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Forbes featured Haub Law Professor Darren Rosenblum's piece: "California Pioneers New Quotas For People Of Color & LGBT People"

10/07/2020

Forbes featured Haub Law Professor Darren Rosenblum's piece: "California Pioneers New Quotas For People Of Color & LGBT People"

California’s state government is nothing if not famous for its progressive legislation. It’s no surprise then that on October 1st, 2020, Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law a mandate on California-headquartered corporations to include on their boards “underrepresented communities” which includes individuals who identify as Black, African-American, Hispanic, Latino, Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American, Native Hawaiian or Alaska Native, or who identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender. While most of the top ten economies now have quotas for sex, this is the first quota in the world to address racial inequality, sexual orientation and gender identity.

While the statute addresses new classes of identity, it mimics California’s recent quota for women, which is still in the process of implementation, and is facing substantial constitutional challenges. That quota copied other countries’ quotas for women on boards. Starting in 2003, Norway required forty percent of boards be women. By 2020, many countries have followed suit, including much of Europe. Quotas use either hard mandates, such as California has pursued, or  softer “comply or explain” rules. The goal is to diversify corporate leadership, which counts men as 96% of its executives and 80% of its board members in many developed economies. Numbers for people of color remain even lower. With a recent 2018 study finding that of the Fortune 100 board members only 19.5% identified as belonging to an underrepresented racial group. The top 10 public companies based in California are barely doing better in 2020 having only 23.5% POC board members. 

These executive numbers perpetuate structural discrimination, since former executives typically become board members. Firms would benefit from improved governance with increased board diversity. One reason the new quota proves so necessary is that while the quota for women has increased women on boards, women of color still comprise a very small number of these board members

Kristin Johnson, a law professor with technology firm expertise, observes the absence of underrepresented women of color serving on the boards of technology firms is deeply disappointing. Given California’s concentration of technology firms in California, the new quota holds tremendous promise to foster inclusion. She notes that board diversity “may foster broader inclusion in the C-Suite as well as among programmers who design, train and develop artificial intelligence and similar sophisticated technologies.” 

Read the full Forbes article. 

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Forbes featured Haub Law Professor Darren Rosenblum's piece: "Mandatory Paternity Leave: The Key To Workplace Equality"

10/02/2020

Forbes featured Haub Law Professor Darren Rosenblum's piece: "Mandatory Paternity Leave: The Key To Workplace Equality"

Switzerland recently passed a law that mandates new fathers take paternity leave. Conservative politicians collected over 50,000 signatures to force a referendum. They dismissed the law as radical, even though it only required ten days of paid leave.  Why require men to take leave when they are not clamoring for it?

Ultimately, by a 3/5 majority, Swiss voters approved the statute. For Switzerland, a relatively conservative country on questions of gender equality, this marks real progress. It makes a small step toward the much more assertive programs to encourage men to take parental leave, such as Sweden’s Parental Leave Act, which gives several additional months of leave to families where both parents take leave. Sweden’s goal was to get women to work and men behind strollers. Switzerland’s ten days seems small change in contrast, but its paternity leave mandate will truly advance work-life balance.  

Why do we have to force men to take leave?  Because men fear the intense stigma of prioritizing their family over work. Work must hold an absolute priority over their lives. This Total Devotion, to use Rosabeth Moss Kanter’s term, means that men miss out on key family moments, from doctor’s appointments to school plays. They miss such experiences not only for work, but also seem to display their availability for work. Although women form nearly half the workforce in most developed countries, men continue to hold the overwhelming majority of management positions, both in the private and public sectors, thanks to Total Devotion.  

Total Devotion prevents men from taking parental leave, even when paid, and even when officially encouraged by an employer. Relatively few men take parental leave. They’re scared of the judgment of their male colleagues – that they are more beholden to their spouse (usually their wives) or children rather than their (usually male) boss or a client. The resulting stigma basically subjects men who take leave to the motherhood penalty. That penalty punishes women with less interesting or less urgent work than what’s available, because employers fear entrusting those who may prioritize family will lead to work left undone or unsatisfied clients.  Parents who serve as caregivers face foregoing interesting work, salary advancement, promotion and other benefits. Work is a competition, and taking leave is laying down one’s arms. 

