main navigation
my pace

Christen Cupples Cooper | PACE UNIVERSITY

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

GQ featured says registered dietician and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program Christen Cooper in "How to Gain Weight the Right Way"

10/16/2020

GQ featured says registered dietician and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program Christen Cooper in "How to Gain Weight the Right Way"

Conversations about weight typically revolve around losing it. But is a real subset of people out there wondering how to gain weight. The guys who struggle to find a dress shirt that doesn’t fit them like a poncho? A watch that doesn't hang off their wrist on both sides? We see you. Otherwise known as hardgainers or ectomorphs, these are men who feel like they can’t bulk up even after hitting the gym regularly. But they can gain weight and add muscle mass, provided they’re willing to take the time to do so. “Americans just want a quick fix,” says Christen Cooper, registered dietician and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at Pace University. “The first thing I tell people, especially guys shooting for these huge muscles, is that to do it right, you need to have a little more patience.”

Read the full GQ article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Consumer Reports featured CHP Professor Christen Cupples Cooper in "How to Eat Healthy When You Shop for Groceries Online"

10/08/2020

Consumer Reports featured CHP Professor Christen Cupples Cooper in "How to Eat Healthy When You Shop for Groceries Online"

And a recent update of the Nutrition Facts label makes it even more valuable for people trying to make healthier choices. “Now, the number of calories per serving is in larger, bolder type; added sugar amounts must be declared, and actual amounts of key vitamins are listed,” says Christen Cupples Cooper, EdD, RDN, founding director and chair of the nutrition and dietetics program at Pace University in New York. “This could be helpful if you have a specific dietary need like celiac disease or lactose intolerance and want to narrow down what products could be suitable,” Cooper says.

Read the full Consumer Reports article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Today’s Dietician featured CHP Professor Christen Cupples Cooper's piece: "Food Insecurity During COVID-19"

09/23/2020

Today’s Dietician featured CHP Professor Christen Cupples Cooper's piece: "Food Insecurity During COVID-19"

An Overview of Nutrition’s Importance, the Impact on the US Food Supply, and the Role RDs May Play in the Future

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as of this writing, the COVID-19 global pandemic has resulted in nearly 5 million confirmed cases and 160,000 deaths in the United States alone. The health threat of the pandemic and the directives put in place to control it—social distancing, sheltering at home, and limiting business and school activities—have altered food accessibility, safety, and prices worldwide.1

The United States’ complex food system, in which many products are grown or manufactured far from its end consumers, struggled to adopt new ways of doing business with reduced staffing, new safety procedures, and a declining global economy.2

Good nutrition is a pillar of resilience in times of crisis.2 A lack of nutritious food puts individuals at a disadvantage for preventing and fighting the coronavirus. Adequate macronutrient and micronutrient intake, particularly of iron, zinc, and vitamins B6, B12, A, and E, can help prevent and fight infection by boosting immune function.3 These are important for triggering, interaction, differentiation, and functional expression of immune cells.2 In an article published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition in April 2020, Muscogiuri and colleagues recommended a Mediterranean-style diet featuring important immune-boosting foods, especially antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables, to boost immunity against COVID-19.4

Optimal nutrition also supports good mental health and can help individuals cope with the anxiety, uncertainty, and psychological stress posed by COVID-19.5 Nicole Eichinger, RD, LD, owner of Nutrition’s My Life, LLC, in San Diego, reports that the vast majority of her clients have sought help for stress reduction, better sleep, and better gut health during the crisis. She says stress likely led to cases and relapses of numerous conditions among clients. “I’ve had someone who had her [thyroid-stimulating hormone] double since COVID-19. I saw autoimmune disorders and someone who might have had a Lyme disease relapse,” Eichinger says.

Such stories are a reminder that helping clients focus on nutrient-dense foods amid their immensely altered daily routines is crucial.

