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adjunct professor | PACE UNIVERSITY

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"The Journal News / Lohud.com featured Pace adjunct professor and alumnus Judge Adrian Armstrong in "Mount Vernon city judge confirmed to spot on state Court of Claims"

07/27/2020

"The Journal News / Lohud.com featured Pace adjunct professor and alumnus Judge Adrian Armstrong in "Mount Vernon city judge confirmed to spot on state Court of Claims"

Armstrong got his law degree from Pace University School of Law and is an adjunct professor at Pace University and Monroe College.

Read the full The Journal News article.

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Broadway World featured Adjunct Professors Will Reynolds and Eric Price in "This MT Space Launches Online Musical Theater Classes"

06/04/2020

Broadway World featured Adjunct Professors Will Reynolds and Eric Price in "This MT Space Launches Online Musical Theater Classes"

Composer and lyricist team Will Reynolds and Eric Price (winners of the 2018 Fred Ebb Award) have launched This MT Space, a new online education platform.

Reynolds and Price, who are Adjunct Professors at Pace University School for Performing Arts and Molloy College/CAP21, will teach "Filling the Page," a musical theatre songwriting course, and "Filling the Gaps," a career-building class.

"Filling the Page" will emphasize storytelling through song and is designed for all levels of writers. Not only will the class focus on the creation of music and lyrics, but also on how that material can become digital content and reach audiences in our socially distanced communities. The class will also allow for an ongoing discussion about how the state of the world today informs the stories we tell.

"Filling the Gaps" will be a series of conversations with some of the most successful and impactful artists working on Broadway. Students will have the opportunity to interact with special guests, including Tony-nominees Jeremy Jordan (Newsies, The Last Five Years film) and Laura Osnes (Rodgers & Hammerstein's Cinderella, Bonnie & Clyde) along with Patti Murin (Frozen),Marc Bruni (director of Beautiful: The Carole King Musical), Jennifer Ashley Tepper (Creative and Programming Director of Feinstein's/54 Below, producer Be More Chill), Justin Guarini (American Idol, In Transit) and more to be announced.

Read the full Broadway World article.

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I Love the Upper west side featured Adjunct Professor Daryl Corcoran in "“Books Are Like Cocktails”, Says Upper West Sider Making the Most of it"

03/27/2020

I Love the Upper West Side featured Adjunct Professor Daryl Corcoran in "“Books Are Like Cocktails”, Says Upper West Sider Making the Most of it"

Daryl Corcoran is a person who enjoys sharing opinions, urban exploration and travel-for-sports adventures with family and friends. “I’m also OK in my own head,” she says. For example, it’s sufficient for her to just note her own observations of the environment as she takes solo 2-mile walks for exercise in Riverside Park near her UWS apartment.

Having an abundance of inner resources, and the discipline to stick with a routine, is very helpful in managing the upheavals of daily life that arise in the midst of the COVID -19 crisis.

Corcoran’s can do/enjoy what’s possible in the moment approach to life is an inspiring model; it provides a solid foundation when you’re not free to go on a skiing weekend, play tennis, or even meet in person with your students, when that’s your job.

Routine is part of it. Getting up in the morning, making her bed, getting dressed and even putting on lipstick is a non-negotiable approach to starting each day for Corcoran. When the crisis required a mid-semester switch to online teaching, she admits to being a bit anxious. But, she mastered the technology and was then very pleased to find that all students in her English writing and ESL courses appeared online for the classes she teaches as an Adjunct at Pace University.

Read the full I Love the Upper West Side article.

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"The Daily Princetonian" featured adjunct instructor Jeremy Levine in "Q&A with adjunct professor Jeremy Levine on impeachment and Mueller '66"

11/13/2019

"The Daily Princetonian" featured adjunct instructor Jeremy Levine in "Q&A with adjunct professor Jeremy Levine on impeachment and Mueller '66"

Jeremy Levine is an adjunct instructor at New York University (NYU), The College of New Jersey (TCNJ), and Pace University. At NYU, Levine teaches a class titled “From Russia with Love? The Mueller Investigation and the Transformation of American Politics.” Invited to campus by the American Whig-Cliosophic Society, Levine gave a lecture entitled “Contextualizing the Hearings,” where he discussed Robert Mueller ’66’s independent investigation into President Donald Trump and the impeachment process more generally. Following the event on Nov. 5, The Daily Princetonian had the opportunity to sit down with Levine to discuss all things impeachment.

The Daily Princetonian: Just to start, could you give readers some background into who you are and how you came to teach a class on Robert Mueller’s report?

Jeremy Levine: I started, I became an adjunct professor … it'll be three years ago in January. I teach a variety of different classes: political science, economics, sociology, business — you name it, I've taught it. From there, I've always been politically active, I’ve always been very interested. I was a registered Republican when I turned 18. No more.

