acceptance at law schools around the country. The full list of law schools currently accepting the GRE are: HarvardColumbiaSt. John’sBrooklyn Law SchoolNorthwesternArizonaGeorgetownHawaiiWashington University in St. LouisWake ForestCardozo School of LawTexas A&M, BYUJohn Marshall Law SchoolGeorge Washington, and Florida State. (Plus UCLA Law and the University of Chicago allow some students to take the GRE. Such as if they’re applying to a joint degree program or if already enrolled in another graduate program at the school.)

And we can expect even more law schools to join in on the GRE party. Seventeen law schools now accept the GRE for admissions, but according to a survey by Kaplan Test Prep, a full 25 percent of law schools have plans in the works to accept the GRE.

The powers-that-be at Pace have made what are now the expected comments about the GRE expanding the potential pool of law school applicants:

“Since our founding, Pace Law has welcomed a strong, diverse group of applicants and students to the law school,” said Dean David Yassky. “I am proud that the faculty’s decision to allow GRE scores in addition to the LSAT continues our long-standing tradition of removing barriers to students pursuing juris doctor degrees.”

“While we expect that most applicants will still submit LSAT scores, there are some who have already taken the GRE or for whom the GRE is more accessible. We look forward to reviewing their applications,” added associate dean of faculty development and strategic planning Emily Gold Waldman.

While the move to take the GRE is gaining steam in the legal education community there may be some reason for concern. The ABA — the law school accreditation body — still hasn’t weighed in on the validity of the GRE as an alternative to the LSAT. ABA Standard 503 requires admissions tests be “valid and reliable,” and whether or not the GRE meets that requirement is an open question. However, several law schools as well as the Educational Testing Service — the makers of the GRE — have done their own studies, which, unsurprisingly, affirm the validity of the exam.

Read the article.