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Examiner News featured Pace University in "Pace to Resume Classes Aug. 24 Using in-Person and Remote Learning"

06/24/2020

Examiner News featured Pace University in "Pace to Resume Classes Aug. 24 Using in-Person and Remote Learning"

Pace University announced Tuesday it will begin the 2020-21 academic year on Aug. 24 with a combination of in-person, online and hybrid learning and complete classes in time for the Thanksgiving break.

A joint letter from President Marvin Krislov, Vanya Quiñones, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, and Brian Anderson, director of emergency management and environmental health and safety, outlined a list of regulations and safety protocols for students, faculty and staff to follow. The schedule will affect all three of the university’s campuses – Pleasantville, New York City and the Elisabeth Haub School of Law in White Plains.

“We are determined to provide our students with the high-quality educational experience they expect while protecting health and safety for everyone in our community, including students, faculty, and staff,” the letter stated.

Pace also announced that a coronavirus coordination officer will be appointed to serve as a point of contact for all students, faculty and staff to manage testing, tracing and response efforts. The officer will also coordinate with public health officials.

All final exams will be administered remotely from Nov. 30 through Dec. 5.

The letter stated that ending the semester on campus by Thanksgiving will comply with public health guidance. It is to avoid dispersing students, faculty and staff across the country before they return to the campus, which could potentially contribute to spreading the virus. The letter did not address how Pace will handle the spring semester.

According to the plan, critical operations staff and research personnel will return to campus on June 29 and student-facing staff and those necessary to prepare residence halls for student arrivals will start returning July 6.

Then full faculty and staff will begin to return to campus on Aug. 10. There will be a target of 25 percent overall occupancy on each campus. That target will be achieved with a mix of remote work for some, in-person attendance and staggered scheduling.

Students may begin arriving at the dormitories as early as Aug. 14 with social distancing protocols being followed, the letter stated.

All members of the Pace community should be tested for COVID-19 before they return to campus. There will be ongoing health monitoring of everyone on campus. Those who test positive may not come onto campus and should consult a healthcare provider. That would require 14 days of isolation, and three days without fever or fever-reducing medication, before returning to campus, according to the letter.

There will be random temperature checks conducted and everyone on campus will be required to conduct daily self-monitoring for symptoms, using the CDC questionnaire this summer and via a Pace mobile app beginning in the fall. Anyone reporting symptoms will be referred to healthcare at Pace or their own healthcare provider. Approved visitors to campus, including vendors and contractors, will be expected to follow these procedures.

Various factors will help determine how many students will attend the in-person classes, including the size of the space and the types of classes, said Pace spokesman Jerry McKinstry.

Any student uncomfortable with attending in-person classes may take their courses remotely.

“I think the goal is to offer (classes) in person and remote to whomever is comfortable doing either, and in some cases, that will be simultaneous,” McKinstry said. “In some cases, there will be certain classes that will be only offered remotely.”

There are also protocols for managing, cleaning and disinfecting all spaces at Pace.

The Pace Board of Trustees approved the reopening plan proposed by the COVID-19 Task Force, which studied multiple options for three months searching for a safe return to campus this fall. It includes recommendations from the CDC, the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities and the American College Health Association and will be submitted to New York State.

Read the full Examiner News article.

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The Examiner News featured Enrollment VP Robina Schepp in "Uncertainties Cloud College Process for Students and Families"

05/21/2020

The Examiner News featured Enrollment VP Robina Schepp in "Uncertainties Cloud College Process for Students and Families"

Pace University, for example, moved its decision day to June 15, except for their performing arts students, who had to commit by the usual May 1 deadline, said Vice President of Enrollment Robina Schepp. Most universities extended the timeline, recognizing that students needed more time to make what for many is the biggest decision of their lives, Schepp said.

She said earlier this month that responses from students on committing had been slightly slower than normal but not significantly so. The university also accepted about 14 percent more students this year.

“The challenge is, for us, to really feel like we’re creating the same level of connection with students when we’re not seeing them face to face,” Schepp said.

One encouraging sign, Schepp noted, has been that the virtual visits this spring of would-be Pace students have been much more engaged than in previous years during on-site visits. Without able to see the school community in action for themselves, they are asking many more questions to get a better feel for their decisions.

Read the full The Examiner News article.