And I was very early on when [Trump] was running for President, especially when it came to Russia and foreign policy. I'm like, something's off. Something's not right. Something's off. This isn't like McCarthy or Eisenhower-Goldwater-Reagan Republicans. This isn't even like George Bush and Dick Cheney, like there's something fundamentally different. And I understand political parties change. You can go from, like, the Southern Dixiecrats of George Wallace and Strom Thurmond to Barack Obama. The Republican Party 100 years ago under Teddy Roosevelt was considered progressive. I get things change, and I get people change parties over time. The Roosevelts were different parties, Winston Churchill changed a time or two, so I get that. But the reasons I'm seeing are not good, and there was nothing to me that, like, wasn't corrupt and wasn't off, so that's where I tried to sound the alarm, like, “There’s something not right.”

I was offered a job to work for the campaign at Trump Tower in the summer of 2016, on [sic] Manafort right before he resigned. I said no, because I'm not — even from, like, aside from the racism, sexism, anti-immigrant, all the other stuff that I don't want to get associated with — one of the other reasons I said was, “There’s something not right with your foreign policy.” So that's kind of how I fell into it. Then, this year was the year I finally, ever since I was following, I put it together as a lecture. And even I didn't realize, and I've been following it, how much there actually is — how much corruption there really is. It blows my mind, so I understand why people are overwhelmed and have questions because I didn't [get] it: “What do you mean you don't get it?” But then I understood, as I put it together, why people are confused.

DP: Okay, so then, I guess, in terms of that confusion, what common misconceptions about both the report itself and the impeachment discussion exist?

JL: The idea that he investigated conspiracy and not collusion. Collusion is not a crime. It is in antitrust with companies. Other than that, individual acts like obstruction of justice, witness tampering, money laundering, that could be types of collusion, but those are the crimes. Nobody's going to get indicted for collusion, so when they say no collusion or collusion is not a crime. Yeah, okay, technically, there was no collusion because that's not a legal term in this case, and collusion isn't a crime, but X, Y, and Z sure as hell counts as types of collusion, and whether or not there was a grand conspiracy behind those acts [was] what Mueller was investigating.

That's one really big misconception people miss, but it works … again with the investigation. Mueller had to stay silent, given how many people are involved, and you don't want to tip anybody off, but when you stay silent, you lose control [of] the narrative, and for a long time, Trump had control of the narrative with that. And I would also say when it comes to whether or not a sitting president can be indicted, the answer is we don't know. That stems from what I talked about with Watergate, and how that was meant to keep Spiro Agnew out of the presidency. Should Nixon resign, which he ended up having to do, it was not meant to be the be-all end-all discussion on it. It's never been legally tested. It's never been tried in the courts. There's nothing that says that guideline or that memo is constitutional one way or another. So that's another big misconception, this idea that Trump can't be indicted. We don't know that. We have no idea.

Read the full Daily Princetonian article.

 

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"ABC News" featured Dyson adjunct Professor Jennifer Powell-Lunder in "What parents and teachers can do to not make the 7th grade the worst ever"

05/11/2018

"ABC News" featured Dyson adjunct Professor Jennifer Powell-Lunder in "What parents and teachers can do to not make the 7th grade the worst ever"

..."In sixth grade, they coddle them. In eighth grade, they are getting ready to go to high school so they are really elevated," said Jennifer Powell-Lunder, a clinical psychologist and adjunct professor at Pace University in New York. "In seventh grade, no one really cares. You're thrown to the wolves. They really are in such an in-between age."

Parents of seventh-graders likely expect their kids to step up, too, and they are usually surprised when they don't -- or don't even seem to care.

"It's the age of snarky," Powell-Lunder said. "They tend to be more irritable, kind of touchy. They don’t believe they are a reflection of their parents, but that their parents are a reflection of them."

That means the potential for their parents to embarrass them in front of their almighty peers is at an all-time high. It's because kids at this developmental stage put more weight into what their peers think and where they fit in.

Give them autonomy, not independence

At the same time, teens and tweens still crave structure and boundaries, Powell-Lunder said.

They may be looking for more autonomy from their parents, but they are not yet ready to be fully independent. Setting limits, especially when it comes to technology, is important, she said.

"A lot of time parents want to be the 'nice' parent, but kids need rules," Powell-Lunder said.

Boundary-setting starts with knowing your child and what their individual needs are, as well as acknowledging that those needs change as they get older, Fox said.

"Mom and dad have to take a closer look at the children sitting in front of them," she said. "They are changing so rapidly. If you don’t keep up, you won’t know how to communicate or listen to them."

Don't try to fix everything

With rules, come consequences. Both Fox and Powell-Lunder said parents have to let their middle-schoolers fail sometimes.