Read the Forbes column.

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Forbes featured President Marvin Krislov's latest column: "Supporting The Mental Health of College Students During The Pandemic And Beyond"

10/02/2020

Forbes featured President Marvin Krislov's latest column: "Supporting The Mental Health of College Students During The Pandemic And Beyond"

Last year, I wrote about the mental health crisis confronting America’s college and university students. Students are lonely and anxious, I noted then, and according to one major study more than 75 percent of college students said they needed help for emotional and mental health problems.

Then the pandemic happened.

Students’ lives were disrupted as classes moved remote, residence halls shut down, and in some cases family members got sick, lost jobs, or even lost their lives. We faced a national reckoning about systemic racism. School is back in session now, but in a drastically changed world. And problems of student mental health have only increased.

A Boston University study last month found that depression symptoms have tripled among American adults, including college students. Now, 27.8 percent of American adults display symptoms of depression, the study found, compared to 8.5 percent prior to the pandemic. And students face special challenges. Some learning from home with their families struggle to find appropriate environments in which to do remote schoolwork or even adequate technology with which to access classes. Some worry about the ability to pay for college in tougher economic circumstances. Nearly all are missing out on some of the important social and development aspects of college, and they’re worried about the world—and the employment landscape—they’ll graduate into.

The important question is what educators—and parents—can do to support these struggling students.

And the answer is straightforward. We need to be aware, we need to be accepting, and we need to be supportive. We need to recognize that the mental health and wellbeing of young adults will be an ongoing challenge—one that isn’t new to the pandemic, but one the pandemic has exacerbated—and we need to talk about these issues, acknowledge them, and destigmatize them. It is up to all of us to help students get the support they need, and it is up to government, corporations, and foundations to fund those important resources. Bolstering the mental health of young adults is crucial to their success in college and to the productivity of our future workforce.

I’ve recently been involved with two task forces whose work supports this.

At Pace University, we recently convened a group charged with looking at the services, programs, and resources available to our students and finding ways to improve them. It reported its findings over the summer, and the top recommendation was that the best way to encourage greater mental health and wellbeing among our students is to build a culture of mental health and wellbeing.

Just as with physical health, we’re all better off when we take care of ourselves on an ongoing basis rather than deal with problems only when they reach a crisis. As the task force reported, that means making counseling services available on an ongoing and easily accessible basis. It means helping students to build their resilience, so they know how to manage problems and challenges rather than letting them fester. It means encouraging the ongoing work to support mental health and wellbeing, like eating well, getting enough sleep, and exercising. It means that supporting mental health and wellbeing is something we all must work on proactively, not simply expect as a baseline. And it means that everyone in our University community—faculty, staff, student leaders—should be trained on mental health best practices and available resources, so that we all can support students who need help. 

Read the full Forbes article.

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Forbes featured President Marvin Krislov's latest column "Why Higher Education Is All In On NYC"

09/14/2020

Forbes featured President Marvin Krislov's latest column "Why Higher Education Is All In On NYC"

Starting today, businesses, organizations, and people across New York City are gathering together to announce that they’re All In on NYC.

It’s a marketing slogan, but it’s one that serves an important point. The pandemic hit New York State hard in its early days. Tragically, we lost more lives here than in any other state. But then we successfully battled back. Our world-class hospitals and healthcare workers learned how to treat the disease, and how to save lives. Our smart and savvy people took lockdown rules seriously, staying home, staying distant, and wearing masks. And New York City remains a great place for education.

The New York City region is and always has been an amazing place to go to school. As we always say at Pace University, when you come to Pace, New York City is literally your campus. City Hall is across the street from us, the Brooklyn Bridge is next door, and something like a dozen subway lines, which can take you anywhere in any borough, are within a few blocks. There are research opportunities and professional connections, and world-class avenues for channeling your passions, be they creative or entrepreneurial or political or scientific or all of the above. There are passionate, motivated people everywhere.