Since the stresses of the pandemic may lead individuals to revert to less healthful coping behaviors, good nutrition is particularly important for those with alcohol misuse and eating disorders.6 Food quality and quantity also play important roles in overall health during COVID-19. In a time of crisis, a craving for comfort foods, especially high-calorie, nutrient-poor varieties, can lead to health issues that last well beyond the pandemic.4

Read the full Today’s Dietician article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Bustle featured Professor Christen Cupples Cooper of the College of Health Professions in "Why you feel hungover even if you didn't drink"

08/27/2020

Bustle featured Professor Christen Cupples Cooper of the College of Health Professions in "Why you feel hungover even if you didn't drink"

According to Christen Cupples Cooper, Ed.D., R.D., a professor at the College of Health Professions at Pace University, hot weather, sports, illnesses that cause diarrhea and vomiting, and simply not taking in enough liquids can lead to varying degrees of dehydration, which can make you feel hungover. "Mild dehydration can lead to brain confusion, fatigue, dizziness and irritability," Cooper tells Bustle, also likely describing many of your mornings.

Read the full Bustle article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Examiner News featured College of Health Professions experts Professor Christen Cupples Cooper and Professor Jessica Tosto in "Be Honest, About to Lose Your Mind Amidst Corona? Listen Up to These Pace Experts"

03/30/2020

The Examiner News featured College of Health Professions experts Professor Christen Cupples Cooper and Professor Jessica Tosto in "Be Honest, About to Lose Your Mind Amidst Corona? Listen Up to These Pace Experts"

Staying sane, centered and healthy in the new COVID-19 world, can be a challenge, but experts from Pace University’s College of Health Professions say that channeling anxiety into productive activity can provide solace and sanity.

From cooking with your children to taking time out for mental health moments, Pace University experts this week suggested a variety of techniques to take your minds off the barrage of unsettling news.

“During this time of uncertainty, try to conserve your energy to stay healthy rather than using energy for panic and worry,’’ said Professor Christen Cupples Cooper, EdD, RD, Director of the College of Health Professions Dietetics and Nutrition Program. “It can be difficult, but it’s definitely doable, and even necessary during these challenging times.”

Here are some suggestions from Professor Cooper:

Eat healthfully.  Make comfort foods such as stews, soups, and chili. Chili is a perfect dish for using leftover veggies and beans.  Broccoli and tomatoes with two onions, frozen corn, frozen lima beans, canned black beans and chickpeas and an extra-large can of salsa make the best chili ever! Spices are healthy. Add cilantro, chili powder, curry powder, cumin and black pepper. Experiment with your dishes. Remember, focus on healthful ingredients. This chili is loaded with nutrients that contain disease-fighting properties, has an interesting kick, and it’s filling.

Eat your fresh foods first. No one knows how long we’ll have limited access to ingredients, so eat what is in your fridge first and go to your canned and frozen goods next. This way, you maximize taste and minimize waste.

Freeze Fruits that are past their prime for smoothies. If you have fresh fruits that are past their prime (eg black bananas) put them in the freezer to make smoothies or banana bread.  Bruised or too soft apples are great for making applesauce or apple muffins.  Buying frozen fruits like berries or mangos are also great for making smoothies.

Make a weekly meal plan.  This will help you utilize your ingredients most efficiently and take the guess work out of what you will be eating each day or for each meal. It can also help you to use leftovers. (Leftover grilled chicken is great for making chicken salad or stir fry the next day.)

Bring kids into the fold. If your house is like mine, the kids are glum and bored. It’s a good time to show them how to cook! It’s a skill that they will certainly need, and it gives you an extra set of hands for chopping, mixing, and tasting. Depending on where they are with their cooking skills, start relatively small with things like pasta and veggies and progress to meat and fish.

Have a cook-off. Another neat trick to get kids involved is getting them to rate which dish or what food combination they like most. Having a cook off is another great activity. Lay out ingredients and have each child cook their own version of the same dish and then compare and contrast.

So many of us are working from home these days giving us unlimited access to our kitchens. Also, many people have been stocking up on food and snacks so they may have an abundance of foods that they wouldn’t typically have in the house, increasing temptation to eat.

Professor Jessica Tosto, MS, RD, CNSC, of Pace University’s College of Health Professions had these suggestions for helping to avoid overeating and maintain a healthy diet.

Set up a workspace that is not in or near your kitchen.  Putting some physical distance between yourself and your snacks can limit those frequent trips to the fridge.

Read the full The Examiner News article.

