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Forbes featured Pace President Marvin Krislov's latest piece: "How We Can Support Students And Support The Recovery"

06/19/2020

Forbes featured Pace President Marvin Krislov's latest piece: "How We Can Support Students And Support The Recovery"

Summertime, for many college students, typically means internships. Not just opportunities to earn money but also opportunities to gain experience, explore their fields, practice what they’ve been learning about in classrooms. For many employers, especially in the nonprofit sector, those interns are a vital source of eager, ambitious young talent, overflowing with new ideas. Internships are how we train the next generation of leaders.

But this summer, too many students and too many employers are concerned that internships, like so many other parts of our normal lives, must be shut down. Even as our state and our country begin to open back up, there are real concerns that in the economically challenging times, organizations won’t be able to pay interns, and students won’t be able to spend a summer working without income.

At Pace University, we’ve launched a new opportunity called New York Recovery Internships. Internships are key to our Pace Path educational model, in which our students get hands-on opportunities working with local employers and organizations. 

This program funds Pace undergraduates to work for nonprofit organizations that are supporting communities in need in and around New York City and Westchester. These students will have a chance to do hands-on work in their communities, putting into practice many of the skills they’ve learned in their classrooms, and the organizations gain highly motivated, well-trained, mentored student interns to help them advance their missions and rebuild their communities. 

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Forbes featured Haub Law Professor Darren Rosenblum in "Supreme Court Protects LGBTQ+ Workers From Sex Discrimination"

06/16/2020

Forbes featured Haub Law Professor Darren Rosenblum in "Supreme Court Protects LGBTQ+ Workers From Sex Discrimination"

As a result of this decision, according to Darren Roseblum, a law professor at Pace University, the law can now “truly implement the goal of treating all people equally without regard to sex, including people of all sexes, gender identities and sexual orientations.”

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Forbes featured Pace President Marvin Krislov's latest piece: "The Resilient Class Of 2020 Will Learn And Grow From The Coronavirus Crisis"

05/21/2020

Forbes featured Pace President Marvin Krislov's latest piece: "The Resilient Class Of 2020 Will Learn And Grow From The Coronavirus Crisis"

Congratulations to the Class of 2020.

They haven’t had the easiest path lately. Higher education has changed remarkably in the last two months. But in some fundamental ways, we’ve kept doing what we always do. We take eager and ambitious young people, introduce them to friends and mentors, help them to learn how to think and how to live, teach them about the fields they want to explore and about themselves as people, and prepare them to be successful members of society, with fulfilling careers and fulfilling lives. The Class of 2020 accomplished all of that—and more. In truth, the unusual circumstances of their final semester doesn’t diminish their accomplishment so much as emphasizes it. They made it to graduation despite an extraordinary situation that made their task even more challenging.

That’s what I was thinking about yesterday when I delivered a graduation speech for the more than 3,600 students at Pace University who earned bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees this spring. Usually, I give versions of the same speech three times: once in our arena in Pleasantville, once for undergraduates at Radio City Music Hall, and once more at Radio City for our graduate students (plus a different speech for our Elisabeth Haub School of Law). This year, I gave it once, via videoconference, from my apartment in Manhattan. In the time of coronavirus, our annual, multi-day series of Commencement events became what we’re calling a “virtual celebration,” recorded in advance and streamed via YouTube.

We’re calling it a “virtual celebration” because we want to make clear that this is not Commencement. These dedicated students earned their degrees, and while we wanted to celebrate their accomplishment, we’re also determined to give them a proper sendoff when we’re able to, with their names called and their diplomas presented and their parents cheering from the stands. 

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Forbes featured Lubin Professor Andrew Coggins in "Cruise Line Industry Chaos Threatens Broadway Licensing Revenue"

05/11/2020

Forbes featured Lubin Professor Andrew Coggins in "Cruise Line Industry Chaos Threatens Broadway Licensing Revenue"

“I can see them making [revues] and song collections free and charging a nominal fee for the full-blown shows,” commented Pace University hospitality professor Andrew Coggins. “Their competition is Las Vegas and Orlando, so they have to deliver a quality entertainment product,” he explained.

“The art is to have the right mix of free and extra charge,” Coggins said.

While executives from Norwegian Cruise Line declined to discuss the future of its licensed musicals, there appear to be few safe harbors for Broadway investors nowadays.

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Forbes featured Pace President Marvin Krislov's latest piece: "How Colleges And The Government Can Upskill Workers And Drive The Recovery"

04/22/2020

Forbes featured Pace President Marvin Krislov's latest piece: "How Colleges And The Government Can Upskill Workers And Drive The Recovery"

It’s becoming a cliché to say that our world has changed. But our world has really, really changed. In February and early March, unemployment was at record lows. Wages were ticking up. Then the pandemic hit. Across the country, people are at home and businesses are shuttered. The International Monetary Fund now says we’re headed for the worst recession since the Great Depression.

The sad truth is that unemployment numbers are likely to get worse before they get better. Millions and millions of Americans are out of work. Even scarier, many of those jobs aren’t coming back.

But there’s an opportunity in this crisis. It’s time to make sure all Americans have access to the education they need to get the higher-skills jobs of tomorrow. It’s time to introduce a GI Bill for upskilling workers, for all Americans and not only veterans. The GI Bill changed America for the better in the decades after World War II; a GI Bill for upskilling workers can transform America after the coronavirus.

From its start, our new normal of social distance has made clear the depth of the divide separating those with skilled jobs who can work remotely and those with unskilled jobs who cannot. Data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics spells it out: Only about five percent of service workers can work from home, while more than half of information workers can. Beyond that, skilled workers aren’t seeing job losses in the same volume, and they’ll be less likely to discover that their jobs no longer exist. Some amount of social distance will be a reality for some time. Even as our economy slowly comes back to life in the next months and years, as people are only able to be out and about in limited, responsible ways, there will still be less need than before for waiters and bartenders, retail workers and cleaning staff. This isn’t just a short-term problem: automation, AI, and machine learning were already threatening many unskilled jobs, and this crisis will only accelerate that shift.

Indeed, this period is clarifying things we’ve long known to be true. College graduates earn far more in their lifetimes than those without college degrees, because the skills they learn in college—not just subject-specific expertise but also soft skills like critical thinking, leadership, and communication—make them much more valuable to employers. Even some college helps increase lifetime earnings, and we’re increasingly seeing that those who already have degrees need and want new training to prepare them for different kinds of work.

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Forbes featured Pace President Marvin Krislov's latest piece: "What We Can All Learn From Nurses"

02/18/2020

Forbes featured Pace President Marvin Krislov's latest piece: "What We Can All Learn From Nurses"

Nurses are the most trusted professionals in America.

That’s the headline of a Gallup poll released last month that asked Americans to rate members of 20-odd professions for their honesty and integrity. An impressive 85% of respondents graded the honesty and ethical standards of nurses as very high or high, a score nearly 20 percentage points higher than the runners-up, engineers. It’s also at least 20 points higher than other medical professionals ranked, including doctors, pharmacists, and dentists. Most impressive, according to the Gallup report, is that this is the 18th consecutive year in which nurses have been ranked as the most honest and trustworthy professionals in the country. 

As the president of Pace University, where we pride ourselves on preparing our students to be effective and enlightened professionals, I wanted to know why it is that nurses do so well — and whether there’s a lesson in these results we can use to help other students be seen as more honest and ethical in their careers.

(For whatever it’s worth, only 49% of respondents ranked college teachers well, although at least that’s better than the 22% who said that lawyers, my former profession, are honest and ethical.)

I turned to Dr. Harriet Feldman, a registered nurse and the dean of our College of Health Professions. Feldman has been the dean of our nursing school for nearly 30 years. She’s also a highly successful and effective leader and, were Gallup to poll me, someone I’d rank exceedingly well on honesty and ethics. 

She thinks the secret is that nurses are compassionate, they’re consistent, and they’re always available when they’re needed.

When you’re in a hospital, Feldman said, “you’re putting your life in the hands of people who are there 24/7, who care about you, who have a commitment to you, who are honest with you.” Nurses are trusted more than doctors, she added, because nurses are seen as standing alongside their patients and advocating for them. “A nurse will advocate for the patient to the physician,” she said, “or help the patient talk to the physician in a certain way to address whatever the issue is.”

To some degree, that’s the inherent nature of a nurse’s role. As Feldman noted, it’s a doctor who gets blamed when things go wrong, because doctors are expected to find cures. Nurses, on the other hand, are expected to make people as comfortable as possible, to be there when needed, and to get the job done. The structure of a hospital is set up to help nurses succeed at those responsibilities, and so they are able to be reliable and trustworthy.

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Forbes featured Pace President Marvin Krislov's latest piece: "Mentorship: Good For The Mentored And Good For Those Mentoring, Too"

01/09/2020

Forbes featured Pace President Marvin Krislov's latest piece: "Mentorship: Good For The Mentored And Good For Those Mentoring, Too"

January is National Mentorship Month, and I’ve been thinking a lot about the Alumni-Student Mentoring Program we launched at Pace University several years ago and put a renewed focus on last year. Today, hundreds of students are participating in the program. They’re getting valuable support, like career guidance, networking opportunities, and interview coaching, and they gain a cheerleader and a confidant.

But what’s been most interesting to me is how valuable this program has been for our alumni mentors.

We tend to think of mentorship as a one-way street. It’s a way for younger people to get insight and guidance, we typically think, and a way for their older colleagues to give back to future generations. Often mentorship programs are operated by an organization and seen by mentors as a way of serving the institution: contributing to an alumni network or an employer’s talent development program.

That’s all true. But I’ve been reminded by the feedback we’ve received from our alumni that mentorship provides real value to those volunteering their time and wisdom, too.

I’ve touched on this when I’ve written before about mentorship, but it’s even clearer to me from these responses that mentorship also offers powerful benefits to working professionals, even more senior ones. Our alumni mentors almost universally report that the work they’re doing with current students is personally rewarding and leaves them impressed with the next generation. But many also tell us that they’re gaining valuable knowledge.

Jay Seagren, for example, is an alumnus and seasoned tech executive who we paired with Samuel Corso, a current undergraduate with a two-year-old app-development startup. Jay has given Sam advice on running a company, interacting with clients, and managing time. But Sam has taught Jay a lot, too.

“I’ve learned so much about start-ups from Sam,” Jay told us. “He’s also taught me how to deal with smaller clients. I’ve learned about technology that is completely different from enterprise solutions.” The bottom line, Jay says, is that exposure to the startup world has been deeply eye-opening. “He forces me to learn more and more,” he says. “I’ve been surprised by how much I didn’t know.”

Read the full Forbes article.

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