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Bridget J. Crawford | PACE UNIVERSITY

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ABA Journal featured Pace Law School professors Bridget J. Crawford and Emily Gold Waldman's piece "Do some states really prohibit bringing tampons and pads to the bar exam?"

07/24/2020

ABA Journal featured Pace Law School professors Bridget J. Crawford and Emily Gold Waldman's in "Do some states really prohibit bringing tampons and pads to the bar exam?"

Bridget J. Crawford and Emily Gold Waldman, Pace Law School professors, wrote a column on Law.com urging states to allow bar exam test-takers to bring their own menstrual products, rather than providing the items in public bathrooms.

Read the full ABA Journal article.

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New York Law Journal featured Haub Law Professors Bridget J. Crawford and Emily Gold Waldman's piece "Tampons and Pads Should Be Allowed at the Bar Exam"

07/23/2020

New York Law Journal featured Haub Law Professors Bridget J. Crawford and Emily Gold Waldman's piece "Tampons and Pads Should Be Allowed at the Bar Exam"

Bar exam takers around the country are facing unprecedented uncertainty. In less than two weeks, thousands of recent law graduates will sit down in hotel ballrooms, convention centers and large classrooms to take the test that they have been training for three (or more years) to take. With little notice, several states have cancelled the bar exam because of COVID-19 health concerns. Some states like New Jersey and Florida announced an online bar exam in lieu of traditional testing that otherwise would require hundreds or thousands of people to crowd into enclosed spaces for several hours a day over a two-day period. Oregon and Utah canceled their exams and granted a “diploma privilege” to allow law graduates to practice without taking the bar exam. New York axed its test just seven weeks before the big day, with no plans for an alternate test administration. Other states, including those where COVID-19 infection rates continue to rise, are going full-speed ahead with plans to administer in-person tests later this month.

Read the full New York Law Journal article.