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"Patch" featured Pace University in "Clergy & Law Enforcement Come Together at Pace to Discuss Safety"

10/22/2019

"Patch" featured Pace University in "Clergy & Law Enforcement Come Together at Pace to Discuss Safety"

Rev. Anthony Thompson, a Charleston, S.C. based pastor whose wife Myra was among nine people murdered by a white supremacist during bible study, had a simple and direct message about forging ahead after tragedy: Forgive, unite and work together.

Rev. Thompson was one of the keynote speakers at a conference on October 17 at Pace University entitled Safety & Security for Faith-Based Institutions where more than 150 clergy, community leaders and law enforcement from the region convened to learn facets of keeping their institutions safe at a time where hate crimes, hate groups, and gun violence are on the rise in this country and around the world.

"Forgiveness heals everything – spiritually, physically, and mentally," Thompson told the crowd. "I urge you. I plead with you to forgive whoever you need to forgive. Life will be so much better. It gives you everything positive."

For Rev. Thompson, author of Called to Forgive: The Charleston Church Shooting, a Victim's Husband, and the Path to Healing and Peace, forgiving the shooter was not only a personal story of healing, but a broader one for the city of Charleston, which has a long history of racial strife. "We're not just talking about it in Charleston, we are trying our best to live it in our hearts," he said, referring to vigils, community events and a dialogue that began after the shooting. "We realized from this tragedy that it's time to put our differences behind. It's not only the act of an individual, but an act that changed a community and started a movement."

The conference, a partnership between Pace University and New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services, also featured experts from the FBI, New York State Police, Westchester County Department of Public Safety, Westchester Medical Center, and the Port Authority of NYNJ, among other regional first-responders.

Other highlights of the conference included:

*A threat briefing from Anthony Molloy, supervisory special agent with the Federal Bureau of Investigation's New York Joint Terrorism Task Force that provided background on hate crimes, offenses associated with religious bias, the rise in white supremacy groups, and techniques for detecting and disrupting threats. Between 2000-2018, there have been 277 active shooter incidents – 11 at Houses of Worship -- that killed 884 people and injured 1,546.

*A presentation "Run, Hide, Fight" on how to prepare for, respond to, and survive an active shooter situation with Roger Parrino, senior advisory of security and emergency management at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and Barbara Lee Steigerwald, deputy commissioner, New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services.

*Stop the bleed training with Angela Katz, coordinator of Trauma Injury Prevention Outreach at Westchester Medical Center, who noted that lives are saved or lost in the first few minutes of a shooting or serious trauma. "The only thing more tragic than a death is a death that could have been prevented," Katz said. "You have five minutes to save a life."

*And a law enforcement panel moderated by Pace Professor Len Mitchell, featuring Vincent Beatty, director safety and security, Pace University; Lt. Col. Dan Cooney, assistant deputy superintendent, New York State Police Office of Counter Terrorism & Intelligence; Putnam County Sheriff Robert Langley, Jr.; and Terrance Raynor, deputy police commissioner, Westchester County Department of Public Safety.

The conference is the second of its kind that Pace University and DHSES have collaborated on and co-hosted this year. "At Pace University, we spend a lot of time thinking about how to keep our campuses both vibrant and safe, and we're also proud to educate a great number of future security professionals," said Marvin Krislov, Pace's president. "We know firsthand the challenges faced by faith-based organizations that must serve their communities while also securing their spaces. We're very pleased to be able to bring together faith leaders and security experts so they can share experiences and best practices and ensure safety for all of us."

"Hate has no place in our society and it is incumbent on all of us to do what we can to ensure our communities, especially the most vulnerable, are protected from it," said Patrick Murphy, Commissioner of the State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services. "Today's conference focused on sharing information and best practices for keeping faith-based and religious communities safe from hatred and acts of senseless violence. By implementing some of measures discussed today, these institutions will not only be able to improve the safety and security of their facilities, but the community as a whole as well."

Read the Patch article.

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Press Release: CLERGY & LAW ENFORCEMENT COME TOGETHER TO LEARN STRATEGIES TO KEEP HOUSES OF WORSHIP SAFE

10/21/2019

Press Release: CLERGY & LAW ENFORCEMENT COME TOGETHER TO LEARN STRATEGIES TO KEEP HOUSES OF WORSHIP SAFE

New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services and Pace University Provide Day-Long Conference for Area Religious Leaders

Rev. Anthony Thompson, a Charleston, S.C. based pastor whose wife Myra was among nine people murdered by a white supremacist during bible study, had a simple and direct message about forging ahead after tragedy: Forgive, unite and work together.

