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Inside Higher Ed | PACE UNIVERSITY

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Inside Higher Ed featured Dyson’s new M.S. in Applied Quantitative Analysis and Policy in "Colleges start new academic programs"

06/23/2020

Inside Higher Ed featured Dyson’s new M.S. in Applied Quantitative Analysis and Policy in "Colleges start new academic programs"

Pace University is starting an M.S. in applied quantitative economic analysis and policy.

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Inside Higher Ed featured Pace University’s partnership the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in "Higher Ed Next"

06/05/2020

Inside Higher Ed featured Pace University’s partnership the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in "Higher Ed Next"

3. Seize opportunities for sharing and new-model partnerships.
Higher ed is a system in name only. One of the defining characteristics of the American model of higher education – like the American system of religion – is competition, with institutions having distinct missions and constituencies and strengths, and each competing for students, resources, and prestige. At the same time, faculty often resemble independent contractors or artisans.

Higher education might use the crisis as an opportunity to experiment with new models of course and content sharing and expanded collaboration with cultural institutions, including museums and archives. To take an example, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History has partnered with Pace University to deliver a Master’s program for teachers that features prize-winning historians and instituted regular online conversations with leading scholars and writers for teachers nationwide.

One promising possibility is to encourage sharing and remixing of course content. Let edX disaggregate course content and allow remixing and seize this moment to live up to its original vision.

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"Inside Higher Ed" featured Pace University in "Converse and Pace Go Test Optional"

11/11/2019

"Inside Higher Ed" featured Pace University in "Converse and Pace Go Test Optional"

Converse College and Pace University are now test optional for admissions.

A statement from Jamie A. Grant, vice president for enrollment management at Converse, in South Carolina, said, “Converse’s test-optional admissions process will broaden access for those high-achieving students who have been underrepresented at colleges and universities. Based on recent data, standardized tests do not accurately represent a student’s potential for success. At Converse, we take a personalized and holistic approach to our students’ education and it only makes sense that we apply that approach to our admissions process as well.”

Pace, in New York, issued this statement on its decision: "Pace University recognizes the value in reviewing an application holistically and many factors are taken into consideration. Most important is academic achievement (including class rank, if provided), followed by the personal essay and letters of recommendation."

Pace will continue to require the SAT or ACT of athletes, applicants for some scholarships, applicants to the combined accounting B.B.A./M.B.A. or four-year B.S. in nursing program, students who were homeschooled and students from outside the United States.

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"Inside Higher Ed" featured Pace University's vice president of enrollment Robina Schepp in "A Gap Year Students Can Get Credit For"

09/16/2019

"Inside Higher Ed" featured Pace University's vice president of enrollment Robina Schepp in "A Gap Year Students Can Get Credit For"

...The Verto program stands out compared to other gap years because it is a freshman year. Core requirements for freshmen are taken, so students later enter college as second-semester freshmen in the spring or sophomores in the fall.

During the program, students can earn up to 16 credits a semester. Of the four courses offered per location, two are country specific and the other two are general education. These all-program required courses include a college writing and rhetoric class and an identity and politics class.

"[Gordon] had noted there were families interested in doing a gap year, but oftentimes parents were concerned that their children would not be earning credit at this time," said Robina Schepp, vice president of enrollment at one of Verto's partners, Pace University.

"We were interested because we knew that students who were interested in doing a gap year were looking for a nontraditional experience and looking to grow," Schepp said. "Those students still want the opportunity to earn some college credit."

To date 25 students have applied to Pace through Verto. Because those students were conditionally admitted to Pace, they will receive further advisement to make sure that all their Verto credits will be applicable to their major at Pace.

"In general it's a nationwide trend that students come to college with more credit either through AP or bridge programs with their local college or community colleges," Schepp said.

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"Inside Higher Ed" featured President Marvin Krislov in "New SAT Score: Adversity"

05/17/2019

"Inside Higher Ed" featured President Marvin Krislov in "New SAT Score: Adversity"

Marvin Krislov, president of Pace University (which requires applicants to submit SAT or ACT scores), said he thought the index "could be one of several helpful data points" used by admissions officers to get a better sense of an applicant.

But Krislov, who was general counsel at the University of Michigan when it successfully defended an affirmative action policy before the U.S. Supreme Court, stressed that he did not see the index taking the place of affirmative action. That's because the index is ultimately not about the individual student.

The index "can only tell a certain part of the story," Krislov said. "It won’t let admissions officers know if the student has overcome a major disability or illness. Or if the student has experienced a significant loss."

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"Inside Higher Ed" featured Pace University in "Let’s Focus Innovation on Social Mobility"

05/30/2018

"Inside Higher Ed" featured Pace University in "Let’s Focus Innovation on Social Mobility"

Parsing the Data

The Equality of Opportunity Project offers a helpful guide. Using federal tax returns dating to the 1940s, Social Security records and data from IPEDS, EoP studied whether attainment actually is associated with upward mobility. The result of this effort has been the production of “mobility report cards,” which give us a common metric to track over time.

The analysis is based on the product of two calculations: the percentage of students an institution admits from low-income backgrounds, or access, and the proportion of graduates who increase their earnings by their mid-30s, or success rate. In other words, how many low-income students do institutions serve, and how effective are they at serving them? Each institution is then assigned a mobility rate, the percentage of students from low-income backgrounds who improve their earnings over time compared to their parents and thus manage to climb the income ladder.

Mobility rates help shed light on institutions that are moving the needle on driving social mobility and those that are not. Although EoP makes no such claims, we believe a reasonable interpretation of their work reveals a new breed of “top-tier” colleges and universities.

Institutions like California State University at Los Angeles and Pace University top the list with mobility rates of 9.9 percent and 8.4 percent, respectively. Other institutions, such as the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (7.6 percent), City College of New York (7.2 percent), and the University of Texas El Paso (6.8 percent) also show staggering results in facilitating upward mobility.

In fact, looking through a mobility lens, these colleges, most of which are less selective, outperform their more selective peers across the board. Some, in fact, are entirely open access and offer credit-bearing online courses to help accelerate time to completion.

By comparison, elite colleges lag, with mobility rates hovering between 1 and 2 percent over all. Low-income students who attend elite colleges have a good chance of moving into a higher economic stratum -- a low-income Harvard student is as likely to enter the 1 percent after graduating as a wealthy Harvard student is -- but elite institutions graduate few low-income students in total. Their educational models are hardly accessible to the masses, let alone scalable.

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