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The Examiner | PACE UNIVERSITY

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The Examiner featured the new Student Veterans Center on the Pleasantville campus in "Pace Opens Student Veterans Center"

09/24/2020

The Examiner featured the new Student Veterans Center on the Pleasantville campus in "Pace Opens Student Veterans Center"

President Marvin Krislov joined New York State Senator Peter Harckham, student veterans and campus leaders on Monday for a grand opening of Pace University’s Student Veterans Center on its Pleasantville campus. The new center, which was made possible with the help of a $200,000 grant secured by Senator Harckham, will serve as a one-stop resource center for student veterans at Pace, which has hundreds of student veterans and dependents across its campuses, including 60 in Westchester. The new SVC is centrally located on campus inside the Kessel Student Center.

Read the full Examiner article. (E-Edition, Page 19)

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The Examiner featured about 200 Pace University student-athletes in "Pace Athletes March for Racial Justice and Remember DJ Henry"

08/31/2020

The Examiner featured about 200 Pace University student-athletes in "Pace Athletes March for Racial Justice and Remember DJ Henry"

About 200 Pace University student-athletes marched from the Pleasantville campus to the Thornwood Town Center Sunday afternoon, calling for racial justice and an end to police brutality against people of color.

Holding signs and chanting slogans, the diverse group of athletes ended the walk with a rally where Danroy (DJ) Henry, a Black 20-year-old Pace student and a member of the school’s football team, was shot and killed by a Pleasantville police officer nearly 10 years ago.

Carlton Aiken, quarterback for the Pace University football team, said the captains of all of the school’s sports teams collectively agreed not to practice last Thursday, the day after six NBA teams and several Major League Baseball teams decided against playing following the shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisc.

“We sat out of practice, so we didn’t want to sit by and do nothing, we wanted to be seen and heard and what better way to be seen and heard than walking to where a tragic event had happened to someone on our campus and one of our fellow athletes,” Aiken said.

Several students said that since the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May and last week’s incident involving Blake, an increasing number of Pace students have become increasingly aware of what happened to Henry in the early morning hours of Oct. 17, 2010.

“I know that some people know the basics of the story but they don’t know the details and they don’t know all the ins and outs,” said Blair Wynn, a 2015 Pace graduate and a current assistant football coach. “A lot of stuff is not discussed as it should be, as it needs to be, if you ask me.”

Henry was behind the wheel of a car parked in the fire lane next to the curb with two friends, out celebrating after a game with teammates. Meanwhile, a fight had broken out outside the old Finnegan’s Bar & Grill in the Town Center. A Mount Pleasant police officer asked that Henry move his car, and when he did Pleasantville Police Officer Aaron Hess walked in front of the vehicle and shot through the windshield. Hess was then propelled onto the hood of the car. Henry died a short while later.

A grand jury failed to indict Hess several months later. Henry’s parents filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the officer and the Village of Pleasantville, settling in 2016 for about $6 million.

Some of the marchers also called for authorities to reopen the case in hopes of investigating and trying Hess for Henry’s death. Earlier this summer a change.org petition was launched with a goal of collecting 500,000 signatures. As of Sunday, more than 352,000 names are on the petition.

Read the full Examiner article.

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The Examiner featured Pace University in “Inside the Mind of a Teen: What Colleges Must Do in the Wake of the Lawrence Ray Case”

02/19/2020

The Examiner featured Pace University in “Inside the Mind of a Teen: What Colleges Must Do in the Wake of the Lawrence Ray Case”

First, while it’s unrealistic for college administrators to know everything that happens on their campuses at all times, it’s reasonable to expect them to enact appropriate housing policies and strictly adhere to them. According to a recently published article by Lohud, “students are limited to no more than three consecutive nights” at Iona College in nearby New Rochelle. Further, at Pace University in Pleasantville, “student spaces are inspected throughout the semester to ensure that they aren’t in violation of guest policies.” The adoption of similar regulations across all college campuses may help to achieve a balance between hospitality and student safety.

Read the full Examiner article.

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"The Examiner" featured Seidenberg's Camp CryptoBot in "Pace's Cybersecurity Camp Inspires Next Generation"

08/14/2019

"The Examiner" featured Seidenberg's Camp CryptoBot in "Pace's Cybersecurity Camp Inspires Next Generation"

Utilizing underwater robots, aerial drones and cutting-edge coding techniques, 50 high school students from throughout the region have gained hands-on cybersecurity experience as part of Pace University’s Camp CryptoBot.

