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The Broadsheet featured Pace University in "A Flood of Ideas"

02/28/2020

The Broadsheet featured Pace University in "A Flood of Ideas"

On Monday, February 24, the City’s Economic Development Corporation and the Mayor’s Office of Resiliency hosted an interactive Community Open House at Pace University’s conference center to discuss the ongoing development of the Climate Resilience Master Plan for the Financial District and Seaport neighborhoods, as part of the broader Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency project.

The Open House was divided into different rooms, each one explaining separate aspects of future challenges to keep Lower Manhattan above water.

Participants learned about existing infrastructure, such as combined sewer pipes and outfalls, and how the City is understanding and coming up with solutions to deal with severe storms as well as sea level rise due to climate change.

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"The Broadsheet Daily" featured Pace University School for the Performing Arts in "The BroadsheetDAILY ~ News of Lower Manhattan"

10/02/2019

"The Broadsheet Daily" featured Pace University School for the Performing Arts in "The BroadsheetDAILY ~ News of Lower Manhattan"

The Pace University School for the Performing Arts will stage To Clothe the Naked, a rarely performed drama by Nobel Prize-winning playwright Luigi Pirandello, from October 1 to 6, at the 3-Legged Dogtheater (80 Greenwich Street, south of Rector Street).

The story, a blend of Pirandello’s trademark blend of heartbreak and unsentimentality, is the tale of a young girl-seduced, abused, and abandoned-who struggles to create an identity for herself.

Tickets for this Broadway-quality production are priced at less than a movie ($15 for adults; $5.00 for students).

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"The Broadsheet" featured Pace University in "News of Lower Manhattan September 10, 2019"

09/11/2019

"The Broadsheet" featured Pace University in "News of Lower Manhattan September 10, 2019"

On Wednesday, September 11, Pace University will host a 9/11 tribute and walk to commemorate lives lost on September 11, 2001.

The event will feature speakers who were part of the response efforts and staff members who were working at Pace on the day of the attacks. Speakers will include Marvin Krislov, President, Pace University; Marijo O’Grady, Associate Vice President, Dean for Students; Peter Riley, Director of Veteran Services, Pace University; and Pace University student veterans.

After the remarks, participants will walk to the 9/11 Memorial at Pace University that honors the members of the Pace community who lost their lives on that day.

The event will take place at Pace University Student Center located at One Pace Plaza (across from City Hall).

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"The Broadsheet" featured Pace University's associate vice president and Dean for Students Marijo Russell-O’Grady and her new book in "Meditations in an Emergency"

03/29/2019

"The Broadsheet" featured Pace University's associate vice president and Dean for Students Marijo Russell-O’Grady and her new book in "Meditations in an Emergency"

Battery Park City resident Marijo Russell-O’Grady has co-authored a new book that is timely and topical, albeit in a troubling way. With her colleague, Katie Treadwell, Dr. Russell-O’Grady (who holds a PhD in higher education administration) has written, “Crisis, Compassion, and Resiliency in Student Affairs: Using Triage Practices to Foster Well-Being,” a research-driven analysis of the experiences of professional educators who have lived through (and helped manage the response to) tragedies such as active shooters, major terrorist attacks, natural disasters, mass-casualty events, and student deaths.

Since 1998, Dr. Russell-O’Grady has served as an associate vice president and Dean for Students at Pace University’s campus in Lower Manhattan. So she was still relatively new to her job on a bright morning 18 years ago, when, as she recalled in a Pace oral history interview, “first I heard the noise, and I looked out and there’s a plane. I saw it pass Woolworth. I saw and felt the buildings shake upon impact. I see all these people running all over the streets. I remember going downstairs and seeing a former student, and he was crying. And he was kind of a tough guy.”

“And I looked, and the building’s on fire, and you’re seeing people out on the window ledges and you’re seeing people running for their lives,” she continued. “So I said to everyone in the front, get to the other building. Get back and go to the other building. And I said we should close this building. I said to everyone, get into cover, get out of here. I said get everybody on these floors out.”

“And so I went out and I went to the other building and told people to get inside, get inside, go into One Pace Plaza,” Dr. Russell-O’Grady recalled. “Don’t stay out here. Cause there’s just so many people running, chaos. And then I went to security, and the minute I got to security, people were in panic and were asking for masks, and people were calling, are we still having classes? And the phones were going off the hook, and people wanted masks and I’m like, listen. Buildings and grounds had already turned off the exhaust so we weren’t bringing in the bad stuff.”

“We were giving out water and masks,” she remembered. “Then we got people into the Schimmel auditorium, into the gym, into the cafeteria, and I remember large crowds, trying to get people into the lower floors. In the gym there was a rumor started that there was a gas leak in there, so people started to shove like the start of a panic, of a trample, and we said no. Get the air horns out. There is no gas here. We don’t have gas. We’re okay. And then staff started coming and they would give out free food. You know, counseling was dishing ice cream and food and just getting people food.”

Dr. Russell-O’Grady described the process she helped oversee at Pace that day, and in the weeks that followed, as “triage — doing what matters most in the moment during a crisis event.” This skill is sadly not specific to September 11, 2001. Ever since the 1999 school shooting massacre at Columbine High School in Colorado, violence at educational institutions has been a recurring theme in American life, with crises on campuses and at schools an increasingly common event. In such circumstances, educators and administrators  are called upon to serve as the ‘first’ first responders.

Dr. Russell-O’Grady says of her book, “there are many lessons that can be applied to other fields. It is about being able to see and manage the ‘forest and the trees’ in times of crisis. As Clark Kerr said ‘a university reveals its soul during a crisis,’ and I believe this to be true. The care of that soul, and those impacted by a crisis, need attention as we bring a campus or a business back in operation. We live in turbulent times, and higher education professionals are poised to confront and manage these situations. The book reinforces, through storytelling about campus incidents, the need for care, to work with others, and to bring the community affected back from the ashes.”

Dr. Russell-O’Grady moved to the Financial District in 1998, and then to Gateway Plaza in 2009, where she was able to observe the community’s response to Hurricane Sandy, three years later. In the two decades she has been at Pace, she notes that the job has evolved. “I have a lot more training in sort of emergency stuff, which I had before but now it’s more specific to these kinds of things. But I would say that my number one concern always is to care for the students — are they okay? And two, are we safe? So I think it has intensified.”

When not acting as an advocate for student at Pace, Dr. Russell-O’Grady has served on the Downtown Little League’s board of directors for ten years. After rotating through stints as secretary, Opening Day coordinator and safety officer, she currently helps out with the Challenger League, which offers baseball for individuals with disabilities.

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"The Broadsheet" featured The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University in "Legendary Actors Studio Offers Free Plays in FiDi Now Through May"

04/17/2018

"The Broadsheet" featured The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University in "Legendary Actors Studio Offers Free Plays in FiDi Now Through May"

The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University is currently exhibiting its annual repertory season of plays at the 3-Legged Dog (3LD) Art & Technology Center in Lower Manhattan. This weekend, and during the following four weeks, the two organizations are partnering to offer six shows staged by students graduating with MFA degrees in acting, directing, and playwriting. All of these performances are free to attend.

Tonight (Friday, April 13) and tomorrow (Saturday, April 14), the program will feature “Shoulda, Coulda, Woulda,”playwright Daniel Blanda’s look at the dynamics of friendship and regret, along with, “Does This Woman Have A Name?,” Theresa Rebeck’s hilarious satire of literary pretensions set against the backdrop of the phone sex business.

Next week (Wednesday, April 18 through Saturday, April 21), the headliners are, “The Book of Liz,” by David Sedaris & Amy Sedaris, which looks at a young lady with a chronic sweating problem, and her relationship to a religious sect called the Squeamish, which is sustained by her secret recipe for gourmet cheese balls.

The Actors Studio repertory season continues the following week (Wednesday, April 25 through Saturday, April 28) with a double bill of “The Mistress of Wholesome,” by Jacob Appel and “The Slave,” by LeRoi Jones. The former is a comedy about a cardiologist’s wife whose world is turned upside down when her husband’s mistress and the social worker vetting her for adopting a child show up on her doorstep on the same day. The latter is a harrowing, apocalyptic drama about race and class in America.

And the program concludes the first week in May (Wednesday, May 2 through Saturday, May 5) with “Boeing-Boeing,” a modern-classic farce written Marc Camoletti, about a Paris bachelor happily engaged to three stewardesses simultaneously, until the advent of faster trans-Atlantic flights upends his carefully choreographed routine.

All of these plays are being staged at 3LD (80 Greenwich Street, between Rector and Edgar Streets), and the four performances begin at 7:30 pm on the days indicated. There is also a Saturday matinee for each production, which starts at 3:00 pm.

All performances are free, but space is limited and anybody wishing to attend is urged to register in advance for complimentary tickets by browsing asdsrepseason.com, and clicking on “Make a Reservation.” (Tickets registered in advance will be held at 3LD’s Will Call window at no charge.) For additional information, please call 3LD at 212-645-0374.

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