In the wake of the pandemic, we feared some students might be reluctant to come back to the New York City region. In fact, domestic enrollment numbers have been impressively stable, although we’re enrolling fewer international students this year than usual because of the difficulties in international travel.

They know that New York City is as fantastic a place to go to college as it has always been—and now, in fact, perhaps even better than before. Our recovery can and should be a model for the rest of the country. New York City is always where things happen first.

Read the full Forbes article.

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Forbes featured Haub Law Professor Darren Rosenblum new piece: "Citibank’s New Leader: Do Women On Boards Yield Diverse CEOs?"

09/14/2020

Forbes featured Haub Law Professor Darren Rosenblum new piece: "Citibank’s New Leader: Do Women On Boards Yield Diverse CEOs?"

News from Wall Street rocked the financial world: Citibank named Jane Fraser as its new CEO, making her the first woman to lead a major U.S. financial firm. While her ascension undoubtedly knocks at Wall Street’s glass ceiling, it doesn’t crack it open. It really means that in one firm, the stars aligned in one woman’s favor. To break the glass ceiling for CEOs, firms need more diverse boards.

 One may think that hiring a woman CEO isn’t newsworthy–after all, women have been half of all higher education graduates for decades. But with this announcement, Fraser joins a very exclusive club of only 4% of public company CEOs, since men hold 96% of these top positions. More men named John, or even James, hold CEO positions than all women CEOs combined in the U.S.. Nearly all of them are white–only four CEOs among the top 500 firms are Black– and none is a Black woman.

For women in the leadership pipeline, their male colleagues will be 19 times more likely to attain a CEO position than they will. The cisgender men who run the corporate world exclude women and other sexes and genders from leadership. For Fraser, the CEO position isn’t winning the lottery, because she worked hard for it, but it seems nearly as unlikely. This is only truer for finance as a field, which historically has been one of the most male-dominated. None of the top banks have ever had a woman at the helm.

Fraser’s success matters because it offers a glimmer of hope to women who have been working hard to climb the corporate ladder. Many women drop out of the running because their firms put them on the mommy-track, even as they promote male parents. Additional challenges impede women of color. And as the #MeToo movement made apparent, corporate sexual harassment has chased many employees–mostly women–out of the leadership track.

Read the full Forbes article.

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Forbes featured Pace President Marvin Krislov's latest piece: "To The Class Of 2024: You’re Going To Change The World"

08/21/2020

Forbes featured Pace President Marvin Krislov's latest piece: "To The Class Of 2024: You’re Going To Change The World"

Any day now, members of the Class of 2024 will start arriving on many of America’s college campuses.

It won’t be like move-in days of years past. At a time of social distance and reduced density, of Zoom lectures and FaceTime study groups, there won’t be phalanxes of resident assistants and volunteers shouting greetings and giving high-fives; in many cases, it may not even be possible for parents to drive up, unload the car, and give their student a big farewell hug. Health and safety will require staggered move-ins, limits on visitors, and carefully choreographed unpacking.

And, in some ways, that’s a good thing. It will set the tone for how this year will go, whether on campus or via remote learning. This year will be something different, something special, something embraced by a group of brave and dedicated students. This year will give the Class of 2024 a college experience unlike any other.

These students are embarking on their college careers at an unsettled time for the country. It is a challenging moment, to be sure. But it’s also extraordinary: This is a college class that is living through history. That experience will bind the Class of 2024 together, and it will set these students up for remarkable, meaningful, productive lives. They’re jumping forward into a transforming world, and they will be ready to lead it.

These last five months have been tumultuous. For the foreseeable future, the only constant will remain profound change. Over the next four years, there will be new opportunities in health, the sciences, and government. There will be new outlooks on racial equality, social justice, immigration, and the economy. There will be new technologies, new ways of working, new ways of living. And the remarkable Class of 2024 will be ready for all of it.

When I think about all the many and changing opportunities ahead of these students, and when I think about how committed and resilient they are, I’m every bit as excited as I am at the start of each academic year, if not more so.

Read the full Forbes article.

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