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Teller Report featured Pace's 13-year-old student in "German studies at Pace at the age of 13"

04/21/2021

Teller Report featured Pace's 13-year-old student in "German studies at Pace at the age of 13"

Even in elementary school, Shahab Gharib was always done with all tasks in front of his classmates.

“That's why I always read my way through all the libraries,” says the 13-year-old who was born in Bruchsal, Baden-Württemberg and moved to Florida with his parents as a toddler.

"Every day I came home and said:" Today I read three books, today I read four books. "" He was through all of the "Harry Potter" volumes in first grade.

"When he said he wanted to read my books, I said:" You can't do that, you are still much too young, that is a secret language, "says Shahab's father Bardia.

“Of course he then taught himself to read.

I showed him a few tricks on how to recognize letters, and a few weeks later he pulled the first books off the shelf.

He was maybe three then.

But I neither trained nor forced, nor would I have written it down as special, because if I were a footballer and if I had started playing with him early, he might have juggled the ball, so it was normal for me. "

It wasn't until Gharib landed in the top thousandth in a nationwide test for children twice his age in fourth grade that the father realized: "That was the breakthrough for me, I thought something was wrong with the guy," says he. "We were really a little proud of that." Gharib switched to a gifted school in Florida, completed all his subjects with top marks, took additional online courses and finally graduated from high school last year - at just twelve years old. An age when other kids haven't even started high school.

He then applied to numerous universities and since this spring, Gharib, who turned 13 in February, has now been studying at New York's renowned Pace University - as one of the youngest students in the history of the educational institution, albeit not the youngest, as the university reports .

Read the full Teller Report article.

 

 

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Hearst Connecticut featured Dyson Professor Maria Luskay and her class’s film project in "Westport, Weston bees offer lesson in resiliency in documentary"

04/21/2021

Hearst Connecticut featured Dyson Professor Maria Luskay and her class’s film project in "Westport, Weston bees offer lesson in resiliency in documentary"

The world watched as a fire raged through the Notre Dame cathedral in Paris in April 2019, leaving a wake of destruction. As the smoke cleared, people soon learned that the rooftop beehives survived, offering some hope amid a tragedy.

It captivated the interest of Maria Luskay, a professor of media, communications and digital arts at nearby Pace University, so much so that she decided it would be the subject of her annual documentary program.

But when the pandemic hit last March, the class had to shift, instead getting a first-hand lesson in resiliency from the bees in their own backyards, visiting apiaries in Connecticut, New York, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Among them were hives in Westport and Weston.

“They took what could have been a disaster and these students made honey,” Luskay said.

After months of work — going beyond the semester and even past graduation for some — adapting to collaborating and editing in a pandemic, their final product, “Bee Aware” is set to premiere at www.pace.edu/beeaware at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, with a question and answer session to follow on Zoom at 8 p.m.

The 20 undergraduate and graduate students in the class spent more than two months researching urban beekeeping, setting up interviews, securing permits and booking flights for Paris. Their bags were packed and they were ready to go, when Italy started to lock down due to COVID and it soon became apparent they would need a new approach.

Read the full Hearst Connecticut article.

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Police 1 featured Dyson Professor Darrin Porcher's op-ed "Why agencies should take advantage of Guardian's National Applicant Information Center"

04/20/2021

Police 1 featured Dyson Professor Darrin Porcher's op-ed "Why agencies should take advantage of Guardian's National Applicant Information Center"

An op-ed written by Dr. Darrin Porcher. Dr. Darrin Porcher retired from the New York City Police Department as a lieutenant after 20 years of service. He is a criminal justice expert witness and consultant. He earned his doctoral degree from Fordham University, holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Organizational Management from St. Joseph's College and a Masters of Public Administration from Marist College. He also served as an officer in the United States Army Reserve. Dr. Porcher also teaches criminal justice at Pace University and frequently appears on national television as an expert contributor to criminal justice discussions on Fox, CourtTV and other media outlets.

Imagine you're a background investigator and you're reviewing the personal history questionnaire (PHQ) of a new applicant. Little do you know, this same applicant submitted their information to an agency right next door a month ago. And, they were not eligible for hire due to disqualifying information contained in their PHQ. 

Now imagine that the applicant removed the disqualifying information prior to submitting their PHQ to you. How would you know? 

In most instances, you wouldn't, but it doesn't have to be this way anymore.

Protecting the integrity of law enforcement

Historically, in most instances, the only way background investigators knew that an applicant had applied at another agency was if the applicant disclosed it to them. Although such disclosure is required by many agencies, it's dependent on the honor and integrity of the applicant to disclose it. If an applicant is willing to falsify information on their PHQ to get hired, then are they really likely to be honest about whether they've applied elsewhere?  

It has been this way for decades, and it is part of the reason that bad apples find their way into law enforcement, despite the diligence of the best investigators in the profession. Living with the risk that one of these applicants will eventually do something that harms the community they serve reflects poorly on the profession and is unacceptable. 

Read the full Police 1 article.

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New Jersey Stage featured Dyson professor of theatre Catalina Florina Florescu in "Jersey City Theater Center's 2021 New Play Festival To Take Place Online"

04/19/2021

New Jersey Stage featured Dyson professor of theatre Catalina Florina Florescu in "Jersey City Theater Center's 2021 New Play Festival To Take Place Online"

The festival within a festival is curated by Catalina Florina Florescu, a professor of theatre at Pace University in New York, who is a resident theater curator of the Jersey City Theater Center (JCTC).  Says Florescu, who holds a Ph.D. in Medical Humanities, “Entering our second year into a devastating pandemic, these artists tell engaging stories that help us recognize our own struggles, as well as tap into countless and often personal resources for healing.”

Read the full New Jersey Stage article.

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News12 featured Pace alumn Maral Javadifar and Pace basketball coach Carrie Seymour in "Former Pace University woman's basketball player looks to make history at Super Bowl"

02/04/2021

News12 featured Pace alumn Maral Javadifar and Pace basketball coach Carrie Seymour in "Former Pace University woman's basketball player looks to make history at Super Bowl"

For just the second time in history, the Super Bowl sidelines will feature a female coach and this year, there are ties to Westchester County.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers assistant strength and conditioning coach Maral Javadifar has always been inspired by those who have broken barriers, namely her mother, who fled war-torn Iran in the 1980s. “It's quite the journey for her to not be able to attend sporting events or have as many opportunities. For her and my father, they really did whatever they could to afford me the opportunities to embrace each of those journeys," says Javadifar.

Before her life in football, Javadifar was a basketball player at Pace University. Despite tearing her ACL in her senior year of high school, she played at Pace - where she discovered her true passion: physical therapy. “When Maral first came in, she was an accounting major. It didn't take her long to change to biology. She really enjoyed physical therapy, she really respected physical therapists,” says Pace women's basketball head coach Carrie Seymour.

After completing her biology degree, she got her doctorate in physical therapy. “Within that whole process, I was shadowing strength coaches and training to separate myself from others,” says Javadifar.

Eventually it all paid off, and now she's coaching for a Super Bowl contender. And while she has been fortunate enough to be a pioneer for women in her industry, her hope is that this soon becomes the norm. "I do look forward to the day that it's no longer newsworthy. And I hope we get to a point where all people are afforded equal opportunities to work in professional sports."

If the Bucs win on Sunday, Javadifar would be the first woman coach to help a team hoist the Lombardi trophy, adding to her already impressive resume.

Read the News12 article and watch the interview.

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