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Hillary Knepper | PACE UNIVERSITY

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"City and State" featured Hillary Knepper, chairwoman of the Pace University Department of Public Administration in "Education - Without the Anxiety"

11/13/2018

"City and State" featured Hillary Knepper, chairwoman of the Pace University Department of Public Administration in "Education - Without the Anxiety"

...Pace University, for instance, has agreements with several municipalities under which their employees receive tuition discounts. Through a partnership with the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, the university also offers federal employees discounted tuition for three graduate programs, including a master’s degree in public administration.

“That professionalization of the public service – as well as the nonprofit and health care sectors – is supported both through the university and thought the employers,” said Hillary Knepper, chairwoman of the Pace University Department of Public Administration.

Read the article on page 28.

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Associate Dyson Professor Hillary Knepper is quoted in "City and State New York" about how Changing Political and Technological Landscapes are Making Advanced Degrees More Crucial Than Ever

02/26/2018

Associate Dyson Professor Hillary Knepper is quoted in "City and State New York" about how Changing Political and Technological Landscapes are Making Advanced Degrees More Crucial Than Ever

City and State New York: "Brave New World"

The Changing Political and Technological Landscapes are Making Advanced Degrees More Crucial Than Ever

“I think a lot of my students today really want to learn how to look at evidence, data and trends in order to figure out: how do we transform that into the civil society that we hope to build?” said Hillary Knepper, chairwoman of Pace University’s public administration department.

 Regardless of how the political pendulum swings, the business of delivering government services and educating the next generation of public servants has no choice but to adapt. “Politics is cyclical in nature, but the needs are there and they don’t fundamentally change,” Knepper said.

“State and local government and nonprofits are going to step up,” Knepper said, “so you might have fewer opportunities at one level, but you’re going to have more opportunities at other levels.”

While any public affairs program will strive to provide students with an interdisciplinary toolkit for analyzing changes in the political environment, Knepper said that “politics can in some ways be informative but it can also be a distraction because our public services have to move forward no matter who in office.”

“The reason for getting that graduate education is really to open up new ideas, new pathways in your thinking,” Knepper said, adding that master’s in public administration students are trained to “turn a critical eye toward how we get the business of government done.”

Knepper added, “We many all have very different opinions, but we all agree – fundamentally. I think, across the political spectrum – that we need to be asking: How do we use data, how do we use information to really try to make the best decision possible?”

“Education has gotten a lot more accessible and I think it’s critical that we take advantage of that as citizens interested in public service…because that accessibility is what’s going to change society,” Knepper said. “Education changes the world.”

Read the full article pages 24-28.