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Forbes featured President Marvin Krislov's latest column: "Congratulations, Class Of 2021! You Made It To Graduation, And Now There Are Jobs Waiting For You"

04/22/2021

Forbes featured President Marvin Krislov's latest column: "Congratulations, Class Of 2021! You Made It To Graduation, And Now There Are Jobs Waiting For You"

I’ve got some great news for the bold, brave Class of 2021: There are plenty of jobs out there for new college graduates.

This hasn’t been an easy year for any of us, least of all for this spring’s new crop of college graduates. They spent much of the last year learning remotely, socializing with precautions, missing out on many traditional college experiences. They are a committed, hard-working group; students who knew that the best way to prepare for success post-pandemic was to stay engaged and on-track with their studies. They’re earning their degrees thanks to a remarkable level of dedication and perseverance, and, across the country, many of them aren’t able to have the traditional commencement experience they might have hoped for.

But despite the year we’ve been through, despite the nagging persistence of the pandemic and the painful economic downturn from which we’re still not recovered, all signs suggest that employers are eager to hire this remarkable new group of college grads.

Indeed, employers anticipate hiring 7.2 percent more new college graduates from the Class of 2021 than they did from the Class of 2020, according to a recent report from the National Association of Colleges and Employers. That compares very well to a fall report, when employers predicted hiring slightly fewer college grads.

Read the full Forbes article. 

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Forbes featured Lubin Professor Noushi Rahman in "Rewiring Business Incubators For Success"

04/06/2021

Forbes featured Lubin Professor Noushi Rahman in "Rewiring Business Incubators For Success"

National Business Incubator Association told Business News Daily that 87% of incubator-supported startups survive after five years. That's nearly double the success rate of startups that are on their own. Furthermore, 84% of incubated startups stay in the same community as the incubator, which is an appealing proposition for communities trying to grow their business innovation or drive economic development. However, many incubators struggle to remain competitive and understand how they can attract, retain and graduate the best and brightest startups. Over the past few years, I have been conducting doctoral research with Dr. Noushi Rahman, professor of management at the Pace University Lubin School of Business, on business incubators, and I have compiled the following list on how I believe incubators can rewire their practices for the greatest startup success.  

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Forbes featured President Marvin Krislov's latest column "International Students Are Coming Back To The US—and We Can’t Wait To Welcome Them Back"

03/25/2021

Forbes featured President Marvin Krislov's latest column "International Students Are Coming Back To The US—and We Can’t Wait To Welcome Them Back"

International Students Are Coming Back to the US—and We Can’t Wait to Welcome Them Back

International students are again clamoring to come to the United States.

That’s the word we’re getting from our international partners, and it’s the trend we’re starting to see in application and enrollment numbers. And it’s extraordinarily good news.

Higher education has long been one of this country’s great exports. Our colleges and universities are the envy of the world, and for many years—and especially recently, as the global middle class has grown—aspirational students from all corners of the globe have come to the United States to earn a college degree. They wanted an English-language education, and they especially wanted an American education.

But for the last four years, that American education hasn’t always been easy to obtain. The United States became conspicuously less open to foreigners during the previous administration. Visa restrictions were tightened. International students in some cases reported feeling less welcome in our cities and towns. As a result, the number of international students enrolling in American colleges and universities shrunk. And that prompted the concern that international students wouldn’t want to come to the United States anymore, even when policies changed.

Then came the pandemic, which necessarily prompted major travel restrictions and caused even further enrollment declines. A new report shows that the number of international students studying in the United States fell 18 percent last year, according to student visa records. Even worse, with US consulates worldwide shuttered by the pandemic, the number of visas issued for newly enrolled international students dropped a whopping 72 percent.

The double blow to international enrollment prompted an existential worry. With American colleges and universities less accessible even pre-pandemic, students from around the world had looked to other, more open English-speaking countries, like Australia and Canada. When the pandemic receded, would the next generation of international students look to the United States?

We’re now seeing that the answer is a resounding yes.

Simply put, they want to be here. Our recruitment partners tell us that the change in administration has created tremendous energy and excitement about studying in the United States. The trend is so new that there aren’t yet national numbers. At Pace University, we saw 200 new international students enroll for the Spring 2020 semester, despite continued travel restrictions. Right now, international graduate school applications at Pace are up 11 percent year-over-year—that is, above our pre-lockdown numbers. For undergraduates, inquiries are up 6 percent and applications are up 3 percent against a similar timeframe. We’re hopeful for a close-to-normal Fall 2021, and we anticipate numbers will increase as more and more restrictions are lifted.

They’re recommitting to American colleges and universities because they know we offer what even those other English-speaking countries cannot: the world’s best education, and the world’s most desired job opportunities. International students who come to the United States to study a STEM-related field also have the right to work in this country for up to three years after graduation—with no additional effort on the part of their employer. And there is a huge demand for international graduates in this country, especially in those STEM fields, where they provide much-needed talent that drives growth.

We’re ready to welcome this eager new cohort of international students.

Because as much as international students benefit from learning at American colleges and universities, they also bring unique advantages to our campuses and country, too.

In today’s globalized economy, learning alongside students from around the world helps our American students gain new perspectives and new interpersonal skills, making them better critical thinkers. It helps all of our students learn about other cultures and form more informed opinions. It helps them better understand international issues, foreign affairs, and immigration issues. It provides opportunities for unique cross-cultural experiences, whether celebrating new holidays, sampling new cuisines, or traveling to visit friends in their home countries. And it opens our students to connections that will benefit them throughout their careers.

Rolling out the welcome mat for international students is the ultimate win-win. It’s good for the students, good for our colleges and universities, good for our American students, and good for America’s standing in the world. These students want to be on our campuses. As the world opens back, let’s help them get here.

Read the Forbes article.

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Forbes featured Craig Hart, director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law in "Toothless At First, China’s Carbon Market Could Be Fearsome"

03/02/2021

Forbes featured Craig Hart, director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law in "Toothless At First, China’s Carbon Market Could Be Fearsome"

Yet its appetite for coal is only growing. As of last year China had under construction or in various planning stages more coal-fired capacity—an estimated 249.6 gigawatts—than the current total capacity of either the U.S. or India. “Things are only getting worse,” observed Craig Hart, director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law. 

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Forbes featured College of Health Professions Professor Christen Cupples Cooper in "These New Work-From-Home Meals Could Keep You Happy — And Healthy"

02/25/2021

Forbes featured College of Health Professions Professor Christen Cupples Cooper in "These New Work-From-Home Meals Could Keep You Happy — And Healthy"

"There's growing evidence that individuals who become sick with COVID, but have diets high in whole plant foods that are rich in antioxidants such as vitamins A, C and E, fare better in terms of health outcomes," says Christen Cupples Cooper, the founding director of nutrition and dietetics at Pace University. 

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