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Karl Coplan | PACE UNIVERSITY

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Queens Chronicle featured Director of Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic and Professor Karl Coplan in "Commonpoint bringing the classroom to you"

04/17/2020

Queens Chronicle featured Director of Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic and Professor Karl Coplan in "Commonpoint bringing the classroom to you"

To celebrate Earth Day on Wednesday, April 22, Professor of Law at Pace University and Director of Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic Karl Coplan will lead the discussion, “What does it mean to live a sustainable life?” From 12 to 1:15 p.m., Coplan will discuss whether it is possible to live within a truly sustainable carbon footprint while still living well, and whether an individual can make a true difference by sharing his own personal journey to cut back on his own carbon emissions without decreasing his quality of life. Coplan’s discussion is based on his own book, “Live Sustainably Now: A Low-Carbon Vision of the Good Life.”

Read the full Queens Chronicle aritcle.

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Energy Wire featured Elisabeth Haub Law Professor Karl Coplan in "Democrats and energy: 4 issues to watch"

03/05/2020

Energy Wire featured Elisabeth Haub Law Professor Karl Coplan in "Democrats and energy: 4 issues to watch"

Karl Coplan, a law professor at Pace University said that the size of the proposal and the fact that it doesn’t require cooperation from Congress could be a big deal, “That’s an interesting executive power that a lot of people don’t talk about,” he said. “That could have a huge impact on the industry.”

Read the full Energy Wire article (PDF).

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Hudson Valley One featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law professor Karl Coplan in "Ready to go on a “carbon diet”?"

01/17/2020

Hudson Valley One featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law professor Karl Coplan in "Ready to go on a “carbon diet”?"

If you’re seriously worried about whether your descendants will have a livable planet 50 years from now, and beginning to wonder if you’ll have one yourself even ten years from now, you’re probably also thinking about what an individual can do (beyond recycling religiously) to slow the juggernaut of climate change. You’re also probably wondering if it’s possible to shrink your carbon footprint significantly without giving up all of life’s little amenities. What are the options for those who would like to make climate awareness part of their daily lives but don’t want to go off the grid?

Karl Coplan has made a commitment to be a living example of how this is indeed a doable thing. A professor of Law at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University and director of the Pace Environmental Litigation Clinic since 1994, Coplan is the principal outside counsel for Riverkeeper, Inc. He started out his career clerking for chief justice Warren Burger, and in more recent years has been kept busy litigating lawsuits enforcing the Clean Water Act and other environmental laws in the Catskills and Hudson Valley. But even outside of work, he’s walking (and paddling) his talk.

Read the full Hudson Valley One article.

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Phys.Org featured environmental law Professor Karl Coplan's new book in "A guide to the good, low-carbon life"

01/15/2020

Phys.Org featured environmental law Professor Karl Coplan's new book in "A guide to the good, low-carbon life"

For about the last 10 years, environmental law professor Karl Coplan has been trying to winnow down his direct carbon-dioxide emissions with the goal of reaching four tons per year—about 40 percent of the average American's. He has been successful, and has just published a book, "Live Sustainably Now," chronicling his efforts. Half treatise, half diary, it offers an entertaining guide for others.

Living in a house in the suburbs north of New York City, Coplan faces challenges in an area where cars rule and individual homes can gobble large amounts of energy. Nevertheless, he consistently comes in under budget. Some of his methods are obvious: buying an electric car, eating less red meat, cutting down on air travel. Some could be viewed as extreme, or at least not for everyone; on some days he gets to his job across the Hudson River by biking to the riverbank, kayaking across a heavily trafficked stretch of water, and picking up a second bike on the other side. But he does seem to have lots of fun, and you don't hear him complain about things he misses.

Coplan teaches at Pace University. His book is published by Columbia University Press. We spoke with him recently.

Read the full Phys.Org article.

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The Chronicle of Higher Education featured Karl Coplan, director of environmental litigation at Pace University’s law school in "The Thanksgiving-Winter Break Boomerang: Is All That Travel Really Necessary?"

12/11/2019

The Chronicle of Higher Education featured Karl Coplan, director of environmental litigation at Pace University’s law school in "The Thanksgiving-Winter Break Boomerang: Is All That Travel Really Necessary?"

Other experts also had ideas. Arielle Helmick, managing director of the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society, suggested institutions evaluate how they’re enabling climate change and then take steps like divesting from fossil fuels. Kevin J.H. Dettmar, director of the humanities center at Pomona College, started purchasing carbon offsets from the National Forest Foundation to balance out the emissions produced by visiting speakers. And Karl Coplan, director of environmental litigation at Pace University’s law school, went one step further, suggesting that faculty could teleconference instead of traveling long distances for conferences or speaking engagements.

All agreed that the role for higher education might not be in vastly reducing carbon emissions but in setting an example. “There's no magic bullet for climate change,” Thompson said. “It's going to require lots of people to do things that require people to solve the problem. Whatever contribution universities can make, needs to be made.”

Read the full The Chronicle of Higher Education article.

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"Politico" featured the Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Environmental Law Program professor Karl Coplan in "Get ready for the climate marathon"

09/05/2019

"Politico" featured the Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Environmental Law Program professor Karl Coplan in "Get ready for the climate marathon"

...Most of the Democratic candidates back implementing a Green New Deal and renewing the United States' commitment to the Paris climate agreement, and they’ve set a timeline to cut emissions. But tonight could offer more insight into where the candidates differ. Karl Coplan, professor of law in the Environmental Law Program at Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law, told ME nuances could emerge like on how they'd deal with nuclear energy or natural gas, their plan's impact on gas prices and whether they'd implement a carbon tax.

Coplan pointed specifically to the importance of getting more clarity on how candidates will actually put their proposals into effect. "There's kind of a mixed history in environmental legislation generally about congressional goals without implementation measures," he said, listing the Clean Water Act as an example. A lot, he said, depends on "just how tough the implementation measures are going to be." 

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