"Let them take responsibility for being a full-time student," Fox said. "That’s a contract between student and teacher -- unless you’re planning to go to college with them."

"Be supportive but don't try to fix everything," Powell-Lunder said.

"Over-functioning parents will raise under-functioning kids," Fox added.

Practice what you preach

Kids at this age are also learning a lot by observing the adults around them.

Be careful what you're modeling to your kids, whether it's screaming and yelling or being tethered to your smartphone.

"Show you have more self-control than your son or daughter," Fox said.

Powell-Lunder tells teachers: "Teach by example."

Organization helps

At a time when kids seem the most disorganized, being organized seems to count the most.

Powell-Lunder, who is a big believer in the "K-8" model because it "smooths out the rough edges," said educators in middle schools need to be more understanding of seventh-graders and teach them the organizational skills they lack. Posting homework in one place certainly helps, she said.

Fox frowns on too much homework because she said it turns some middle school students off from education. This age group still needs time to pursue passions, she said, be with family and just daydream.

Talk less, listen more

Both Powell-Lunder and Fox encourage parents to show more empathy for what their children are going through.

"Ultimately, you want less stress and tension between parent and child, and more compassion and conversation and understanding," Fox said. "They are not getting it from their peers or their own internal monologues where they are putting themselves down. We are just adding to the chorus if all we’re doing is finding fault."

Read the full article.

 

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"MassLive News" featured adjunct Dyson Professor Kency Gilet in "Young, black and Republican: Why this NRA member thinks education is key in the conversation about guns in America"

05/11/2018

"MassLive News" featured adjunct Dyson Professor Kency Gilet in "Young, black and Republican: Why this NRA member thinks education is key in the conversation about guns in America"

MassLive teamed up with Cambridge-based nonprofit Essential Partners to host Guns: An American Conversation, bringing together 15 strangers to share differing viewpoints on gun-related issues as part of an effort to connect and learn.

Kency Gilet hasn't always voted Republican.

When Barack Obama ran for president in 2008, Gilet was still in college and cast his vote, excited to see the first African-American in office.

"I got really excited about the hope and change and the first black president," Gilet, 30, said. "It was after President Obama was elected I decided to actually start paying attention to politics, and started having my own opinions."

He began to notice that Obama's policies and stances didn't really align with the conservative, religious values he was raised on. He started to see that his views were different than many of his friends.

By Obama's re-election, Gilet said he had been "outed" as a Republican.

"I think the initial shock people get is the fact that I'm a Republican," said Gilet, of Springfield. "It's because I'm black and it's because I'm a mental health professional. I'm an adjunct professor, I was the PTO president for a couple years at my kids' school. In their minds, I'm in a very liberal field. In all these fields, I'm supposed to be nice and like people. How can I be nice and like people and also be a Republican? That's the mental block I think people have."

So as a young, black NRA member who works in the mental health field, Gilet brought a unique perspective to Guns: An American Conversation, an event hosted by MassLive and Cambridge-based Essential Partners that brought 15 strangers together to learn effective skills in communication and discuss guns over 24 hours on May 5.

While Gilet found the Guns: An American Conversation discussion to be productive, he said he didn't walk away feeling like he learned something new or had his eyes opened widely by the other side.  

The group got to know each other on Saturday morning before the real discussion began. A series of activities helped the 15 strangers connect and learn about each other. The group then participated in a two-hour dialogue session focused exclusively on the gun debate in America, with both pro and anti-gun viewpoints supported and expressed.

Last year, Gilet ran for Springfield City Council. It was also the year that he purchased a gun for the first time. 

"I often feel like I'm demonized, and gun owners are demonized, because even though they are among the most law-abiding citizens because of all the background checks and all the things that you have to go through to even get a firearm, I still feel demonized and hear a lot of anti-rhetoric," he said.

But that rhetoric did not rear its head during Guns: An American Conversation.

"I still half expected there to be more high emotions, animosity...It was actually really good. Everyone was respectful. Everyone appeared open to hearing people's viewpoints," said Gilet, a mental health clinician at the River Valley Counseling Center in Holyoke who assists students and staff at the Peck Middle School, as well as being an adjunct professor at Pace University.

But Gilet said he didn't feel like the arguments he heard from those who were more on the side of gun control opened his eyes to something new.

"I always want to learn more. I don't ever want to walk on this Earth ignorant. I want to hear different opinions but I haven't heard anything that I haven't already heard and a lot of the arguments that I heard this weekend were based out of ignorance," Gilet said, noting that he felt people came out of the discussion with the goal of researching more facts associated with the use of firearms.

One statistic he pointed to is the fact that nearly two-thirds of gun deaths in the country are suicides, a fact that is often overlooked in the discussion about guns in America.

Read the full article.