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Harriet Feldman | PACE UNIVERSITY

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"Pleasantville Patch" featured Dean of Pace's College of Health Professions Harriet R. Feldman and Assistant Professor Christen Cupples Cooper in "Pace Creates Masters Program In Nutrition and Dietetics"

05/08/2018

"Pleasantville Patch" featured Dean of Pace's College of Health Professions Harriet R. Feldman and Assistant Professor and Founding Director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program Christen Cupples Cooper in "Pace Creates Masters Program In Nutrition and Dietetics"

Pace University's College of Health Professions (CHP) is launching a new Coordinated Master of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics program on Pace's Pleasantville campus. The program will offer concentrations in culinary nutrition and food policy/food justice while also fully preparing students to practice nutrition in a clinical setting.

The two-year, full-time coordinated program is the only one in the area where students are matched with and complete their internship of 1,200 required dietetic hours while attending classes. This model allows students to immediately apply their skills and knowledge in "real life" environments, including local food and hunger organizations, restaurants, hospitals, markets and farms.

Students in the program will be trained to serve as responsible practitioners, leaders, and innovators who will make positive impacts on nutrition outcomes. The program offers concentrations in culinary nutrition and food policy/food justice while fully preparing students to practice in a variety of settings. Students will share CHP's Interprofessional Center for Healthcare Simulation with other health professions disciplines. Graduates of this program will be eligible to sit for the Registered Dietitian exam.

Christen Cupples Cooper, EdD, RDN, a Registered Dietitian-Nutritionist (RDN), food and nutrition researcher, and nutrition education expert is the Assistant Professor and Founding Director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program.

"Our aim is to educate a group of students who go into the workforce with the skills to help people to make healthful food choices, cook affordably and deliciously and lead happy, productive lives. We emphasize hands-on learning, enjoyment of food and promoting lifelong good health," said Dr. Cooper.

"We are delighted to add Nutrition and Dietetics to our growing academic programs in the College of Health Professions," said Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean of Pace's College of Health Professions. "This program offers great opportunities for interprofessional collaboration across our College."

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"Women in Higher Education" featured Dr. Harriet Feldman of the College of Health Professions, Pace University in "Nursing Educator Builds Future Generations"

04/10/2018

"Women in Higher Education" featured Dr. Harriet Feldman of the College of Health Professions, Pace University in "Nursing Educator Builds Future Generations"

As the United States faces a nursing crisis, Dr. Harriet Feldman of the College of Health Professions/Lienhard School of Nursing Pace University NY works to educate not only nurses who will fill crucial roles in contemporary health care, but also develop nursing educators who will keep the field thriving. Throughout her years at Pace, Feldman, who is dean and professor of the nursing school, has sought innovative ways to grow the nursing profession as well as increase diversity.

Early Career
Like many women in the mid-1960s, after high school Feldman enrolled in a nursing program. Shortly before graduating the diploma program, a faculty member suggested she continue her education and pursue a bachelor’s degree. Wanting to get to work, she took a job, but also decided to take one course. That course made her want to continue her education.

As Feldman progressed, leaders in nursing kept encouraging her to push further—earning bachelor’s and master’s degrees. She didn’t see herself as a future leader, but she enjoyed the education and found a passion for nursing. Toward the end of her master’s program, she was asked if she wanted to teach, so she did a bit of it while finishing her master’s and then became a full-time instructor.

After getting married and starting a family, she went back into clinical practice, but part of her role was teaching hospital staff. Feldman began to see the bigger picture—not only was she having an impact on the patients with whom she directly interacted, but, through training others, she was having an impact on many other patients as well. She made the decision to commit to a career in nursing education—earning a doctorate and taking on greater and greater leadership roles.

Changes in Nursing
Since the late 1960s, Feldman has been a proponent of moving nursing forward and giving the profession greater prestige. The first graduate course she taught was in change theory.

“I had taken a similar course myself, but teaching it was such a different kind of experience—preparing for it, working closely with the students,” says Feldman. “That set the stage for my interest in making change for the greater good. My path early in my career and even now is because I’m a risk-taker. I like the idea of making an impact and doing something to help this profession.”

In 1993, Feldman became dean of Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing, and with that, her influence solidified. Thanks to forward-thinking educators, nursing has evolved, starting with more stringent educational requirements to become a registered nurse. Today’s nursing requires more critical thinking and evidence-based practice.

“The thing that’s changed the whole landscape is the technology that we use in health care,” Feldman says. “I don’t mean just the electronic records, but the equipment. The changes help inform people so they can make better decisions.”

Pace was an early adopter of technology in the curriculum,\ such as blackboard sites. This enabled the development of hybrid (mixing online and onsite) graduate courses as well as online courses. Feldman keeps informed on technological advances and tries to introduce them at Pace as soon as possible.