 

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Patch featured Pace College of Health Professions experts in "How to Stay Sane, Centered, and Healthy in the COVID-19 Reality"

03/30/2020

Patch featured Pace College of Health Professions experts in "How to Stay Sane, Centered, and Healthy in the COVID-19 Reality"

Staying sane, centered and healthy in the new COVID-19 world, can be a challenge, but experts from Pace University's College of Health Professions say that channeling anxiety into productive activity can provide solace and sanity.

From cooking with your children to taking time out for mental health moments, Pace University experts this week suggested a variety of techniques to take your minds off the barrage of unsettling news.

"During this time of uncertainty, try to conserve your energy to stay healthy rather than using energy for panic and worry,'' said Professor Christen Cupples Cooper, EdD, RD, Director of the College of Health Professions Dietetics and Nutrition Program. "It can be difficult, but it's definitely doable, and even necessary during these challenging times."

Here are some suggestions from Professor Cooper:

Eat healthfully. Make comfort foods such as stews, soups, and chili. Chili is a perfect dish for using leftover veggies and beans. Broccoli and tomatoes with two onions, frozen corn, frozen lima beans, canned black beans and chickpeas and an extra-large can of salsa make the best chili ever! Spices are healthy. Add cilantro, chili powder, curry powder, cumin and black pepper. Experiment with your dishes. Remember, focus on healthful ingredients. This chili is loaded with nutrients that contain disease-fighting properties, has an interesting kick, and it's filling. 

Eat your fresh foods first. No one knows how long we'll have limited access to ingredients, so eat what is in your fridge first and go to your canned and frozen goods next. This way, you maximize taste and minimize waste.

Freeze Fruits that are past their prime for smoothies. If you have fresh fruits that are past their prime (eg black bananas) put them in the freezer to make smoothies or banana bread. Bruised or too soft apples are great for making applesauce or apple muffins. Buying frozen fruits like berries or mangos are also great for making smoothies.

Make a weekly meal plan. This will help you utilize your ingredients most efficiently and take the guess work out of what you will be eating each day or for each meal. It can also help you to use leftovers. (Leftover grilled chicken is great for making chicken salad or stir fry the next day.)

Bring kids into the fold. If your house is like mine, the kids are glum and bored. It's a good time to show them how to cook! It's a skill that they will certainly need, and it gives you an extra set of hands for chopping, mixing, and tasting. Depending on where they are with their cooking skills, start relatively small with things like pasta and veggies and progress to meat and fish.

Have a cook-off. Another neat trick to get kids involved is getting them to rate which dish or what food combination they like most. Having a cook off is another great activity. Lay out ingredients and have each child cook their own version of the same dish and then compare and contrast.

So many of us are working from home these days giving us unlimited access to our kitchens. Also, many people have been stocking up on food and snacks so they may have an abundance of foods that they wouldn't typically have in the house, increasing temptation to eat.

Professor Jessica Tosto, MS, RD, CNSC, of Pace University's College of Health Professions had these suggestions for helping to avoid overeating and maintain a healthy diet.

Set up a workspace that is not in or near your kitchen. Putting some physical distance between yourself and your snacks can limit those frequent trips to the fridge.

Keep healthier foods and snacks in easy access locations. Cut up veggies like carrots sticks, celery, peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, cherry tomatoes, and sugar snap peas and keep them in a Tupperware in the fridge so you can quickly grab them when you are hungry. Pair with low calorie dips or hummus.

Stay hydrated! Be sure you are drinking plenty of water, seltzer, and other non-sugar sweetened beverages. Fill up a pitcher or thermos of water and keep it close by to help you achieve your goal of 8 cups per day.

Be aware of why you're eating. Many people have been stocking up on food and snacks so they may have an abundance of foods that they wouldn't typically have in the house and therefore temptations are more abundant too.

If you are eating because you are bored, try going for a walk or reading a book or doing a puzzle. If you are eating because you feel anxious or stressed, try calling a friend or doing some mindfulness exercises.

Be creative! If you are stuck at home, this is a great time to experiment with new recipes or new foods you find in the grocery store when your usual choices are out of stock

"Finally, don't beat yourself up if your diet is less than ideal right now! However, be cautious of using these unusual times as an excuse to overindulge in food and especially alcohol,'' said Tosto. 

Read the full Patch article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed