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Daily Voice featured Pace University in "Video: Pace University Partners With John F. Kennedy Catholic HS On Business Curriculum"

12/17/2019

Daily Voice featured Pace University in "Video: Pace University Partners With John F. Kennedy Catholic HS On Business Curriculum"

Students at John F. Kennedy Catholic High School in Northern Westchester will now have the opportunity to earn college credits while learning valuable business lessons through Pace University.

The school and university will expand their partnership in the spring, allowing Pace business professors to teach college-level classes such as Business 101, Business Law, and Managerial and Organizational Concepts at Kennedy Catholic in Somers.

Students can earn up to nine college credits before graduating.

“We are bringing a business education to students who might not traditionally be exposed to a business education,” said Professor Randi Priluck, associate dean of undergraduate programs at Pace University and director of the master’s program in Social Media and Mobile Marketing at the Lubin School of Business. “They get to see what a real college class and college curriculum is like.”

Advanced Placement courses remain common in high schools, but this partnership is special due to the fact that it is taught by actual Pace University professors. Part of the curriculum includes managing a virtual coffee shop called Pace Cafe, where students learn about sales, accounting, inventory, marketing and more.

Students who complete these business courses with a 3.0 GPA by the end of their junior year will be considered for priority admission into the university.

As a whole, the program is being praised for providing students with real-life business experience.

“It is important for Kennedy to prepare students to participate in the economy, and the sooner they have a feel for the ‘real world’ the better off they will be,” said Robert Santini, a social studies teacher at Kennedy High School. “Re-emphasizing the basic notion that they need to prepare to participate in the economy, and ultimately society at large, and then giving them the options to begin doing so at the high school level is a worthy goal since a more productive working population is better for everyone.”

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"Daily Voice" featured Pace alumni Bartek Szymanski in "Norwalk Actor Makes TV Debut On NBC's 'Chicago PD'"

10/24/2019

"Daily Voice" featured Pace alumni Bartek Szymanski in "Norwalk Actor Makes TV Debut On NBC's 'Chicago PD'"

An actor and director from Norwalk will soon make his television debut on the NBC series, “Chicago PD.”

Bartek Szymanski will guest star in the fifth episode of the seventh season of the show, premiering Wednesday, Oct. 23 at 10 p.m. on NBC.

Born in Stamford, Szymanski is known for independent films including “Creedmoria” and “The Farthest Apple From the Tree.” He graduated from Brien McMahon High School in 2014 and served as the Senior Class President, studying BFA Acting for Film, Television, Voice-overs and Commercials at Pace University in New York City.

Szymanski was elected Executive President of the Student Government Association at Pace University, the highest office a student can hold. He is also credited for helping to add two new Student Senate seats for the Performing Arts School, adding theater spaces for students and creating round tables between business leaders and student creators.

Szymanski says that he is “proud to come from Norwalk and hopes to open more doors for students in the arts, especially within his childhood community.”  

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"Daily Voice" featured Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems Professor Darren Hayes in "Quest Diagnostics Says Nearly 12M May Have Had Financial, Personal Info Exposed In Data Breach"

06/04/2019

"Daily Voice" featured Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems Professor Darren Hayes in "Quest Diagnostics Says Nearly 12M May Have Had Financial, Personal Info Exposed In Data Breach"

... Darren Hayes, Assistant Professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, said the announcement by Quest comes as no surprise "as healthcare records command higher prices on the black market than most types of personal identifiable information."

"The breath of information available from healthcare companies is far greater than most breaches," Hayes said. "In the case of Quest Diagnostics, we can see that personal financial data and medical records appear to have been compromised."

Hayes said Quest is just one of many healthcare companies to have been targeted in recent attacks, including Anthem (80 million impacted), Premera (11 million impacted) and TRICARE (4.9 million impacted).

"The mandated move to Electronic Health Records (EHR) and the rapid growth of cloud services means that more healthcare data is available electronically and from more sources than ever before," Hayes said. "The idea that such invasive data has been compromised in the Quest Diagnostics breach is extremely concerning and creates the potential for all kinds of fraud.

"Those impacted should consider adding a fraud alert to the credit reporting agencies and a credit freeze will provide additional protection to consumers.” 

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"Daily Voice" featured Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in "Pace University Students Help Elmsford Fourth-Graders Learn STEM Skills"

05/10/2019

"Daily Voice" featured Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in "Pace University Students Help Elmsford Fourth-Graders Learn STEM Skills"

Students of Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems helped a class of fourth-graders learn various STEM skills during a five-week program at Alice E. Grady School in Elmsford.

The fourth-graders utilized fun color combinations to learn basic computer coding skills, and on Monday, May 6, the last day of the program, students gave a drone and robotics demonstration called the “City Within a City” showcase to staff members including the Elmsford Superintendent of Schools Marc P. Baiocco, Ed.D., Alice E. Grady Principal Douglas Doller, Elmsford Mayor Robert Williams, and Board of Education members James Henson, President, Yvette Eannazzo, Vice President, Candice Wood, Dennis Rambaran and Marla Peers.

