main navigation
my pace

Education Dive | PACE UNIVERSITY

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Education Dive" featured President Marvin Krislov's piece "3 ways one campus is reaching underrepresented students"

10/15/2019

"Education Dive" featured President Marvin Krislov's piece "3 ways one campus is reaching underrepresented students"

When I decided to come to Pace University two years ago, I came because of the students. I'd visited the campuses, walked the halls, and met the hard-working, ambitious doers and strivers who make up — and who have always made up — Pace's student body.

For more than a century, Pace has provided a quality education and career path to those who are driven and willing to work hard. We've educated immigrants and their children, first-generation students, adult learners, people from every imaginable cultural, ethnic and socioeconomic background.

And over that time, two things have remained constant: 

     *Our students don't take educational opportunities for granted.

     *Our students know that a college education can transform their lives — and, by extension, their families and even their communities.

That's why we work so hard to attract, enroll and retain a diverse group of students, many of whom lack the resources or support to help them get to college.

But we get them here: Each year, about half of our incoming class is from underrepresented groups. Nearly half are first-generation. And over a third are Pell-eligible.

We are meeting students as they are and where they are and taking them to where they want to be. This commitment contributes to Pace's position as the top four-year, private nonprofit college in the country for upward economic mobility, according to [a list compiled by The Chronicle of Higher Education based on data from] the Opportunity Insights research project at Harvard University.

Our strategy, rooted in Pace's mission, has three main pillars.

Removing barriers

The college application and enrollment process are littered with hurdles. Students who lack financial resources or access to guidance — even the best, hardest-working ones — can struggle to navigate and clear all of them.

At Pace, we don't look at a student or family's income when we make our admissions decisions. We're not always able to meet full need, but we work hard to help admitted students find a way to make it work. Our financial literacy counselors stay involved with students and families from application through enrollment, so they understand the four-year cost of college, find resources to help them pay for it and emerge as debt-free as possible. We have a growing team of bilingual counselors to ease communication with families.

Enrolled students are then put on the Pace Path, our signature education model integrating curricula with practical experiences like internships and research. It's all organized in a personalized plan to keep students on track to graduate in four years, fully prepared for a great first job and a great career.

Building a pipeline

Students from families or communities that haven't traditionally sent students to college are at a profound disadvantage in the application process because they have few seasoned guides to its complexities. We try to build bridges to help such students find their way to Pace.

Our admissions staff goes on more than 800 high school visits each year, making a concerted effort to engage schools in underrepresented communities. When we find schools that regularly produce Pace students, we deepen those relationships to broaden and increase the pool of applicants, expanding opportunity among demographics that need it most. We also run workshops on financial aid and admissions in our lower Manhattan community, helping students and families understand the process.

We work with college access groups, programs that provide coaching and resources to students who need them. One example of these is Latino U College Access, founded by Pace alumna Shirley Acevedo Buontempo, who developed the plan when she returned to Pace for her master's of public administration. She realized that low-income, first-generation Latino students lacked advantages her daughter had as the child of two successful college graduates. We're proud to work with Shirley's program and others like it.

Expanding the pool

Colleges and universities need to welcome people different from those who fit a traditional "college student" mold.

We're building dual-admission programs with area community colleges, so students have a path toward a bachelor's degree. Community college students frequently use up too much Pell Grant eligibility before getting to a four-year college. With dual admission, students plan an academic program long before arriving at Pace. By earning the right credits in community college, they're positioned to get that bachelor's degree on time and to use aid efficiently.

Student veterans are a priority at Pace. We have two Veteran Services officers — who are veterans themselves — dedicated to supporting our student veterans from application through their experiences as enrolled students. In our Military Mondays program, we're prepared during application periods to admit veterans on the spot, so long as their materials are in order. We also help student veterans secure financial support, including offering unlimited Yellow Ribbon benefits to Iraq and Afghanistan vets. 

We don't forget the career outcomes veterans seek. Our Veterans Career Fair last spring attracted 35 employers — all the room could hold, with a long waitlist for spots — and served students from Pace and area colleges.

Finally, we're overhauling our online offerings. Many students, particularly graduate students, have career and family commitments, so they need classes and programs that work on their schedules. We've offered online education for many years, but we're redoubling our efforts, with 17 programs in development to launch or re-launch over the next several semesters.

At Pace, we're determined to give a great education to everyone who wants it, no matter who they are — or where they are. It's hard work, but it's worth it, for our students, for Pace and for society.

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Education Dive" featured Pace University President Marvin Krislov in "Leader sees cross-generational value in a nationwide education corps"

10/15/2018

"Education Dive" featured Pace University President Marvin Krislov in "Leader sees cross-generational value in a nationwide education corps"

Dive Brief:

*An estimated 10,000 baby boomers retire every day, creating a vast pool of highly skilled professionals with extra time on their hands, Pace University President Marvin Krislov writes in a column for Forbes.

*Research shows that one-on-one and small group interventions can provide at-risk youth with the assistance and motivation they need to stay in school.

*Creating an "education corps" comprised of retiring baby boomers willing to volunteer as tutors and mentors in high-poverty schools could go a long way toward helping at-risk youth finish high school and pursue a college a degree, Krislov writes.

Dive Insight:

A combination of factors including low salaries, high student loans and substandard teaching conditions have contributed to a critical teacher shortage throughout the U.S., especially in math, science, special education and English as a second language.

The problem is particularly acute in low-income, high-minority schools where the teacher attrition rate far exceeds the national average of 8%. To fill the void, education leaders have come up with myriad ways of enticing new faces, including baby boomers, into the classroom to teach full-time or help fill in the gaps for at-risk youth.

AARP’s Experience Corps, for example, is made up of nearly 2,000 volunteers who assist elementary school students with literacy skills in more than 20 cities around the country. The program has been in place since the mid ‘90s, and researchers have found that in addition to providing a significant boost to student achievement, it contributes to the mental and physical well-being of volunteers.

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Education Dive" featured a video of President Marvin Krislov speaking about his first year at the helm of Pace University in "Video: Presidents reflect on proudest moments from 2018 commencements"

06/04/2018

"Education Dive" featured a video of President Marvin Krislov speaking about his first year at the helm of Pace University in "Video: Presidents reflect on proudest moments from 2018 commencements"

Commencement represents the culmination of a journey for students, but few realize it represents the same for the administrators who walked with them. For first-time presidents, the magnitude of the responsibilities they carry to ensure the success of future generations may hit them as they look out on the sea of faces. For others, new and seasoned, recognizing the individual triumphs of the students who walk across the stage, knowing their stories and what they had to overcome to get to that moment is validation of the importance of their work — it's easy to get bogged down in meetings and administrative tasks, but graduation exercises are the most glaring reminder that the job is really about the students and their success. 

We asked four university presidents to reflect on their commencement exercises and share the moments that most stuck out to them. Here's what they had to say:

Trinity University President Patricia McGuire excitedly reflected on the accomplishments of the college's first class of graduating Deferred Action for Child Arrivals.

Marvin Krislov and Pareena Lawrence just finished their first year at the helm of Pace University and Hollins University, respectively. Krisolov said he was particularly moved by the stories of individual students at his institution as well.

Click here to watch the video and read the article.