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Bustle featured Professor Christen Cupples Cooper of the College of Health Professions in "Why you feel hungover even if you didn't drink"

08/27/2020

Bustle featured Professor Christen Cupples Cooper of the College of Health Professions in "Why you feel hungover even if you didn't drink"

According to Christen Cupples Cooper, Ed.D., R.D., a professor at the College of Health Professions at Pace University, hot weather, sports, illnesses that cause diarrhea and vomiting, and simply not taking in enough liquids can lead to varying degrees of dehydration, which can make you feel hungover. "Mild dehydration can lead to brain confusion, fatigue, dizziness and irritability," Cooper tells Bustle, also likely describing many of your mornings.

Read the full Bustle article.

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"Bustle" featured Dr. Joanne Singleton, Professor at the College of Health Professions at Pace University, in "How To Deal With Anxiety About Getting The Flu"

10/08/2018

"Bustle" featured Dr. Joanne Singleton, Professor at the College of Health Professions at Pace University, in "How To Deal With Anxiety About Getting The Flu"

Flu season is looming. Unfortunately, while you attempt to avoid the flu, you might feel creeping anxiety from the sense of being so out of control. Anxiety about the flu is common. But with anxiety relief tactics and increased awareness about how you actually can catch the flu, you may be able to feel better than you expected.

First, it’s important to acknowledge that being worried about the flu is completely valid. There are three main reasons that these fear makes sense. “You can’t see it,” Dr. Joanne Singleton, Professor at the College of Health Professions at Pace University, tells Bustle. “[And] getting the flu vaccine doesn’t guarantee that one of the strains in the immunization will be the one that infects everyone. [Plus,] people, especially young, old and those with other health conditions die from the flu.” And while serious complications are rare (between 12,000 and 50,000 in 2011-2013, according to the Centers for Disease Control), and only five to 20 percent of the population will get the flu at all, it’s still completely reasonable to fear an illness that has so much media buzz and general panic surrounding it.

It’s important to remember that a lot of health-conscious people are going to have similar worries to you this flu season. “Know that you’re not alone,” therapist Elizabeth Cush, LCPC, tells Bustle. “A lot of people worry about getting the flu. It’s no fun to get! Try to keep focused on what’s actually happening in the moment instead of getting caught up in the ‘what-ifs’ and worst-case scenario thinking. If you do get sick with the flu take care of yourself!” It’s healthiest to try to minimize how much you worry in the meantime.

Here are eight ways to deal with health anxiety around the flu, according to experts.

You may have concerns about the effectiveness of the flu shot, but it’s super important to get vaccinated nonetheless. You may not realize just how helpful it is, even if it doesn’t protect against every strain of the flu.

“Hedge your bets, get the flu vaccine and go for the quadrivalent, which has four possible strains of the flu, versus the trivalent, which has only three,” Dr. Singleton says. “Even if the vaccine does not have the prevalent strain, if you get the flu you will most likely have a milder case.” If there’s an option to be less sick if possible, you should go for it. “Partial protection lessens the symptoms and severity of the virus greatly reducing your risk for the more serious complications like pneumonia,” health and safety investigator Caitlin Hoff, tells Bustle. Your future self will definitely thank you.

Breaking a sweat via exercise can help anxiety, yes, but sweating alone, regardless of how, actually helps your immune system, too. So however you choose to break a sweat, your chances of getting the flu, and your anxiety around it, might go down.

“Whether you sweat it out in a workout class, enjoy a good run or spend time in a infrared sauna, you (and your immune system) will feel the benefits,” Amanda Carney, the director of health coaching at wellness platform Be Well tells Bustle. So, as long as you aren’t already sick, head to the spa or the gym, and see your flu fears fly away.

You may already know that not getting enough sleep is bad for anxiety, but it’s bad for your immune system too. So if you’re looking to deal with flu stress and keep yourself as healthy as possible, you should be getting a good night’s sleep throughout flu season.

“Don’t burn the candle at both ends,” Dr. Singleton says. “Support your immune system with proper sleep.” The connection between sleep and immune health is not to be undersold. So practice some sleep hygiene, and have a cozy flu season.

During flu season, you can help mitigate some of your anxiety by practicing habits that are proven to help prevent the spread of the flu. That means that every day you do these little things, you can remind yourself that you’re actively making steps to stay healthy.

Read the full article.