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"News12 featured Brian Anderson, Pace’s director of Emergency Management and Environmental Health and Safety in "Gov. Cuomo pushes colleges, universities in state to give more COVID-19 tests

02/22/2021

"News12 featured Brian Anderson, Pace’s director of Emergency Management and Environmental Health and Safety in "Gov. Cuomo pushes colleges, universities in state to give more COVID-19 tests

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is pushing for colleges and universities in the state to give more COVID-19 tests so that they can stay open.

He says with more testing, he hopes students won't have to flip-flop on a whim between in-person and remote learning.

Pace University, like other local colleges, let all students back on campus last semester. But just before the holidays, Pace switched to completely remote classes because of an uptick in cases.

For this spring semester, Pace ramped up its testing from 25% to the majority of students.

Under Cuomo's new guidelines, colleges and universities that test at least 25% of people on-campus will not be required to shut down as long as their positivity rate isn't over 5% throughout the course of two weeks.

A shutdown means only online classes, dining halls switch to take out only and no sports or in-person extracurricular activities.

Colleges and universities that test less than 25% of their population must shut down if more than 100 people, or 5%, are positive over the course of two weeks.

Watch the News12 clip.

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Forbes featured President Marvin Krislov's latest column "The Pandemic Has Been Tough, But We’re Ready For What Comes Next"

02/18/2021

Forbes featured President Marvin Krislov's latest column "The Pandemic Has Been Tough, But We’re Ready For What Comes Next"

Last week, I delivered a State of the University address. The annual speech is a chance for me to look back at where we’ve been and look ahead to where we’re going. This year, it felt especially important to gather our community and take stock. And I realized that what we’ve gone through over the last year at Pace University is a microcosm for what we’ve gone through over the year as a country.

The past year has been hard—hard for us as individuals, hard for higher education, hard for our country. At colleges and universities across the country, we’ve dealt with remote education and remote life, with social distance and occasional lockdowns, with the risk of infection and, in some cases, positive cases. We’ve worried about keeping students on track in their studies, about maintaining enrollment, about balancing our budgets amid decreased revenue and increased costs.

And yet when I sat down to reflect on the year behind us, and to look at the one ahead, I found myself optimistic. What I saw was, in fact, a year of triumph. As it turns out, 2020 was a year that leaves me deeply optimistic for our future—not despite what we went through, but because of it. 

The last year reminded me that the people of Pace, like people across the country, are tough.

We didn’t give up. We didn’t give in. Some members of our community dealt with truly terrible situations—sickness, lost work, loneliness, even the loss of loved ones. We mourned the losses, we supported each other—and, most important, we kept working to meet our goals. I suspect this is what happened at colleges and universities nationwide.

Faculty had to pivot in the space of days to entirely new ways of teaching, even while dealing with enormous new obligations in their own lives. Staff and administrators kept the University operating, even as some had to come in every day to keep our systems running and our buildings secure. Our students never forgot the importance of working toward their degrees. Some faced barriers to travel, some faced financial hardship, some tested positive and had to be isolated. But they kept working, and they kept learning. 

And, looking back, I see that we got so much done.

Despite the pandemic, last spring we graduated 2,224 students.

Over the summer, nearly 2,200 new students went through virtual Orientation. And close to 700 faculty members signed up for training to learn how to maximize the possibilities of virtual instruction.

In the fall semester, we processed nearly 10,000 COVID-19 tests through our community testing program. So far this spring semester, we’ve processed another 5,000 and counting.

We hosted 224,714 Pace Zoom meetings since March of last year, with participants connecting from 168 countries and logging a total of 131,879,669 meeting minutes.

Across the country, everyone did what had to be done to make it through this tough year.

We all also kept doing everything we normally do. At Pace, faculty won grants. Students won awards. We recruited a new class of students. We brought on new deans. We raised money. We expanded our online offerings.

Taking stock of all those accomplishments, I know we’re ready to take on the challenges of moving forward. I think that’s true for all of us in this country.

Nationally, we’re ramping up vaccine distribution, and we’re raring to restart our economy. Here at Pace, we’re building an ambitious new strategic plan to move us forward. We’re renewing our commitment to building a University where everyone is included, and everyone is valued. Just last week, thanks to the tremendous generosity of our trustee Barry Gosin, CEO of the global real estate firm Newmark, we announced the Barry M. and Jackie Gosin Center for Equity and Inclusion at Pace University, which will serve as a hub for our work on diversity, equity, and inclusion.

We’re all ready to move forward.

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy promised to send Americans to the moon not because it was easy, he said, but because it was hard. Because it was a goal that would, he said, “serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills.”

This last year was hard, and it brought out the best of our energies and skills. Now it is time for our moonshot: To leverage that strength, to value our people, and to lift everyone up. To join together, focus our energies, and boldly move forward.

The lesson of the last year is that we can do it.

Read the Forbes article.

