main navigation
my pace

COVID-19 | PACE UNIVERSITY

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Medium featured Dyson Professor Brenna Hassinger-Das piece: "Technological Tradeoffs During COVID-19"

10/15/2020

Medium featured Dyson Professor Brenna Hassinger-Das piece: "Technological Tradeoffs During COVID-19"

The educational landscape has shifted radically, and these changes may not go away anytime soon — if ever.

As a children and media researcher, I have spent a lot of time since the COVID-19 pandemic began thinking about screen time. By April 2020, school closures affected 1.2 billion children worldwide — and research suggests that half of all US children are continuing to learn online this fall. Online learning platforms — such as Zoom, YouTube, and a variety of educational apps — have become ubiquitous for children from preschool through high school age. The educational landscape has shifted radically, and these changes may not go away anytime soon — if ever.

However, pre-pandemic, children were already using screen devices on an increasingly regular basis — with mobile device use tripling from 2013–2017. There has also been a rise in the amount of child-directed content that is available across multiple devices and platforms. Yet, I am of the belief that current data doesn’t conclusively suggest that screen time causes significant, detrimental effects in children. Research does suggest that behavioral and health problems may relate to excessive screen time — but causal connections are not clear. Based on my understanding of the literature, in March 2020, I advised caregivers of one screen time rule that it is okay to break (previous daily screen time limits), one rule caregivers can bend (most restrictions on where/when to use devices), and one to keep (screen-free bedtime).

I have tried to take my own advice as the pandemic wears on. As a pre-tenure faculty member and the mother of a six-year-old, I am now teaching on Zoom while my child completes virtual first grade. I definitely started making trade-offs regarding technology use that I would not have previously considered so that I can write and teach — with my child consuming far more digital media than usual. We have found a routine that works for us, and I supplement the screen time with hands-on and outdoor activities. I often explain to my child that this is not forever — but how do we really know? The uncertainty is one the big factors that is causing a lot of stress for parents like myself, and I wish I had the answers.

Read the Medium article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

College Magazine featured Pace University in "Top 10 Colleges Deserving Recognition for their Response to COVID-19"

10/15/2020

College Magazine featured Pace University in "Top 10 Colleges Deserving Recognition for their Response to COVID-19"

4. Pace University

While New York City may no longer be Coronavirus capital, precautions and safety measures remain enforced at Pace University. The school implemented prorated housing and meal plan refunds for students along with most classes being pass/fail for the Spring 2020 semester (though the housing refunds are limited to university-funded dorms only). Pace’s Fall semester plan came out the earliest, being debuted on April 24. Its final draft announced mostly online classes. “I do think Pace is making good decisions. Classes are hybrid so technically all online,” sophomore Gianni Bove said. “We aren’t allowed to go to other people’s rooms in the dorms or other dorm buildings that aren’t our own.” Campus safety will further remain enforced through mandatory mask-wearing. Pace so far distributed $6.3 million of the $8.9 million CARES Act money they received. They deemed 16,000 eligible students with individual packages capping at a whopping $2,600. Finally, the school’s coronavirus updates come from an extension of their university website, though it doesn’t appear to update daily. A minor inconvenience in a majorly safe plan!

 

Read the full College Magazine article.