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The Chronicle of Higher Education | PACE UNIVERSITY

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The Chronicle of Higher Education featured Pace University in "Here’s a List of Colleges’ Plans for Reopening in the Fall"

04/30/2020

The Chronicle of Higher Education featured Pace University in "Here’s a List of Colleges’ Plans for Reopening in the Fall"

Pace University: "It is our hope and intention to resume our regular schedule of face-to-face classes across all three of our campuses for fall 2020," the provost wrote. "But ultimately that decision will not be ours to make."

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The Chronicle of Higher Education featured Dean Horace Anderson in "Transitions"

01/09/2020

The Chronicle of Higher Education featured Dean Horace Anderson in "Transitions"

Appointments, resignations, retirements, awards, deaths
 

Horace E. Anderson Jr., interim dean of the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, has been named to the post permanently.

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The Chronicle of Higher Education featured Karl Coplan, director of environmental litigation at Pace University’s law school in "The Thanksgiving-Winter Break Boomerang: Is All That Travel Really Necessary?"

12/11/2019

The Chronicle of Higher Education featured Karl Coplan, director of environmental litigation at Pace University’s law school in "The Thanksgiving-Winter Break Boomerang: Is All That Travel Really Necessary?"

Other experts also had ideas. Arielle Helmick, managing director of the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society, suggested institutions evaluate how they’re enabling climate change and then take steps like divesting from fossil fuels. Kevin J.H. Dettmar, director of the humanities center at Pomona College, started purchasing carbon offsets from the National Forest Foundation to balance out the emissions produced by visiting speakers. And Karl Coplan, director of environmental litigation at Pace University’s law school, went one step further, suggesting that faculty could teleconference instead of traveling long distances for conferences or speaking engagements.

All agreed that the role for higher education might not be in vastly reducing carbon emissions but in setting an example. “There's no magic bullet for climate change,” Thompson said. “It's going to require lots of people to do things that require people to solve the problem. Whatever contribution universities can make, needs to be made.”

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"The Chronicle of Higher Education" featured Richard Shadick, Director of Pace University’s Counseling Center in "Overburdened mental health counselors look after students"

09/19/2019

"The Chronicle of Higher Education" featured Richard Shadick, Director of Pace University’s Counseling Center in "Overburdened mental health counselors look after students"

...Expectations of counseling services, on the part of universities, students, parents, courts, and the public, are unrealistic, said Richard Shadick, director of Pace University’s Counseling Center. The centers are expected to shoulder the wave of illness, trauma, and unfortunate circumstances that come to their doors when it should be the shared responsibility of faculty, administration, families, and — most of all — the students themselves. “College is a place,” he said by phone, “where young adults should face challenges and learn from these challenges. A university can be helpful in supporting that education, but it’s a partnership.”

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"The Chronicle of Higher Education" featured Pace’s Nactel program in "Why One Advocate Believes the Phrase ‘Go Back to School’ Needs to Go"

09/11/2019

"The Chronicle of Higher Education" featured Pace’s Nactel program in "Why One Advocate Believes the Phrase ‘Go Back to School’ Needs to Go"

‘Badges’ for working students.

Cini, formerly the provost at the University of Maryland University College, itself a pioneer in serving adult students, has been at CAEL for just over a year. Since then, the organization has been advancing on a few projects.

The newest is the one that first prompted my call to Cini: a move to begin offering badges to students who take courses under a consortium developed 20 years ago by CAEL, telecommunications companies and unions, and Pace University. While the consortium known as Nactel (it now stands for National Alliance for Communications,Technology, Education, and Learning) has developed courses leading to certificates, associates, bachelor’s, and master’s degrees, Cini said that it decided to add badges to the mix as another incentive to students in a period when enrollments have not been growing. (Last year Pace enrolled just over 300 students in Nactel-developed courses.)

Adults in particular might appreciate the badges, Cini says, because they can be earned to acknowledge “a smaller chunk of learning” in less time than it takes for a degree or even a certificate. In my “Career-Ready Education” report, I drew a lot of lessons from Nactel’s decades of experience in working with colleges and employers. And I’m a sucker for experiments in alternative credentials. But I’d be more interested in this Nactel badge deal if it came with some guaranteed benefits from employers, (like the Capital CoLAB ones in digital technology that I wrote about this spring).

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