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News12 featured Pace alumn Maral Javadifar and Pace basketball coach Carrie Seymour in "Former Pace University woman's basketball player looks to make history at Super Bowl"

02/04/2021

News12 featured Pace alumn Maral Javadifar and Pace basketball coach Carrie Seymour in "Former Pace University woman's basketball player looks to make history at Super Bowl"

For just the second time in history, the Super Bowl sidelines will feature a female coach and this year, there are ties to Westchester County.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers assistant strength and conditioning coach Maral Javadifar has always been inspired by those who have broken barriers, namely her mother, who fled war-torn Iran in the 1980s. “It's quite the journey for her to not be able to attend sporting events or have as many opportunities. For her and my father, they really did whatever they could to afford me the opportunities to embrace each of those journeys," says Javadifar.

Before her life in football, Javadifar was a basketball player at Pace University. Despite tearing her ACL in her senior year of high school, she played at Pace - where she discovered her true passion: physical therapy. “When Maral first came in, she was an accounting major. It didn't take her long to change to biology. She really enjoyed physical therapy, she really respected physical therapists,” says Pace women's basketball head coach Carrie Seymour.

After completing her biology degree, she got her doctorate in physical therapy. “Within that whole process, I was shadowing strength coaches and training to separate myself from others,” says Javadifar.

Eventually it all paid off, and now she's coaching for a Super Bowl contender. And while she has been fortunate enough to be a pioneer for women in her industry, her hope is that this soon becomes the norm. "I do look forward to the day that it's no longer newsworthy. And I hope we get to a point where all people are afforded equal opportunities to work in professional sports."

If the Bucs win on Sunday, Javadifar would be the first woman coach to help a team hoist the Lombardi trophy, adding to her already impressive resume.

Read the News12 article and watch the interview.

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Newsweek featured Dyson Professor Aditi Paul’s research in "Why Dating Apps Are No Way to Find True Love"

02/03/2021

Newsweek featured Dyson Professor Aditi Paul’s research in "Why Dating Apps Are No Way to Find True Love"

Breakup rates are higher too. Aditi Paul, a communications professor at Pace University in New York, analyzed the most comprehensive independent dataset on online and offline dating—Stanford University's "How Couples Meet and Stay Together" survey. In one part of her study, Paul found that relationships involving people who first met in real life lasted four times longer than those of couples who first met online.

Why is it harder to find true love on the apps? Human beings evolved as social animals. We bond through shared experience. It's why jokes always seem funnier with friends than alone. Those shared experiences become part of us—the stories we love to tell and retell to those closest. They become the foundations for deeper emotional connections.

Read the full Newsweek article.

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Milwaukee Independent featured Dyson Professor Adam Klein's piece "The need to protect history: Even with overwhelming proof social media promotes Holocaust denial"

01/27/2021

Milwaukee Independent featured Dyson Professor Adam Klein's piece "The need to protect history: Even with overwhelming proof social media promotes Holocaust denial"

That startling statistic was cited as one of the main reasons that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg decided in October to finally ban Holocaust denial across the social network. Denying the Holocaust ever happened is an enduring form of anti-Semitic propaganda that attempts to deny or minimize the atrocities committed by the Nazis against the Jews during World War II.

Following Facebook’s lead, Twitter announced it, too, would remove any posts that denied the history of the Holocaust, though CEO Jack Dorsey appeared to contradict that policy at a Senate hearing weeks later.

Holocaust deniers have continued to emerge in social media, and perhaps predictably, many have migrated to less restrictive sites like Parler, where hashtags like #HolocaustNeverHappened and #HolocaustIsALie are widespread. “If you want Holocaust denial, hey, Parler is going to be great for you,” Bill Gates recently said of the social network.

While some tech companies address the rise in Holocaust revisionism, and others leave the door open, social networks have played an unwitting role in helping to distort the memory of these horrific events. But as a scholar who studies online extremism, I believe that same community could do more to protect Holocaust remembrance by highlighting the digitized accounts of those who lived through it.

Read the full Milwaukee Independent article.

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Hearst Connecticut Newspapers featured Dyson Professor Daniel Bender's piece "Opinion: Why social media bans restore free speech"

01/25/2021

Hearst Connecticut Newspapers featured Dyson Professor Daniel Bender's piece "Opinion: Why social media bans restore free speech"

Recent fallout over the Capitol insurrection has radiated outward, from finding the bad actors to wondering about the role of social media. Is social media’s consumer orientation — sign up, post what you are thinking — an unintended medium for sedition?

If a post is deemed dangerous to the public good, the thinking goes, then it should be removed. Obscenities and hateful rants present an easy decision to remove the post, perhaps ban the poster. But if a social media becomes the platform for wily political opportunists to create mayhem? Is the claim that an election has been stolen by widespread miscounting and hence fraud an act of free speech, allowing the reader to decide for herself? Or is free speech too crude a term, unresponsive to gradations of intention that range from informed and rational to manipulative and inflammatory?

As the history of political incitement shows, a leader who is good at identifying an “enemy of the people” can use speeches — or tweets — to excite a group of fanatic followers who will lash out, full of high-minded reasons, at the supposed enemies. As immigrant Arnold Schwarzenegger recently explained, the hate-filled attack on Jewish businesses known as Kristallnacht was incited by Hitler’s desire to create fanatic loyalists. The armed bands needed an evil enemy — the Jewish community that had long contributed to the German economy. Once bonded in fanatic loyalty to their lying leader, these patriots would ensure a lifetime dictatorship for their god-like leader.

Read the full Hearst Connecticut Newspapers article.

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Cheddar featured Dyson Professor Darrin Porcher in "Unprecedented 25K National Guard Troops Guard Biden Inauguration"

01/22/2021

Cheddar featured Dyson Professor Darrin Porcher in "Unprecedented 25K National Guard Troops Guard Biden Inauguration"

We speak to former NYPD Lieutenant Darrin Porcher about the overwhelming security presence on Capitol Hill protecting the newly sworn-in President and Vice President. Darrin also draws on his experience as a professor of criminal justice at Pace University to explain what the future of the justice system may look like under a Biden administration.  

Watch the Cheddar news clip.

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