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The Hill featured President Marvin Krislov's column: "An 'upskill bill' can be the GI Bill for a post-COVID workforce"

02/01/2021

The Hill featured President Marvin Krislov's column: "An 'upskill bill' can be the GI Bill for a post-COVID workforce"

President Biden took office with four top priorities: combating COVID-19, rebuilding the economy, addressing racial inequity and fighting climate change. Starting right away, he has promised action to ramp up vaccine production and distribution and provide much needed support for families who are struggling.

One practical priority will help address all those goals: getting all of America, from all backgrounds, back to work — in the kinds of good-paying jobs that serve the needs of today and tomorrow and have proven resilient through the last year of pandemic. 

It’s why I believe Congress should include among its stimulus measures an 'upskill Bill', a major investment in higher education for all Americans. 

Just as the GI Bill changed America for the better in the decades after World War II, the upskill bill can transform America after the coronavirus, building an equitable workforce trained to address crucial challenges like healthcare and decarbonization. 

The last year has made clear the benefits accruing to the skilled workforce. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that only about five percent of service workers have been able to work from home, while more than half of information workers did. Beyond that, skilled workers didn’t see job losses in the same volume and it’s less likely that their jobs will simply no longer exist. Automation, artificial intelligence and machine learning were already threatening many unskilled jobs; the crisis has only accelerated that shift. 

This period has clarified things we’ve long known to be true. College graduates earn far more in their lifetimes than those without college degrees because the skills they learn in college — not just subject-specific expertise but also soft skills like critical thinking, leadership and communication — make them much more valuable to employers. Even some level of college education helps increase lifetime earnings and we’re increasingly seeing that those who already have degrees need and want new training to prepare them for different kinds of work.

Read the full Hill article.

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Westchester Lawyer Magazine featured executive director of Pace Land Use Center Jessica Bacher's piece "Haub Law’s Response to Covid-19"

01/06/2021

Westchester Lawyer Magazine featured executive director of Pace Land Use Center Jessica Bacher's piece "Haub Law’s Response to Covid-19"

Westchester County was home to the original hot spot of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States; so, it is entirely fitting that the county’s only law school, Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University (Haub Law), has responded by ramping up our programs in the fight against the virus.

Careers related to the health care and bio-tech industries, particularly near the Law School’s campus in Westchester, are on the rise. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that employment in healthcare occupations in expected to grow 15% from 2019 to 2029 which is much faster than the average for all occupations, adding about 2.4 million jobs.

Read the full Westchester Lawyer Magazine article.

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Forbes featured President Marvin Krislov's latest column: "Lessons Learned From A Semester On Campus During The Pandemic"

12/03/2020

Forbes featured President Marvin Krislov's latest column: "Lessons Learned From A Semester On Campus During The Pandemic"

We did it. We made it through the Fall 2020 semester.

In normal times, simply surviving is no great feat. But in this deeply unusual year, achieving something resembling normalcy is a real accomplishment. At Pace University, after a remote spring and a summer of planning, we welcomed students, faculty, and staff back to campus for the fall — and we’re completing the semester as planned.

How did we do it? With preparation, communication, and a commitment to success.

To start, we took seriously all the warnings we received. Back in March, we moved all our classes to remote before we were required to do so by the state, and soon thereafter we told all employees to work from home and students that they wouldn’t be able to continue living in our residence halls. (We made exceptions for students with extenuating circumstances who needed to continue in university-provided housing.) 

Then we spent the spring and summer improving our operations and planning for a new kind of future. 

Our faculty quickly pivoted to remote instruction in March, and then over the summer they worked hard to learn not only how to deliver classes online but how to leverage the advantages of digital technology for even better instruction. Our support services — counseling, tutoring, advising, Career Services — all moved quickly online in the spring, too, and then worked to optimize for digital delivery. 

Our COVID-19 Task Force met every day through the spring and summer, coordinating efforts across the University. We upgraded air filters and purchased Plexiglass barriers. We prepared directional signage and brought in tents to create outdoor spaces. We rethought our academic calendar, moving up the start of the semester and eliminating all holidays, so we could have on-campus instruction finished by Thanksgiving and the anticipated new wave. We developed testing regimens, and, as New York State imposed a 14-quarantine for those arriving here from many parts of the country, we made arrangements to put up hundreds of students in area hotel rooms, and test them all, to make sure they were healthy when they arrived on campus. We made sure we were prepared for different scenarios, and we regularly updated our community on what we knew —and what we didn’t — and what we were planning.

Our students, our faculty, and our staff respected our guidelines. We offered classes in-person, online, and in some combination of the two, so that we could reduce density, maintain distance, and allow those classes that need to meet in person —like labs and performance studies — to do so. We required everyone in our community to complete a health questionnaire every day in order to come to campus, and we selected a random 25 percent of those coming to campus for testing each week.

Read the full Forbes article.

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