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The Examiner News featured College of Health Professions experts Professor Christen Cupples Cooper and Professor Jessica Tosto in "Be Honest, About to Lose Your Mind Amidst Corona? Listen Up to These Pace Experts"

03/30/2020

The Examiner News featured College of Health Professions experts Professor Christen Cupples Cooper and Professor Jessica Tosto in "Be Honest, About to Lose Your Mind Amidst Corona? Listen Up to These Pace Experts"

Staying sane, centered and healthy in the new COVID-19 world, can be a challenge, but experts from Pace University’s College of Health Professions say that channeling anxiety into productive activity can provide solace and sanity.

From cooking with your children to taking time out for mental health moments, Pace University experts this week suggested a variety of techniques to take your minds off the barrage of unsettling news.

“During this time of uncertainty, try to conserve your energy to stay healthy rather than using energy for panic and worry,’’ said Professor Christen Cupples Cooper, EdD, RD, Director of the College of Health Professions Dietetics and Nutrition Program. “It can be difficult, but it’s definitely doable, and even necessary during these challenging times.”

Here are some suggestions from Professor Cooper:

Eat healthfully.  Make comfort foods such as stews, soups, and chili. Chili is a perfect dish for using leftover veggies and beans.  Broccoli and tomatoes with two onions, frozen corn, frozen lima beans, canned black beans and chickpeas and an extra-large can of salsa make the best chili ever! Spices are healthy. Add cilantro, chili powder, curry powder, cumin and black pepper. Experiment with your dishes. Remember, focus on healthful ingredients. This chili is loaded with nutrients that contain disease-fighting properties, has an interesting kick, and it’s filling.

Eat your fresh foods first. No one knows how long we’ll have limited access to ingredients, so eat what is in your fridge first and go to your canned and frozen goods next. This way, you maximize taste and minimize waste.

Freeze Fruits that are past their prime for smoothies. If you have fresh fruits that are past their prime (eg black bananas) put them in the freezer to make smoothies or banana bread.  Bruised or too soft apples are great for making applesauce or apple muffins.  Buying frozen fruits like berries or mangos are also great for making smoothies.

Make a weekly meal plan.  This will help you utilize your ingredients most efficiently and take the guess work out of what you will be eating each day or for each meal. It can also help you to use leftovers. (Leftover grilled chicken is great for making chicken salad or stir fry the next day.)

Bring kids into the fold. If your house is like mine, the kids are glum and bored. It’s a good time to show them how to cook! It’s a skill that they will certainly need, and it gives you an extra set of hands for chopping, mixing, and tasting. Depending on where they are with their cooking skills, start relatively small with things like pasta and veggies and progress to meat and fish.

Have a cook-off. Another neat trick to get kids involved is getting them to rate which dish or what food combination they like most. Having a cook off is another great activity. Lay out ingredients and have each child cook their own version of the same dish and then compare and contrast.

So many of us are working from home these days giving us unlimited access to our kitchens. Also, many people have been stocking up on food and snacks so they may have an abundance of foods that they wouldn’t typically have in the house, increasing temptation to eat.

Professor Jessica Tosto, MS, RD, CNSC, of Pace University’s College of Health Professions had these suggestions for helping to avoid overeating and maintain a healthy diet.

Set up a workspace that is not in or near your kitchen.  Putting some physical distance between yourself and your snacks can limit those frequent trips to the fridge.

Read the full The Examiner News article.

 

 

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The Examiner News featured President Marvin Krislov in "Pace Calls Off Graduation, Remote Learning to Continue for Rest of Semester"

03/19/2020

The Examiner News featured President Marvin Krislov in "Pace Calls Off Graduation, Remote Learning to Continue for Rest of Semester"

Pace University President Marvin announced Wednesday that there will be no commencement ceremonies for graduating seniors this May and remote learning will extend through the remainder of the semester.

In a communication to the school community, Krislov said that students slated to graduate would earn their degrees and there would be a ceremony to recognize their accomplishments at a future date.

“We do not make these decisions lightly,” Krislov said. “Pace University is a strong, supportive, thriving community. We work together, learn together, and celebrate together. It is our great wish that we can have the full community back on our three campuses, and it is our even greater wish that we could celebrate the many accomplishments of our students at this year’s Commencement.”

The decision to continue remote learning is extended through the end of May. Originally, it was from last week through Mar. 29. The early summer session will also be through remote learning but the university is hoping to return to a normal schedule for classes that begin after June 1, Krislov said.