Inspired by a mission to motivate younger students to pursue cybersecurity – especially women and those from underserved areas – the camp is supported by the National Security Agency (NSA) and the National Science Foundation as part of the national GenCyber program. Earlier in July, Pace University also hosted a two-week cybersecurity workshop for teachers to help facilitate the integration of cybersecurity concepts into lessons and after-school activities.

“Pace University’s commitment to cybersecurity education benefits the whole nation. Everything we do today has a cybersecurity component to it,” said NSA National Cryptologic School Commandant Diane M. Janosek. “GenCyber gives students the opportunity to learn about the role cybersecurity plays in their daily lives and encourages them to consider working in this field.”

“By 2020, it’s estimated that up to 2 million unfilled cybersecurity positions will exist in the United States. From national security to personal privacy, this shortage poses a critical threat to our society – but also an opportunity for students,” said Professor Pauline Mosley, who spearheaded the camp on behalf of Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. “Pace University is committed to closing that gap by inspiring younger students to pursue cybersecurity and by equipping teachers with the resources they need to incorporate these lessons.” 

In addition to hands-on labs, Camp CryptoBot also taught students to understand safe online behavior and how ethics applies to cybersecurity. The five-day camp was free for all accepted students, including free breakfast and lunch.

Fourteen-year-old Nickole Leite, who attends Yonkers Middle/High School, said that although things like cipher codes are complicated at first, once you get to know them each becomes simplified and very secretive – something she’s been drawn to since she was a young child.

“When I was little I used to read a lot of mystery books, so learning about different kinds of codes before decrypting and encrypting them is like something out of a movie,” Leite said. “To know it’s real life and I know how to do this is amazing!”

Sponsored by the National Security Agency and the National Science Foundation, GenCyber offers summer cybersecurity camps free-of-cost to students and teachers in grades K-12.  Since 2014, more than 12,000 students and 3,000 teachers have attended GenCyber camps. In 2019, 122 GenCyber camps will be held at 76 institutions across 38 states, D.C. and Puerto Rico, reaching more than 3,000 students and 800 teachers.

Read the full article.

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"The Examiner News" featured Lisdy Contreras Giron, Jordan DiPaolo and James Hickey in "Trio of Pace Grads Overcome Adversity to Earn Their Degrees"

05/28/2019

"The Examiner News" featured Lisdy Contreras Giron, Jordan DiPaolo and James Hickey in "Trio of Pace Grads Overcome Adversity to Earn Their Degrees"

Walking across the stage at college commencement ceremonies is a significant milestone for anyone.

For three new Pace graduates, Lisdy Contreras Giron, Jordan DiPaolo and James Hickey, their journey to receive their degrees on Monday could have easily been derailed by factors outside their control

Giron, a Fox Lane High School graduate, came to the United States with her parents from Guatemala when she was five years old and is a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipient. She graduated with a criminal justice degree and plans to work the upcoming year a paralegal at a law office before going on to law school in a year.

DiPaolo, from a small Texas town, had no money for higher education and needed to first join and serve in the military to go to college. After her service and giving birth to her now four-year-old son, the health science major will be working at Kendal on Hudson in Sleepy Hollow.

By the opening weeks of Hickey’s senior year at Lakeland High School, the Mohegan Lake native had lost both of his parents and lived with different friends and families before earning his diploma. Having held a job since he was 10, Hickey worked in sales out of high school, helping to support himself.

Read the full article.

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"The Examiner" featured Pace's panel discussion about college admissions in "Pace Panel Discusses Combating a Broke College Admissions System"

05/02/2019

"The Examiner" featured Pace's panel discussion about college admissions in "Pace Panel Discusses Combating a Broke College Admissions System"

The breadth and depth of the recent college admissions scandal took some Americans by surprise.

For Shirley Acevedo Buontempo, it helped reinforce why seven years ago she founded Latino U, a nonprofit organization that works to increase college enrollment and graduation rates for first-generation Latino students who are high achieving but come from lower-income households.

“As an organization, our focus was to help students through this complex process and to help students find the resources that more affluent families or second-generation families have access to,” Buontempo said.

Last Thursday at Pace University, Buontempo was part of a 10- member panel of educators, students and admissions officers that discussed the problems and inequities of the current system and what can be done to combat the problems.

Pace President Marvin Krislov said even before the scandal broke, roughly 40 percent of the country didn’t think the college admissions process was fair, one study concluded. It’s not only about access to money and having a strong GPA and test scores, but the system favors students and families who knew which buttons to push for their benefit, he said.

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