Rev. Thompson was one of the keynote speakers at a conference on October 17 at Pace University entitled Safety & Security for Faith-Based Institutions where more than 150 clergy, community leaders and law enforcement from the region convened to learn facets of keeping their institutions safe at a time where hate crimes, hate groups, and gun violence are on the rise in this country and around the world.

“Forgiveness heals everything – spiritually, physically, and mentally,” Thompson told the crowd. “I urge you. I plead with you to forgive whoever you need to forgive. Life will be so much better. It gives you everything positive.”

For Rev. Thompson, author of Called to Forgive: The Charleston Church Shooting, a Victim’s Husband, and the Path to Healing and Peace, forgiving the shooter was not only a personal story of healing, but a broader one for the city of Charleston, which has a long history of racial strife. “We’re not just talking about it in Charleston, we are trying our best to live it in our hearts,” he said, referring to vigils, community events and a dialogue that began after the shooting. “We realized from this tragedy that it’s time to put our differences behind. It’s not only the act of an individual, but an act that changed a community and started a movement.”

The conference, a partnership between Pace University and New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services, also featured experts from the FBI, New York State Police, Westchester County Department of Public Safety, Westchester Medical Center, and the Port Authority of NYNJ, among other regional first-responders.

Other highlights of the conference included:

  • A threat briefing from Anthony Molloy, supervisory special agent with the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s New York Joint Terrorism Task Force that provided background on hate crimes, offenses associated with religious bias, the rise in white supremacy groups, and techniques for detecting and disrupting threats. Between 2000-2018, there have been 277 active shooter incidents – 11 at Houses of Worship -- that killed 884 people and injured 1,546.
  • A presentation “Run, Hide, Fight” on how to prepare for, respond to, and survive an active shooter situation with Roger Parrino, senior advisory of security and emergency management at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and Barbara Lee Steigerwald, deputy commissioner, New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services.
  • Stop the bleed training with Angela Katz, coordinator of Trauma Injury Prevention Outreach at Westchester Medical Center, who noted that lives are saved or lost in the first few minutes of a shooting or serious trauma. “The only thing more tragic than a death is a death that could have been prevented,” Katz said. “You have five minutes to save a life.”
  • And a law enforcement panel moderated by Pace Professor Len Mitchell, featuring Vincent Beatty, director safety and security, Pace University; Lt. Col. Dan Cooney, assistant deputy superintendent, New York State Police Office of Counter Terrorism & Intelligence; Putnam County Sheriff Robert Langley, Jr.; and Terrance Raynor, deputy police commissioner, Westchester County Department of Public Safety.

The conference is the second of its kind that Pace University and DHSES have collaborated on and co-hosted this year. “At Pace University, we spend a lot of time thinking about how to keep our campuses both vibrant and safe, and we’re also proud to educate a great number of future security professionals,” said Marvin Krislov, Pace’s president. “We know firsthand the challenges faced by faith-based organizations that must serve their communities while also securing their spaces. We’re very pleased to be able to bring together faith leaders and security experts so they can share experiences and best practices and ensure safety for all of us.”

“Hate has no place in our society and it is incumbent on all of us to do what we can to ensure our communities, especially the most vulnerable, are protected from it,” said Patrick Murphy, Commissioner of the State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services. “Today’s conference focused on sharing information and best practices for keeping faith-based and religious communities safe from hatred and acts of senseless violence. By implementing some of measures discussed today, these institutions will not only be able to improve the safety and security of their facilities, but the community as a whole as well.”

About Pace University

Pace University has a proud history of preparing its diverse student body for a lifetime of professional success as a result of its unique program that combines rigorous academics and real-world experiences. Pace is ranked the #1 private, four-year college in the nation for upward economic mobility by Harvard University’s Opportunity Insights, evidence of the transformative education the University provides. From its beginnings as an accounting school in 1906, Pace has grown to three campuses, enrolling 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in more than 150 majors and programs, across a range of disciplines: arts, sciences, business, health care, technology, law, education, and more. The university also has one of the most competitive performing arts programs in the country. Pace has a signature, newly renovated campus in New York City, located in the heart of vibrant Lower Manhattan, next to Wall Street and City Hall, and two campuses in Westchester County, New York: a 200-acre picturesque Pleasantville Campus and a Law School in White Plains. www.pace.edu

About DHSES

The Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services (DHSES) provides leadership, coordination and support for efforts to prevent, protect against, prepare for, respond to, and recover from terrorism and other man-made and natural disasters, threats, fires and other emergencies. For more information, visit the DHSES Facebook page, follow @NYSDHSES on Twitter and Instagram or visit dhses.ny.gov.

 

 

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"News12" featured Pace University in "‘Expect the unexpected:’ Reverend offers safety advice at Pace security conference"

10/18/2019

"News12" featured Pace University in "‘Expect the unexpected:’ Reverend offers safety advice at Pace security conference"

A safety and security conference was held at Pace University, bringing together faith leaders and members of law enforcement, including the FBI, Homeland Security, and state and local officers.