Feldman says faculty members have been committed to making Pace’s nursing program stellar. Data is gathered and analyzed on student success. The professors have been open to revising curricula and approaches so as to maximize student outcomes—the goal being 100 percent success on licensure exams. It’s also important to ensure the faculty have all the tools they need.

“I send them to conferences regularly for development in terms of teaching strategies and content,” says Feldman. “People have said how welcome they feel here and how the culture is so supportive.”

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"Westchester County Business Journal" featured Pace College of Health Professions Health Center in "Pace opens expanded university health care center in Pleasantville"

04/09/2018

"Westchester County Business Journal" featured Pace College of Health Professions Health Center in "Pace opens expanded university health care center in Pleasantville"

Pace University made history in 1978 when it opened the first-ever nurse-managed medical facility on the campus of a U.S. college. Forty years later, the school celebrated the anniversary and renewed its commitment to the program with the completion of a new and expanded health care center.

Pace held a ribbon cutting Thursday, April 5 for the new 2,000-square-foot health center space inside the Paton House, which also hosts Pace’s career services office. The health care center features four patient exam rooms, a procedure room and lab. It also has a larger reception area than the previous location, which was in the college’s Goldstein Fitness Center.

About 1,700 patients – a mix that is mostly students but also includes staff, faculty and even alumni – are treated by the school’s health center annually. With that number growing, Pace College of Health Professions Dean Harriet R. Feldman, said it was time to expand.

“We needed a lot more space because we were seeing a lot more students,” said Harriet R. Feldman, dean of Pace’s College of Health Professions. “This space is about three times the size of what we had before, and we’re already starting to see more students show up at the door.”

The previous location had also become a bit too noisy for a health care facility, Feldman said. Renovations to the fitness center last year placed a weight room directly above the health center, requiring staff to work through barbell-induced thuds.

The new location puts the health center near three residence halls. “It’s easy access for the students,” Feldman said. “They don’t have to go down the hall and through the gym. They’re right next door.”

The health center is staffed by three nurses, including two nurse practitioners whom receive assistance primarily from student employees. The staff can treat most common illnesses, prescribe or refill medications, order lab and radiology tests and refer students to specialty care.

“It’s pretty much all of your primary care services,” Feldman said.

The health center also acts as a clinical setting for nursing students in the Pace College of Health Professions.

Feldman said students typically have insurance through family plans or through the school. The university opened the health center as part of its celebration of 40 years on campus. Pace was the first in the country to use nurse practitioners to operate its health center, which Feldman said has become a model for the rest of the country.

Pace also plans to open a new health center on its New York City campus later this year.

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"Daily Voice" featured Dean Harriet Feldman and Associate Director of University Health Care Karen Martin in "Pace Opens New Health Care Center On Pleasantville Campus"

04/09/2018

"Daily Voice" featured Dean Harriet Feldman and Associate Director of University Health Care Karen Martin in "Pace Opens New Health Care Center On Pleasantville Campus"

From left to right, Pace Dean Harriet R. Feldman, Karen Martin of UHC, Ellen Rich, Jamie Newland, Andréa Sonenberg. (back row) Lillie M. Shortridge-Baggett, UHC Director Audrey Hoover, and Marykate Aquisto of state Sen. Terrence Murphy's office.

Pace University opened a new and enlarged health care center on its Pleasantville campus on Thursday, April 5, celebrating the 40th anniversary of its University Health Center.

The first nurse-managed academic health care service on a university campus in the United States, UHC opened its doors at Pace in 1977. A novel concept at the time, the use of nurse practitioners is now common practice in primary care.

UHC offers a wide range of primary health care services and its leading-edge care continues to be a model, nationally and internationally.

The new Pace location, which moved from the Goldstein Fitness Center to the Paton House, is approximately 2,000-square-feet with four patient exam rooms, a procedure room, larger reception area and a lab.

More than 1,700 patients, including students, staff, faculty, alumni, and their families are treated there each year.

UHC’s nurse practitioners can treat most common illnesses, prescribe or refill medications, order lab and radiology tests, and refer to speciality care. Considered in network to multiple health care insurance providers, UHC also acts as a clinical setting for nursing students and preceptorships.

“This new facility will allow us to see more patients in a more comfortable setting and we have already begun to see an increase in patients,” said Harriet R. Feldman, dean of Pace’s College of Health Professions. “We are carrying on a great tradition of patient-centered healthcare in a new, more modern facility that will better serve our campus community.’’

In honor of the milestone, Dean Feldman and Karen Martin, associate director of University Health Care, accepted a proclamation from the office of state Sen. Terrence Murphy.

The day’s activities began with a conference “University Health Care at 40: Emerging Trends in Primary Care,” which examined the evolution of the role of nurse practitioner and successful trends in health care. The conference included a panel of nurse practitioners who helped build and shape UHC throughout the years.

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