main navigation
my pace

adjunct professor | PACE UNIVERSITY

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Coindesk.com featured Adjunct Professor Michael Kaplikov's piece "Previously Unpublished Emails of Satoshi Nakamoto Present a New Puzzle"

11/30/2020

Coindesk.com featured Adjunct Professor Michael Kaplikov's piece "Previously Unpublished Emails of Satoshi Nakamoto Present a New Puzzle"

Michael Kapilkov is an adjunct professor at Pace University in New York; since discovering Bitcoin, he has been interested in its origin story.  

Newly discovered emails between Satoshi Nakamoto, Bitcoin’s pseudonymous creator, and the late Hal Finney deepen the mystery around the cryptocurrency’s origins. 

The three emails come from Bitcoin’s earliest days, when its future was uncertain. They show how closely Satoshi collaborated with early supporters at the time of Bitcoin’s launch. 

While anything written or coded by Satoshi is intrinsically valuable to the community, perhaps the most intriguing parts of these messages are neither words nor code, but something seemingly prosaic: the timestamps, which present a new riddle.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"The Journal News / Lohud.com featured Pace adjunct professor and alumnus Judge Adrian Armstrong in "Mount Vernon city judge confirmed to spot on state Court of Claims"

07/27/2020

"The Journal News / Lohud.com featured Pace adjunct professor and alumnus Judge Adrian Armstrong in "Mount Vernon city judge confirmed to spot on state Court of Claims"

Armstrong got his law degree from Pace University School of Law and is an adjunct professor at Pace University and Monroe College.

Read the full The Journal News article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Broadway World featured Adjunct Professors Will Reynolds and Eric Price in "This MT Space Launches Online Musical Theater Classes"

06/04/2020

Broadway World featured Adjunct Professors Will Reynolds and Eric Price in "This MT Space Launches Online Musical Theater Classes"

Composer and lyricist team Will Reynolds and Eric Price (winners of the 2018 Fred Ebb Award) have launched This MT Space, a new online education platform.

Reynolds and Price, who are Adjunct Professors at Pace University School for Performing Arts and Molloy College/CAP21, will teach "Filling the Page," a musical theatre songwriting course, and "Filling the Gaps," a career-building class.

"Filling the Page" will emphasize storytelling through song and is designed for all levels of writers. Not only will the class focus on the creation of music and lyrics, but also on how that material can become digital content and reach audiences in our socially distanced communities. The class will also allow for an ongoing discussion about how the state of the world today informs the stories we tell.

"Filling the Gaps" will be a series of conversations with some of the most successful and impactful artists working on Broadway. Students will have the opportunity to interact with special guests, including Tony-nominees Jeremy Jordan (Newsies, The Last Five Years film) and Laura Osnes (Rodgers & Hammerstein's Cinderella, Bonnie & Clyde) along with Patti Murin (Frozen),Marc Bruni (director of Beautiful: The Carole King Musical), Jennifer Ashley Tepper (Creative and Programming Director of Feinstein's/54 Below, producer Be More Chill), Justin Guarini (American Idol, In Transit) and more to be announced.

Read the full Broadway World article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

I Love the Upper west side featured Adjunct Professor Daryl Corcoran in "“Books Are Like Cocktails”, Says Upper West Sider Making the Most of it"

03/27/2020

I Love the Upper West Side featured Adjunct Professor Daryl Corcoran in "“Books Are Like Cocktails”, Says Upper West Sider Making the Most of it"

Daryl Corcoran is a person who enjoys sharing opinions, urban exploration and travel-for-sports adventures with family and friends. “I’m also OK in my own head,” she says. For example, it’s sufficient for her to just note her own observations of the environment as she takes solo 2-mile walks for exercise in Riverside Park near her UWS apartment.

Having an abundance of inner resources, and the discipline to stick with a routine, is very helpful in managing the upheavals of daily life that arise in the midst of the COVID -19 crisis.

Corcoran’s can do/enjoy what’s possible in the moment approach to life is an inspiring model; it provides a solid foundation when you’re not free to go on a skiing weekend, play tennis, or even meet in person with your students, when that’s your job.

Routine is part of it. Getting up in the morning, making her bed, getting dressed and even putting on lipstick is a non-negotiable approach to starting each day for Corcoran. When the crisis required a mid-semester switch to online teaching, she admits to being a bit anxious. But, she mastered the technology and was then very pleased to find that all students in her English writing and ESL courses appeared online for the classes she teaches as an Adjunct at Pace University.