The Rev. Anthony Thompson was the keynote speaker at the event.

Thompson’s wife was one of nine people gunned down at church bible study in South Carolina by a 21-year-old white supremacist in 2015. His message Thursday was to all faith-based institutions: in these times, in which we live, expect the unexpected.

“How do you react, how you do prepare if someone is coming into your church and home,” said Thompson. “Unfortunately, some people think it could not happen. That is the biggest hurdle.”

The conference comes on the heels of a rise in hate in the Hudson Valley. This week, a man wearing a yarmulke with a swastika pinned to it was spotted in two dining establishments.

In recent days, swastikas were drawn in Pelham Middle School in Pleasantville High School. Anti-Semitic graffiti and a hateful poster were found last week in the Holocaust Garden of Remembrance in White Plains.

Law enforcement leaders say taking safety precautions as soon as possible is mandatory.

Watch News12 clip.

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"FiOS1 News" featured Pace President Marvin Krislov in "Protecting Places of Worship"

10/18/2019

"FiOS1 News" featured Pace President Marvin Krislov in "Protecting Places of Worship"

Pace University along with the NY division of Homeland Security held a conference on safety and security for faith-based institutions.

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Pace Students Rally in Albany for Student Aid Funding During the Annual New York Student Aid Alliance Advocacy Day with More than 1,000 High School and College Students from Across New York featured in "Pleasantville Patch"

02/20/2018

Pace Students Rally in Albany for Student Aid Funding During the Annual New York Student Aid Alliance Advocacy Day with More than 1,000 High School and College Students from Across New York featured in "Pleasantville Patch"

Patch: "Pace Students Rally in Albany for Student Aid"

In the photo left to right: Larissa Szilagyi, STAFF – Program Coordinator, Office of Government and Community Relations, Pace alumna, class of 2017; Deidre Neafsey, a New York City-based senior in the Dyson School of Arts and Sciences; Jenna Hager, a New York City-based junior in the Pforzheimer Honors College; Emerald Rodriguez, a Pleasantville-based junior in the College of Health Professions; Bill Colona, Director, Office of Government and Community Relations.

From "Patch:"

More than 1,000 high school and college students from across New York gathered in Albany earlier this week to advocate for student aid funding during the annual New York Student Aid Alliance Advocacy Day.

Bundy Aid, the Arthur O. Eve Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP), the Science and Technology Entry programs (STEP/C-STEP), the Liberty Partnerships Program (LPP) and the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) saw proposed funding cuts of a combined $50 million in this year's Executive Budget. On Tuesday, students met with lawmakers from across the state to urge them to restore critical student aid funding.

During a student "speak-out," high school and college students shared their personal stories about the value of student aid programs and opportunity programs like Bundy Aid, the Arthur O. Eve Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP), the Science and Technology Entry programs (STEP/C-STEP), the Liberty Partnerships Program (LPP) and the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP).

"Pace University offered me robust educational programs, incredible student leadership opportunities, and a stellar network for internships that have prepared me to enter the workforce," said Jenna Hager, a senior in the Pforzheimer Honors College. "Without a combination of generous scholarships and grants from Pace, and the state's Tuition Assistance Program, I wouldn't have been able to attend my dream school."

Students from about 65 public and private, not-for-profit campuses attended the rally to show their support for student aid programs and urge lawmakers to restore student aid funding. A virtual Advocacy Day was held simultaneously on Twitter with students and supporters from across the state sharing stories about what student aid and opportunity programs have meant to them using the hashtag #StandUp4StudentAid.

"The experience that Pace University has given me throughout the past few years has helped develop me into someone I am proud to be. Throughout my time at Pace I've had various leadership roles and challenging courses, and have been able to be a part of something bigger than myself," said Emerald Rodriguez, a junior in the College of Health Professions. "Because of these opportunities, I have grown into someone who is well-rounded and ready to be a part of the working world; none of this would have been possible without programs like the state's Tuition Assistance Program and the generous scholarships Pace has offered me."

Students across New York rely on student aid programs to enable them to achieve their college dreams. For example, Bundy Aid, a 50-year-old state aid program that provides funds for student aid and other student assistance at private, not-for-profit colleges and universities. Bundy Aid benefits nearly 500,000 students on those campuses across the state. The Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) serves more than 300,000 New Yorkers attending college, providing them with more than $900 million in student aid.

The New York Student Aid Alliance is a coalition of colleges and universities and other stakeholder organizations that support funding vital student aid programs for students in New York. This is the 10th year the organization has hosted an Advocacy Day in Albany.

Read the article.