Students should move out of their dorms and return home if possible. The times that students move out will be coordinated to limit the number of people in the hallways and elevators at one time.

If moving out is a hardship for any student, they can remain in their residence halls through the end of the summer, Krislov said. There will be limited dining service to go.

Furthermore, all in-person events and gatherings have been canceled until further notice.

Read the Examiner News article.

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The Examiner News featured Pace University's Tyrone Cohen Jr. in "Miraculous Shot at the Buzzer Lifts Pace to a Big Victory"

02/10/2020

The Examiner News featured Pace University's Tyrone Cohen Jr. in "Miraculous Shot at the Buzzer Lifts Pace to a Big Victory"

With the final precious seconds ticking off the clock last Wednesday evening, Pace University’s Tyrone Cohen Jr. caught a pass from teammate Bryan Powell along the left sideline, took one dribble across the midcourt line and launched a nearly 40-foot heave toward the basket that was destined to be remembered.

In an instant, Cohen Jr.’s desperation shot just before the buzzer sounded wound up banking off the backboard and right through the rim, sending the entire Setter team spilling on top of him in a wild celebration that would soon be replayed on television sets across the nation — duh-duh-duh, duh-duh-duh — as ESPN SportsCenter’s # 2 play of the day.

The 3-point fling from Cohen capped a Pace comeback from a 15-point second-half deficit and provided the Setters with a 75-72 victory over the visiting Franklin Pierce Ravens at the Goldstein Fitness Center. Trailing by five points with under 90 seconds remaining, Pace closed the contest on an 8-0 run to improve to 14-7 this season and even its record in the Northeast-10 Conference at 6-6.

“I’m just really proud of our guys for staying the course,” said Setters head coach Matt Healing shortly after his team had completed its huge comeback. “That was a tough game against a really good team. They’ve been playing really well, coming off a big win. They beat Adelphi by 30 points last game. So we knew we had our work cut out for us.”

Cohen Jr. had been just two for seven from the field before his game-winning basket. The Setters went scoreless for the first five minutes of the second half, missing all four of their shots and turning the ball over three times, and soon found themselves facing a 53-38 hurdle with 14 minutes remaining. But a 22-7 Pace run that began and ended with buckets from Austin Gilbertson eventually tied the game and set the stage for the heroics to come.

“We could’ve folded, and we didn’t,” said Healing. “It’s easy in a game like that, against a good team, down by 15. We did the things we needed to do to win the game. Obviously people will talk about that last shot for a long time. But we put ourselves in that position with good defense, with great teamwork, staying tough. I just think about big deflections, big jump balls that kept us in the game. Just the small things that added up to get us in position to win the game.”

Read the Examiner News article.

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The Examiner News featured School of Education Professor Dr. Brian Monahan in "Group Makes its Case for Maintaining Bedford’s Five Primary Schools"

01/31/2020

The Examiner News featured School of Education Professor Dr. Brian Monahan in "Group Makes its Case for Maintaining Bedford’s Five Primary Schools"

Besides compromising students’ educational experience, children moved from a closed school could experience emotional turmoil as well, said Dr. Brian Monahan, a professor of education at Pace University in Pleasantville.

“Any time a child’s school is changed and he/she is separated from friends and teachers, it is very emotional for the student and the parents,” Monahan said.

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The Examiner News featured Pace University in "County Kicks Off 2020 Census Drive to Account for All Residents"

01/28/2020

The Examiner News featured Pace University in "County Kicks Off 2020 Census Drive to Account for All Residents"

County Executive George Latimer launched Westchester’s 2020 Census Campaign Monday at Pace University in Pleasantville, urging for the need to reach out and account for every person.

The room at the Kessel Student Center was packed with local, state and federal officials, county commissioners, members of the Census Complete Count Committee, Census advocates, community-based organizations and college students, all working on Westchester’s aggressive outreach program that started last January.

Latimer said the Census outreach effort was unlike any he had ever seen.

“This is the first time in my recollection – having lived through six or seven censuses – that there has been an emphasis and a focus on making sure we have a full and accurate account,” he said. “It’s not just [being done by] county government but by educators at all levels, the healthcare field and law enforcement.”

Latimer stressed two key areas of concern for obtaining an accurate Census count: the federal and state grant process, which is gauged by population data, and representation at the local, state and federal level.

Read the full Examiner News article.

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