main navigation
my pace

CNN | PACE UNIVERSITY

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

CNN featured Dyson Professor Darrin Porcher in "CNN Newsroom"

06/19/2020

CNN featured Dyson Professor Darrin Porcher in "CNN Newsroom"

Darrin Porcher is a retired New York City police lieutenant. He says many officers now feel as though they are on trial.

DARRIN PORCHER, FORMER NYPD LIEUTENANT: They feel as if they're not wanted. They're not needed. Nor are they being accepted.

Read the full CNN article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

CNN featured Lubin School of Business Professor Andrew Coggins in "The Coronavirus Economy"

03/06/2020

CNN featured Lubin School of Business Professor Andrew Coggins in "The Coronavirus Economy"

Andrew Coggins speaks to CNN about the outbreak hurting the cruising industry.

Watch the CNN news clip.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"CNN" featured Environmental Law student Robin Happel ’22 in "What happened during CNN's climate town hall and what it means for 2020"

09/06/2019

"CNN" featured Environmental Law student Robin Happel ’22 in "What happened during CNN's climate town hall and what it means for 2020"

CNN's marathon town hall Wednesday night put the climate crisis closer to the center of a presidential election than ever before.

Ten Democratic candidates took to the stage as Hurricane Dorian menaced the East Coast and at a time when the impact of a warming Earth is no longer just a vision of a catastrophic future but is increasingly visible.

At times, candidates waged a bidding war to show liberal activists their plan was the most audacious -- and even expensive. But with an eye on November 2020, others warned against throwing the economy out of the window.

The contenders, who all embrace the science of climate change, offered voters an alternative to a President who views climate change as a "hoax" and slams their "dreams and windmills."

But Donald Trump's mocking tweets and GOP rapid response attacks during the event reflected the risks Democrats run: While going big on climate is the price of entry in their presidential race, it's yet to be proven as a shrewd general election strategy.

Watch the Climate Change Town Hall

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Channel 3000" featured Pace University Lubin School of Business Professor and Associate Dean, Randi Priluck, in "Instagram Got Us Hooked on Likes. What happens When They're Gone?"

08/21/2019

"Channel 3000" featured Pace University Lubin School of Business Professor and Associate Dean, Randi Priluck, in "Instagram Got Us Hooked on Likes. What happens When They're Gone?"

(CNN) - Did you like my Instagram photo? Is now a good time to post? Should I delete my picture that only got 20 likes?

Posting an Instagram photo can be stressful for people who care about likes. But in a move to reduce some of that pressure, Instagram is hiding likes for some users in a handful of countries including Canada, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Brazil, Australia and New Zealand.

CNN Business spoke with users in countries with the test -- the majority of which felt positively about this effort to improve wellbeing on the app. One study found Instagram is the most detrimental social networking app for young people's mental health, such as negatively impacting body image.

"My younger sisters are like 'Oh My God, would you go on and like my picture? Hardly anybody has liked it,'" said 34-year-old Cara McVeigh, who is a conference and events manager at a college in Dublin. "I definitely think [removing likes] will take away from that pressure."

Likes, which appear as hearts on Instagram, are often used as a measure of popularity, leading some users to tie them to their self-esteem.

"It's like a dopamine hit," said Shalome Pinto, a 28-year-old Master's student studying urban design in Melbourne, Australia. "It's instant validation for what you post. Someone is validating what you've written or worn. You instantly feel good about what you wore and how you look."

But when someone doesn't get enough likes, it can have the opposite effect.

The test removes the total number of likes on photos and videos on the main feed, profiles and permalink pages. However, the owner of the account can still see their own likes. When someone you follow has liked someone else's photo, it will say "[name of Instagram account] and others" under the post where likes would typically appear. Users can then click to see a list of the users who have liked it, although they won't see a number saying how many.

"The recent change to likes is a great thing," said 27-year-old Chris Grundy, a freelance photographer who lives in Sydney, Australia.

"It got to a stage where people didn't appreciate a photo for the content they saw. It was more about this person has 5,000 likes and judging a photo based on that ... and people were comparing themselves to others, which has led to a lot of mental health issues," he added."People are more concerned with how many likes they get themselves," said Sasha Fekula, a 23-year-old American currently living in Sydney, Australia. "If likes are this big deal to me, I can still feel validated or not."

Randi Priluck, a professor and associate dean at Pace University focused on social media and mobile marketing, agrees.

"For teenagers, this is great because it would no longer highlight levels of popularity of themselves against other kids," she previously told CNN Business. "But they're still going to see their own likes. People are very driven by rewards so they're still going to be competing for those likes. It's not going to fully solve the problem."

But the move to hide likes could encourage users to post more "authentic" content without being concerned about how many likes it gets.

Erin Good, a 23-year-old American who works as an environmental consultant in Auckland, New Zealand, said in the past she's been guilty of posting a photo she thinks will get more likes instead of a photo she personally likes better.

"[Hiding likes] could influence people to post more of what they like," she said. "It'll be interesting to see if it does go through around the world, if there's a slight change in content."

An Instagram spokesperson said the company is waiting to see the results of this test before deciding whether to expand it to more countries.

Like other users, Good said she's conscious about what time she posts a photo to help maximize likes and how many people see it and suspects that won't change even if likes are hidden permanently.

"Especially living in New Zealand, I know if I post at 8 p.m. [my time], everyone back home is asleep, so I'm not going to post," Good said. "I don't think I'll change that now that the likes are hidden. I think it's more about wanting people to see what I'm up to."

Although the change is welcomed among some, it won't address other issues on the platform such as bullying or users comparing themselves to other people. Instagram said tackling bullying is a priority this year and has added new features such as a tool that tells users when their comment could be considered offensive before it's posted.

"Just because you don't see the likes, doesn't mean you can't see comments," said Niamh Quirke, a 26-year-old Instagram user who recently moved to New York from Ireland. "Words are harsh. People can still comment and say things that aren't nice."

"Likes is one part of it, but I don't think it's the cure to curing the culture around Instagram," she added.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"CNN" featured Pace President Marvin Krislov in "Here's what you need to know about the College Board's new SAT score"

05/20/2019

"CNN" featured Pace President Marvin Krislov in "Here's what you need to know about the College Board's new SAT score"

...The dashboard rating doesn't alter a student's SAT score. It shows how a student's' SAT score compares to those of other students in their school. It doesn't include personal characteristics beyond the test score.

Pace University President Marvin Krislov believes the score tells only part of a student's story.

"It won't let admissions officers know if the student has overcome a major disability or illness," he said in a statement. "Or if the student has experienced a significant loss. But it can be a useful new factor in a holistic admissions review."

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"CNN" featured an interview with Pace University student Lindita Kulla in "Breakiing News: Massive Fire Engulfs Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris"

04/16/2019

"CNN" featured an interview with Pace University student Lindita Kulla in "Breakiing News: Massive Fire Engulfs Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris"

American students on spring break in Paris describe Notre Dame fire

Two students on spring break in Paris witnessed the Notre Dame fire and discuss their reaction. 

Pace University student Lindita Kulla is in Paris and witnessed the burning of Notre Dame. 

Watch the news interview here: CNN News

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"CNN" interviewed Dyson's Criminal Justice Professor Darrin Porcher in "Pres. Tump: The Media Also Has A Responsibility to Set a Civil Tone"

10/30/2018

"CNN" interviewed Dyson's Criminal Justice Professor Darrin Porcher in "Pres. Tump: The Media Also Has A Responsibility to Set a Civil Tone"

Darrin Porcher was interviewed by CNN's Anderson Cooper regarding the mass mailings of bombs to political figures.

Watch CNN video clip.

 

 

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed