main navigation
my pace

Brenna Hassinger-Das | PACE UNIVERSITY

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Bored Panda featured Dyson Professor Brenna Hassinger-Das in "50 Stupid Things Kids Did That Adults Just Had To Share (New Pics)"

12/15/2020

Bored Panda featured Dyson Professor Brenna Hassinger-Das in "50 Stupid Things Kids Did That Adults Just Had To Share (New Pics)"

To find out how children think and come up with the most incredible things we as adults would never think of, one has to look into the world from a child’s point of view. And it turns out, this is very different from the ways adults view the world around them. One of the driving forces in a child’s development is curiosity, which helps them to discover and try out new things and learn something about them. This early knowledge is something kids carry well into their childhood and maturity. Bored Panda reached out to Brenna Hassinger-Das, an assistant professor in the psychology department at Pace University, New York. Brenna explained that the job of children is “to play and learn.” But making ourselves time to be curious in whatever forms we can is something that adults should also work on throughout their lives. “Research suggests that it relates to satisfaction, happiness, empathy, and problem-solving skills,” the professor said and added, “we are always in need of refining the ways in which we view the world.”

Read the full Bored Panda article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Conversation featured Professor Brenna Hassinger-Das' co-written article "3 Year Olds Find YouTube Better for Learning"

11/30/2020

The Conversation featured Professor Brenna Hassinger-Das' co-written article "3 Year Olds Find YouTube Better for Learning"

Young kids believe that YouTube videos are better for learning than TV shows or videos created on a researcher’s smartphone. They also view people in YouTube videos to be more real than those on TV but less real than those featured in a researcher-created smartphone video. These are the major findings from a pre-COVID-19 study conducted in U.S. children’s museums in 2019. Brenna Hassinger-Das is Assistant Professor of Psychology, Pace University.

Read the full Conversation article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Medium featured Dyson Professor Brenna Hassinger-Das piece: "Technological Tradeoffs During COVID-19"

10/15/2020

Medium featured Dyson Professor Brenna Hassinger-Das piece: "Technological Tradeoffs During COVID-19"

The educational landscape has shifted radically, and these changes may not go away anytime soon — if ever.

As a children and media researcher, I have spent a lot of time since the COVID-19 pandemic began thinking about screen time. By April 2020, school closures affected 1.2 billion children worldwide — and research suggests that half of all US children are continuing to learn online this fall. Online learning platforms — such as Zoom, YouTube, and a variety of educational apps — have become ubiquitous for children from preschool through high school age. The educational landscape has shifted radically, and these changes may not go away anytime soon — if ever.

However, pre-pandemic, children were already using screen devices on an increasingly regular basis — with mobile device use tripling from 2013–2017. There has also been a rise in the amount of child-directed content that is available across multiple devices and platforms. Yet, I am of the belief that current data doesn’t conclusively suggest that screen time causes significant, detrimental effects in children. Research does suggest that behavioral and health problems may relate to excessive screen time — but causal connections are not clear. Based on my understanding of the literature, in March 2020, I advised caregivers of one screen time rule that it is okay to break (previous daily screen time limits), one rule caregivers can bend (most restrictions on where/when to use devices), and one to keep (screen-free bedtime).

I have tried to take my own advice as the pandemic wears on. As a pre-tenure faculty member and the mother of a six-year-old, I am now teaching on Zoom while my child completes virtual first grade. I definitely started making trade-offs regarding technology use that I would not have previously considered so that I can write and teach — with my child consuming far more digital media than usual. We have found a routine that works for us, and I supplement the screen time with hands-on and outdoor activities. I often explain to my child that this is not forever — but how do we really know? The uncertainty is one the big factors that is causing a lot of stress for parents like myself, and I wish I had the answers.

Read the Medium article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Edwardsville Intelligencer featured Dyson Professor Brenna Hassinger-Das piece "Parents, cut yourself some slack on screen time limits while you're stuck at home"

03/20/2020

The Edwardsville Intelligencer featured Dyson Professor Brenna Hassinger-Das piece "Parents, cut yourself some slack on screen time limits while you're stuck at home"

(THE CONVERSATION) As families hunker down during the coronavirus pandemic, many parents may wonder how much screen time they should let their kids have. Brenna Hassinger-Das, a scholar of children and technology, shares one rule it’s OK to break, one rule parents can bend and a best practice worth upholding.

1. Break: Previous daily screen time limits

The American Academy of Pediatrics warns parents that letting children spend too much time watching TV shows or playing video games on any device can make them more anxious, reduce their ability to control impulses and disturb their sleep. How much screen time varies by age. The doctors’ group advises avoiding all screen time, aside from video chats, for babies and toddlers up to 18 months old, and sets gradually increasing limits after that.

Between the ages of 2 and 5, for instance, the academy estimates that kids can safely get up to an hour of daily screen time, as long as their parents or caregivers join in. It advises parents of kids 6 and up to consistently limit time spent using digital media and to make sure that screen time doesn’t displace sleep or physical activity.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Parentology" featured Pace University's Assistant Professor of Psychology Brenna Hassinger-Das in "The Smartest Way to Read E-Books to Your Kids"

05/15/2019

"Parentology" featured Pace University's Assistant Professor of Psychology Brenna Hassinger-Das in "The Smartest Way to Read E-Books to Your Kids"

Read That E-book with Your Kid

“We found that children understood the story best when their parent read to them – they were able to recall more details from the story and answer more questions about the plot,” Rebecca Dore, a Senior Research Associate at Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy at The Ohio State University, told Parentology. “This suggests that children are going to benefit the most from this type of technology when parents use it with them. However, we also found that children did seem to understand some of the story using the audio narration: children in that group recalled more details than children who just looked at the pictures.“

Other researchers agree. Brenna Hassinger-Das, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Pace University, stated that her findings were similar in trend.

“To some degree, parent speech was influenced by platform; although there was no clear pattern that emerged. Yet, the most interesting finding was that a critical element of book reading might be the type of parent speech used, regardless of platform,” Hassinger-Das wrote in an article for Bold. “There was a (thus far non-significant) trend for children whose parents used the most distancing talk to demonstrate the most story content knowledge, regardless of condition or age. Distancing talk—language that relates the story to children’s own lives—has been shown to help children connect with stories and make inferences.”

In other words, the parent is best equipped to connect the e-book’s words with the context of their child’s life.

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed