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Business Insider featured Pace University cruise expert Andrew Coggins in "More than half of all coronavirus cases outside China are from the Diamond Princess, but the cruise ship is already planning to set sail again in April"

02/20/2020

Business Insider featured Pace University cruise expert Andrew Coggins in "More than half of all coronavirus cases outside China are from the Diamond Princess, but the cruise ship is already planning to set sail again in April"

"Normal practice in the case of norovirus or Legionnaires' disease is to pinpoint and isolate the source of the illness, then cancel or postpone the next cruise and thoroughly disinfect the ship from top to bottom once all the passengers are off," Andrew Coggins, a cruise expert at Pace University in New York, told the Journal.

 

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"Business Insider" featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow Mimi Rocah in "House Democrats just gave Republicans everything they wanted in the impeachment inquiry"

11/01/2019

"Business Insider" featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow Mimi Rocah in "House Democrats just gave Republicans everything they wanted in the impeachment inquiry"

“In a court of law, the trial wouldn’t even have started yet, so this is really dumb,” Mimi Rocah, a former federal prosecutor from the Southern District of New York, tweeted in reference to the GOP argument that Trump was being robbed of due process. “House is in the investigation/grand jury phase which always takes place behind closed doors. The open hearings & trial part” will take place in the Senate.

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"Business Insider" featured Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Professor Leora Trub in "Millennials and Gen Z love their technology — but American seniors are actually spending the most time on their screens"

08/16/2019

"Business Insider" featured Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Professor Leora Trub in "Millennials and Gen Z love their technology — but American seniors are actually spending the most time on their screens"

... In fact, the addiction criteria usually used for drugs and alcohol is now being used for technology, Leora Trub, Ph.D., who leads Pace University's Digital Media and Psychology Lab, previously told Business Insider.

She likens a technology addiction, specifically, to food addiction. Technology, she noted, is "... out there for everyone, everyone needs to use it to some extent for their daily lives. It's an alluring and compelling thing."

But when used with moderation and self-control, watching TV isn't a bad thing, as it can offer both distraction and entertainment as a coping mechanism for burnout or stress, Trub said: "Everyone should get to have their own vices and TV is a fine one." 

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"Business Insider" featured Dyson Professor Leora Trub, Ph.D. in "Millennials are turning to Netflix to cope with burnout, and it highlights the similarities between technology addiction and food cravings"

07/22/2019

"Business Insider" featured Dyson Professor Leora Trub, Ph.D. in "Millennials are turning to Netflix to cope with burnout, and it highlights the similarities between technology addiction and food cravings"

Millennials are the "burnout generation."

To cope, they're turning to Netflix and Hulu, according to a recent survey by YellowBrick, a psychiatric and trauma treatment center for young adults. The survey polled more than 2,000 American millennials between the ages of 23 and 38 about burnout.

When asked how they cope with burnout, 16% of respondents said they watch Netflix, Hulu, or TV. They also reported sleeping and exercise as a coping mechanism (10% each), followed by drinking alcohol (9%), taking drugs (8%), meditation (8%), surfing the Internet (7%), and talking to friends/family (5%).

Watching Netflix isn't the worst kind of coping strategy, psychologist Leora Trub, Ph.D., who leads Pace University's Digital Media and Psychology Lab, told Business Insider. It offers both distraction and entertainment as coping mechanisms, she said.

But whether this coping strategy is healthy or not depends on the person, Trub said. Ultimately, it's all about moderation.

Using technology to create distance from technology

The fact that millennials are turning to one type of technology to create distance from another type of technology is emblematic of an increasingly connected world. And it can become a problematic habit, Trub said. That's because watching one episode of Netflix can turn into binge-watching — watching episode after episode of a TV show.

"You have to find resources within yourself to take a step back and figure out your relationship with [watching Netflix or TV] and what you want it to be," Trub said, adding that we have to work hard to develop a healthy relationship with technology because it's so immersive.

She added: "Generally, the younger people are, the less good they are at anticipating their own responses to things. We're no longer giving people the opportunity to cultivate skills that have to do with keeping yourself nourished without technology."

The addiction criteria usually used for drugs and alcohol is now being used for technology, Trub said. But she likens a technology addiction more specifically to a food addiction. Technology, she noted, is "... out there for everyone, everyone needs to use it to some extent for their daily lives. It's an alluring and compelling thing."

The key is navigating your relationship with TV

Because Netflix and its peers are so accessible, regulating the use of it calls for an incredible amount of self-control, especially when you're stressed out, Trub said.

Trub noted that TV has gotten more stimulating over time: Shows in the 1980s didn't have the level of drama or stimulation that today's shows, like Game of Thrones and Handmaid's Tale, do. Now that entertainment has upped the ante, Trub said, moving on to the next episode could be problematic for sleep if you're not careful.

"It's hard to control or moderate Netflix use and navigate your relationship with it," Trub said. "Technology sets it up so that you can binge-watch — the battle to turn it off is up to you."

Binge-watching can damage your health, reported Lindsay Dodgson for Business Insider, citing a study published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. The study found that binge-watching can lower our quality of sleep and increase fatigue, leading to long-term effects such as changes in performance, cognitive thinking, and immune system, and an increased risk of heart disease and cancer.

The researchers who conducted the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine study said it's unrealistic to expect people to stop binge-watching altogether, but suggested drawing boundaries like stopping an hour before going to bed or doing it on the weekends only. However, when being used as a coping mechanism, it's likely that streaming services and TV are specifically being turned to after a long day at work, before bed — and that's where self-control comes in.

"For people who are able to behave in line with their intentions, it's not a bad thing," Trub said. "Everyone should get to have their own vices and TV is a fine one."

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"Business Insider" ranked Pace University #2 in "RANKED: The 50 most underrated colleges in America"

11/19/2018

"Business Insider" ranked Pace University #2 in "RANKED: The 50 most underrated colleges in America"

2. Pace University

Location: New York, New York

US News ranking: 177

Median mid-career salary: $60,300

Pace University is known for its liberal arts and business programs. Students told The Princeton Review that the student body is "as diverse as the city around us." 

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"Business Insider" featured Pace University's Dyson Professor Joseph Constantino Morreale in "Joseph Constantino Morreale is recognized by Continental Who's Who"

10/18/2018

"Business Insider" featured Pace University's Dyson Professor Joseph Constantino Morreale in "Joseph Constantino Morreale is recognized by Continental Who's Who"

Joseph Constantino Morreale is recognized by Continental Who's Who as a Pinnacle Professional in the field of Education at Pace University.  

With its inception in 1906, Pace University is a privately run university that has facilitated in the advancement of thousands of students throughout the years. Pace University offers its students the resources that they need in order to further their educational advancement.

Professor and Chair of the Economics Department at Pace University, Joseph Constantino Morreale has served in academia for over forty seven years.  Aside from offering his expertise in Economics, Morreale offers his knowledge in Health Economics, Environmental Economics, Public Finance, Public Policy, and Chinese Economic Studies.

A distinguished Author and co-author of several articles and books published within the educational industry, Morreale is a distinguished fellow of several prominent organizations including the American Economics Association and the International Atlantic Economics Society, where he was recently elected to the Executive Board, and is a member of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management. 

Early in his career, Morreale attained his Master of Arts and Ph.D. in Economics from the SUNY University of Buffalo.  Later, he earned his M.S.H. Ed. in Administration and Finance from the SUNY University of Albany.  An American Council on Education Fellow, Morreale spent one year as a Higher Education Administration Intern at UNC-Charlotte.

Established in May of 2009, Morreale is the Founder and active member of the Confucius Institute at Pace University. The institute is known for its collaboration between the East and West, especially China and Western Nations, and the union of both arts and sciences. It is well known for organizing programs in Chinese Culture, History, and Language.

A teacher, scholar and administrator at over seven top universities and colleges in the U.S and abroad, China and the U.K. included, Morreale has taught Public Finance and Public Economic Policy Analysis. In addition, Morreale has taught an exemplary Senior Economic Research Seminar, a China Travel Study Abroad course and informed many about the Political and Economic relations between the U.S. and China as well as on Public Economic Policy issues, including the environment and healthcare concerns. He has also been active in politics, being elected Town Councilman and serving on the Town's Planning Board for the Town of Mt. Kisco in Westchester, NY.

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