Read the full I Love the Upper West Side article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"The Daily Princetonian" featured adjunct instructor Jeremy Levine in "Q&A with adjunct professor Jeremy Levine on impeachment and Mueller '66"

11/13/2019

"The Daily Princetonian" featured adjunct instructor Jeremy Levine in "Q&A with adjunct professor Jeremy Levine on impeachment and Mueller '66"

Jeremy Levine is an adjunct instructor at New York University (NYU), The College of New Jersey (TCNJ), and Pace University. At NYU, Levine teaches a class titled “From Russia with Love? The Mueller Investigation and the Transformation of American Politics.” Invited to campus by the American Whig-Cliosophic Society, Levine gave a lecture entitled “Contextualizing the Hearings,” where he discussed Robert Mueller ’66’s independent investigation into President Donald Trump and the impeachment process more generally. Following the event on Nov. 5, The Daily Princetonian had the opportunity to sit down with Levine to discuss all things impeachment.

The Daily Princetonian: Just to start, could you give readers some background into who you are and how you came to teach a class on Robert Mueller’s report?

Jeremy Levine: I started, I became an adjunct professor … it'll be three years ago in January. I teach a variety of different classes: political science, economics, sociology, business — you name it, I've taught it. From there, I've always been politically active, I’ve always been very interested. I was a registered Republican when I turned 18. No more.

And I was very early on when [Trump] was running for President, especially when it came to Russia and foreign policy. I'm like, something's off. Something's not right. Something's off. This isn't like McCarthy or Eisenhower-Goldwater-Reagan Republicans. This isn't even like George Bush and Dick Cheney, like there's something fundamentally different. And I understand political parties change. You can go from, like, the Southern Dixiecrats of George Wallace and Strom Thurmond to Barack Obama. The Republican Party 100 years ago under Teddy Roosevelt was considered progressive. I get things change, and I get people change parties over time. The Roosevelts were different parties, Winston Churchill changed a time or two, so I get that. But the reasons I'm seeing are not good, and there was nothing to me that, like, wasn't corrupt and wasn't off, so that's where I tried to sound the alarm, like, “There’s something not right.”

I was offered a job to work for the campaign at Trump Tower in the summer of 2016, on [sic] Manafort right before he resigned. I said no, because I'm not — even from, like, aside from the racism, sexism, anti-immigrant, all the other stuff that I don't want to get associated with — one of the other reasons I said was, “There’s something not right with your foreign policy.” So that's kind of how I fell into it. Then, this year was the year I finally, ever since I was following, I put it together as a lecture. And even I didn't realize, and I've been following it, how much there actually is — how much corruption there really is. It blows my mind, so I understand why people are overwhelmed and have questions because I didn't [get] it: “What do you mean you don't get it?” But then I understood, as I put it together, why people are confused.

DP: Okay, so then, I guess, in terms of that confusion, what common misconceptions about both the report itself and the impeachment discussion exist?

JL: The idea that he investigated conspiracy and not collusion. Collusion is not a crime. It is in antitrust with companies. Other than that, individual acts like obstruction of justice, witness tampering, money laundering, that could be types of collusion, but those are the crimes. Nobody's going to get indicted for collusion, so when they say no collusion or collusion is not a crime. Yeah, okay, technically, there was no collusion because that's not a legal term in this case, and collusion isn't a crime, but X, Y, and Z sure as hell counts as types of collusion, and whether or not there was a grand conspiracy behind those acts [was] what Mueller was investigating.

That's one really big misconception people miss, but it works … again with the investigation. Mueller had to stay silent, given how many people are involved, and you don't want to tip anybody off, but when you stay silent, you lose control [of] the narrative, and for a long time, Trump had control of the narrative with that. And I would also say when it comes to whether or not a sitting president can be indicted, the answer is we don't know. That stems from what I talked about with Watergate, and how that was meant to keep Spiro Agnew out of the presidency. Should Nixon resign, which he ended up having to do, it was not meant to be the be-all end-all discussion on it. It's never been legally tested. It's never been tried in the courts. There's nothing that says that guideline or that memo is constitutional one way or another. So that's another big misconception, this idea that Trump can't be indicted. We don't know that. We have no idea.

Read the full Daily Princetonian article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed