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Hoboken Girl featured College of Health Professions Professor Kate Worthington in "13 Local Nurses Who Deserve Some Serious Love on National Nurses Day"

05/07/2020

Hoboken Girl featured College of Health Professions Professor Kate Worthington in "13 Local Nurses Who Deserve Some Serious Love on National Nurses Day"

“When the coronavirus hit, Katie went straight to the frontline working on the COVID-positive unit at Morristown Medical Center. She’s been taking care of 30+ patients each shift and researching every new scientific journal as they get published. As a teacher for Pace University’s nursing masters program, she also helped make it a seamless transition to remote only learning. Mix the professional obligations with daycare being canceled for our three kids under three and you’ve got your superhero. Katie hasn’t missed a beat with work as well as continuing the education and learning activities of our children. Even though times are tough right now, Katie continues to be the one that helps our kids hit new milestones, answers all the virus-related questions of our family and friends, and push us to be optimistic about good times ahead,” Katie’s husband Michael shared.

Thank you to all of the nurses out there who are helping us each and every day! And thank you to everyone who nominated someone, too!

Read the full Hoboken Girl article.

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Patch featured College of Health Professions Professor Sophie R. Kaufman in "Pace University Professor teaches Mindfulness to Reduce Stress"

04/22/2020

Patch featured College of Health Professions Professor Sophie R. Kaufman in "Pace University Professor teaches Mindfulness to Reduce Stress"

As we all cope with the new reality of social distancing and quarantine in the COVID-19 era, it's important that we develop routines that promote our mental as well as our physical health, according to Sophie R. Kaufman, DPS, MBA of Pace University's College of Health Professions.

Kaufman, who is teaching a course on Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction at Pace, said stress and anxiety can drag down our immune system, making us more vulnerable to illness.

"Staying mentally fit is just as important as staying physically healthy,'' said Kaufman. "A large part of managing stress involves being in touch with our feelings and regulating our emotions.''

Read the full Patch article.

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Press Release: How to Stay Calm, Centered, and Healthy in the COVID-19

04/20/2020

Press Release: How to Stay Calm, Centered, and Healthy in the COVID-19

Pace University Expert Offers Tips from her Mindfulness Class

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. April 20, 2020 – As we all cope with the new reality of social distancing and quarantine in the COVID-19 era, it’s important that we develop routines that promote our mental as well as our physical health, according to Sophie R. Kaufman, DPS, MBA of Pace University’s College of Health Professions.

Kaufman, who is teaching a course on Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction at Pace, said stress and anxiety can drag down our immune system, making us more vulnerable to illness.

“Staying mentally fit is just as important as staying physically healthy,’’ said Kaufman. “A large part of managing stress involves being in touch with our feelings and regulating our emotions.’’

Kaufman is a CFM Qualified MBSR Teacher, trained at the University of Massachusetts Medical School Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Health Care, and Society (CFM). Kaufman has been practicing yoga and meditation for more than 20 years and has been training in MBSR at the CFM since 2015.

In her course, Kaufman explores mindfulness mediation as a practice to reduce stress and develop a greater balance in life. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction is based on the work of Jon Kabat-Zinn, who created a detailed curriculum for learning, practice, and even scientific research about mindfulness. Kabat-Zinn founded the Stress Reduction Clinic at the University of Massachusetts in 1979, to help people who were falling through the cracks in the healthcare system. His Center for Mindfulness at UMass Medical School has been the main driver of academic research, teacher training, and development of a worldwide community of mindfulness practitioners, and their banner program has been Kabat-Zinn’s Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, or MBSR. 

Kaufman teaches this practice in her course, which runs from April 23- June 11 and is open to the public (only a few spaces left). More information on MSRB and the course can be found on Pace University’s website.

Kaufman offers these exercises for coping with stress:

Practice STOP:

S-Stop

T-Take a breath

O-Observe – what you are feeling internally in the body (heart beating faster? Tension in the shoulders? Knot in the stomach?) and externally (alarming news, sounds, voices…)

P-Proceed or Pause again before proceeding

The STOP practice helps us practice pausing which is at the heart of mindfulness practice.

Recognize emotions while not identifying with them

Take a moment to notice emotions: do you feel unsettled? Anxious? Afraid? Angry? Depressed?

What sensations do you notice in the body? Tightness? Pain? Cold? Warm?

“Rather than pushing emotions and sensations away, simply practice being aware of them, observing them with curiosity, like clouds passing in the sky,” said Kaufman. “When emotions or sensations seem too intense, bringing the awareness to the breath, placing one hand on the chest and one hand on the belly, and simply breathing slowly – gently closing the eyes to allow focusing inward. Practice putting some distance between yourself and your emotions, gently letting go.”

Feel our interconnectedness, our common humanity:

“With social distancing, there may be a feeling of isolation, anxiety, particularly when living alone. Paradoxically recognize that we are all sharing this social distancing and we are actually more connected than ever,’’ said Kaufman. “Social distancing doesn’t mean social disconnection. Fortunately, in 2020 technology allows us to continue to foster social connection and a sense of community.”

Please look for additional health and mindfulness tips on Pace University’s website  or follow us on Twitter at @PaceUnews  

About Pace University
Pace University has a proud history of preparing its diverse student body for a lifetime of professional success as a result of its unique program that combines rigorous academics and real-world experiences. Pace is ranked the #1 private, four-year college in the nation for upward economic mobility by Harvard University’s Opportunity Insights, evidence of the transformative education the University provides. From its beginnings as an accounting school in 1906, Pace has grown to three campuses, enrolling 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in more than 150 majors and programs, across a range of disciplines: arts, sciences, business, health care, technology, law, education, and more. The university also has one of the most competitive performing arts programs in the country. Pace has a signature, newly renovated campus in New York City, located in the heart of vibrant Lower Manhattan, next to Wall Street and City Hall, and two campuses in Westchester County, New York: a 200-acre picturesque Pleasantville Campus and a Law School in White Plains. Follow us on Twitter or on the Pace News website.

 

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Post-Gazette featured physician assistant studies alumn Ross Morgan in "Shaler native providing COVID-19 screenings in a hectic New York City hospital"

04/15/2020

Post-Gazette featured physician assistant studies alumn Ross Morgan in "Shaler native providing COVID-19 screenings in a hectic New York City hospital"

On the day when New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced a one-day state record of 799 deaths from COVID-19, Ross Morgan was trying to prevent another one from occurring in New York City.

For the seventh consecutive day Thursday, the physician assistant and Shaler native was working in a makeshift pre-emergency room at Metropolitan Hospital in the East Harlem section of the borough of Manhattan. He was medically screening frightened patients to determine if their infection fears were symptom- or anxiety-based.

“An overwhelming number have symptoms brought on by fear. There’s a lot of subjective fever, and shortness of breath is common,” said Mr. Morgan, 30, who graduated in 2008 from Shaler Area High School, in 2012 from the University of Pittsburgh and in 2016 from Pace University in New York City with a master’s degree in physician assistant studies.

Read the full Post-Gazette article.

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The Examiner News featured College of Health Professions experts Professor Christen Cupples Cooper and Professor Jessica Tosto in "Be Honest, About to Lose Your Mind Amidst Corona? Listen Up to These Pace Experts"

03/30/2020

The Examiner News featured College of Health Professions experts Professor Christen Cupples Cooper and Professor Jessica Tosto in "Be Honest, About to Lose Your Mind Amidst Corona? Listen Up to These Pace Experts"

Staying sane, centered and healthy in the new COVID-19 world, can be a challenge, but experts from Pace University’s College of Health Professions say that channeling anxiety into productive activity can provide solace and sanity.

From cooking with your children to taking time out for mental health moments, Pace University experts this week suggested a variety of techniques to take your minds off the barrage of unsettling news.

“During this time of uncertainty, try to conserve your energy to stay healthy rather than using energy for panic and worry,’’ said Professor Christen Cupples Cooper, EdD, RD, Director of the College of Health Professions Dietetics and Nutrition Program. “It can be difficult, but it’s definitely doable, and even necessary during these challenging times.”

Here are some suggestions from Professor Cooper:

Eat healthfully.  Make comfort foods such as stews, soups, and chili. Chili is a perfect dish for using leftover veggies and beans.  Broccoli and tomatoes with two onions, frozen corn, frozen lima beans, canned black beans and chickpeas and an extra-large can of salsa make the best chili ever! Spices are healthy. Add cilantro, chili powder, curry powder, cumin and black pepper. Experiment with your dishes. Remember, focus on healthful ingredients. This chili is loaded with nutrients that contain disease-fighting properties, has an interesting kick, and it’s filling.

Eat your fresh foods first. No one knows how long we’ll have limited access to ingredients, so eat what is in your fridge first and go to your canned and frozen goods next. This way, you maximize taste and minimize waste.

Freeze Fruits that are past their prime for smoothies. If you have fresh fruits that are past their prime (eg black bananas) put them in the freezer to make smoothies or banana bread.  Bruised or too soft apples are great for making applesauce or apple muffins.  Buying frozen fruits like berries or mangos are also great for making smoothies.

Make a weekly meal plan.  This will help you utilize your ingredients most efficiently and take the guess work out of what you will be eating each day or for each meal. It can also help you to use leftovers. (Leftover grilled chicken is great for making chicken salad or stir fry the next day.)

Bring kids into the fold. If your house is like mine, the kids are glum and bored. It’s a good time to show them how to cook! It’s a skill that they will certainly need, and it gives you an extra set of hands for chopping, mixing, and tasting. Depending on where they are with their cooking skills, start relatively small with things like pasta and veggies and progress to meat and fish.

Have a cook-off. Another neat trick to get kids involved is getting them to rate which dish or what food combination they like most. Having a cook off is another great activity. Lay out ingredients and have each child cook their own version of the same dish and then compare and contrast.

So many of us are working from home these days giving us unlimited access to our kitchens. Also, many people have been stocking up on food and snacks so they may have an abundance of foods that they wouldn’t typically have in the house, increasing temptation to eat.

Professor Jessica Tosto, MS, RD, CNSC, of Pace University’s College of Health Professions had these suggestions for helping to avoid overeating and maintain a healthy diet.

Set up a workspace that is not in or near your kitchen.  Putting some physical distance between yourself and your snacks can limit those frequent trips to the fridge.

Read the full The Examiner News article.

 

 

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Patch featured Pace College of Health Professions experts in "How to Stay Sane, Centered, and Healthy in the COVID-19 Reality"

03/30/2020

Patch featured Pace College of Health Professions experts in "How to Stay Sane, Centered, and Healthy in the COVID-19 Reality"

Staying sane, centered and healthy in the new COVID-19 world, can be a challenge, but experts from Pace University's College of Health Professions say that channeling anxiety into productive activity can provide solace and sanity.

From cooking with your children to taking time out for mental health moments, Pace University experts this week suggested a variety of techniques to take your minds off the barrage of unsettling news.

"During this time of uncertainty, try to conserve your energy to stay healthy rather than using energy for panic and worry,'' said Professor Christen Cupples Cooper, EdD, RD, Director of the College of Health Professions Dietetics and Nutrition Program. "It can be difficult, but it's definitely doable, and even necessary during these challenging times."

Here are some suggestions from Professor Cooper:

Eat healthfully. Make comfort foods such as stews, soups, and chili. Chili is a perfect dish for using leftover veggies and beans. Broccoli and tomatoes with two onions, frozen corn, frozen lima beans, canned black beans and chickpeas and an extra-large can of salsa make the best chili ever! Spices are healthy. Add cilantro, chili powder, curry powder, cumin and black pepper. Experiment with your dishes. Remember, focus on healthful ingredients. This chili is loaded with nutrients that contain disease-fighting properties, has an interesting kick, and it's filling. 

Eat your fresh foods first. No one knows how long we'll have limited access to ingredients, so eat what is in your fridge first and go to your canned and frozen goods next. This way, you maximize taste and minimize waste.

Freeze Fruits that are past their prime for smoothies. If you have fresh fruits that are past their prime (eg black bananas) put them in the freezer to make smoothies or banana bread. Bruised or too soft apples are great for making applesauce or apple muffins. Buying frozen fruits like berries or mangos are also great for making smoothies.

Make a weekly meal plan. This will help you utilize your ingredients most efficiently and take the guess work out of what you will be eating each day or for each meal. It can also help you to use leftovers. (Leftover grilled chicken is great for making chicken salad or stir fry the next day.)

Bring kids into the fold. If your house is like mine, the kids are glum and bored. It's a good time to show them how to cook! It's a skill that they will certainly need, and it gives you an extra set of hands for chopping, mixing, and tasting. Depending on where they are with their cooking skills, start relatively small with things like pasta and veggies and progress to meat and fish.

Have a cook-off. Another neat trick to get kids involved is getting them to rate which dish or what food combination they like most. Having a cook off is another great activity. Lay out ingredients and have each child cook their own version of the same dish and then compare and contrast.

So many of us are working from home these days giving us unlimited access to our kitchens. Also, many people have been stocking up on food and snacks so they may have an abundance of foods that they wouldn't typically have in the house, increasing temptation to eat.

Professor Jessica Tosto, MS, RD, CNSC, of Pace University's College of Health Professions had these suggestions for helping to avoid overeating and maintain a healthy diet.

Set up a workspace that is not in or near your kitchen. Putting some physical distance between yourself and your snacks can limit those frequent trips to the fridge.

Keep healthier foods and snacks in easy access locations. Cut up veggies like carrots sticks, celery, peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, cherry tomatoes, and sugar snap peas and keep them in a Tupperware in the fridge so you can quickly grab them when you are hungry. Pair with low calorie dips or hummus.

Stay hydrated! Be sure you are drinking plenty of water, seltzer, and other non-sugar sweetened beverages. Fill up a pitcher or thermos of water and keep it close by to help you achieve your goal of 8 cups per day.

Be aware of why you're eating. Many people have been stocking up on food and snacks so they may have an abundance of foods that they wouldn't typically have in the house and therefore temptations are more abundant too.

If you are eating because you are bored, try going for a walk or reading a book or doing a puzzle. If you are eating because you feel anxious or stressed, try calling a friend or doing some mindfulness exercises.

Be creative! If you are stuck at home, this is a great time to experiment with new recipes or new foods you find in the grocery store when your usual choices are out of stock

"Finally, don't beat yourself up if your diet is less than ideal right now! However, be cautious of using these unusual times as an excuse to overindulge in food and especially alcohol,'' said Tosto. 

Read the full Patch article.

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WNBC featured College of Health Professions Professor Andrea Sonenberg in "News 4 New York at 11"

03/27/2020

WNBC featured College of Health Professions Professor Andrea Sonenberg in "News 4 New York at 11"

CHP Professor Andrea Sonenberg tells WNBC that she believes it’s her ethical and social responsibility to volunteer with other health professionals to help with the coronavirus response in New York.

A professor at Pace University answered the governor's call. “I believe it's my professional, ethical and social -- ethical duty and social responsibility.” She says she's not surprised that tens of thousands of her colleagues also stepped up, because they're a special group of people dedicated to the public's health.

Watch the WNBC news clip.

 

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