The program included a total of 32 students from Seidenberg School; eight students per class and 16 in an inclusion class. Students taught various coding skills as part of their 13-week university class.

This program was part of the Service Learning Initiative at Pace University, which is primarily focused on nurturing non-traditional and first-generation students for success.

“The program was a win-win. Alice E. Grady students were exposed to skills that we hope will stimulate their interest in future STEM careers, and Seidenberg students built their confidence and felt the satisfaction of giving back to their community,” said Pauline Mosley, D.P.S., a computer science professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School. “I told them, ‘you have the power to transform little minds by just teaching.’’’

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"Daily Voice Plus" featured Seidenberg Dean Jonathan Hill's piece "Keeping Pace: Cybersecurity horror stories must be taken seriously"

04/19/2019

"Daily Voice Plus" featured Seidenberg Dean Jonathan Hill's piece "Keeping Pace: Cybersecurity horror stories must be taken seriously"

Computer science is a hot field. Our scientific and business communities depend on it.

Every day we read stories about innovation in the mainstream and business press on topics like artificial intelligence, deep learning and machine learning. We read about giant companies coming to set up business in town, bringing with them thousands of tech-related jobs. We read about canceled deals and angry politicians.

The constant flurry of information is exciting, but it can also produce anxiety. As computing technologies advance, so do the opportunities for your business — including the very real opportunities to be left behind by competitors who adopt and adapt faster or better than you.

Even more alarming are the constant cybersecurity horror stories of attacks on businesses of every size, stories that are rapidly multiplying. We hear all about the growing sophistication and relentless nature of the hackers who perpetrate these attacks. And Amazon’s pullout from New York City has had a deflating effect on many people in the industry, whether they agreed with the subsidies or not, because losing 25,000 white-collar jobs is a loss that will be felt from Long Island City to New Rochelle.

Media coverage can fuel the fear of being left behind by new technologies, as well as increase our sense of vulnerability to threats like hackers. When our neighbors are appearing in the news from one day to the next, it’s a very real concern to have.

Articles like the recent ones about the lack of seats available in computer science classes, on foreign powers surpassing the U.S. in powerful technologies like AI and The New York Times piece on how women became so undervalued in a software development industry that they did so much to build are forwarded myriad times by well-intentioned colleagues whenever they run. I receive these with a note that is usually a variation on the question: what are you going to do about it?

So what I am going to do about it is this: my colleagues and I will continue to educate and train the technology workforce of 2025 and the executive tech workforce of 2040. Along the way, we also educate the founders who will drive the emerging Westchester start-up scene, who will conduct the research at the proposed Westchester Biotech hub and who will take the burgeoning number of technology jobs in this area that have been difficult to fill.

While seats at some of the country’s large public universities may be tough to come by, we have seats in our computer science classes at Pace University. Some of these classes are for career changers or those looking to brush up on their skills in order to keep up with the constantly developing tech environment in which they work.

Many topics like AI, machine learning, cybersecurity, bioinformatics, robotics and data analytics are increasingly foundation knowledge in every industry and are going to be needed for executives, managers and line workers as well. If that sounds far-fetched, New York Presbyterian Hospital recently created an introductory course on artificial intelligence for its employees. It ran out of spaces.

Building awareness among the workforce is key to maintaining Westchester’s reputation as a center for science-driven business. The Regenerons of our area and the next generation of life science businesses that will move and be founded here will need a technologically sophisticated workforce.

To attract and keep these new businesses here, we need to fill our computer science (and other STEM disciplines) classrooms with smart, ambitious people who will not only be aware, but will want to own these technology processes and take them to the next level. White Plains Hospital is developing a new innovation and accelerator initiative to develop the technologies they need to best serve their patients — while identifying and developing entrepreneurial talent in the health care technology space.

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"Daily Voice" featured the Elisabeth Haub School of Law (Pace Law) in "Pace University Ranks No. 1 In Environmental Law By US News & World Report"

03/15/2019

"Daily Voice" featured the Elisabeth Haub School of Law (Pace Law) in "Pace University Ranks No. 1 In Environmental Law By US News & World Report"

  US News & World Report has recognized Pace University’s environmental law program as the best in the nation.

The program, called the Elisabeth Haub School of Law (Pace Law), was first developed 40 years ago and has since become a “signature program” at the school. The program has recruited some top-rated faculty who are recognized scholars within the fields of climate change law, international human rights law and natural resources and food systems law.

  “At Pace University, we prepare students to change the world,” said Pace President Marvin Krislov. “Our environmental law program, which trains attorneys for this critically important field, has long done world-recognized work. It is fitting that it’s now the top-ranked program in the country. Congratulations to our Law School’s faculty, staff, and students on this much-deserved recognition, and thanks to the Haub family for their commitment to the environment and to the Law School.”

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