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Kimberly Collica-Cox | PACE UNIVERSITY

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NBC featured Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Kimberly Collica-Cox in "Prison Dog Training Programs Rehabilitate Canines and Cons"

06/18/2020

NBC featured Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Kimberly Collica-Cox in "Prison Dog Training Programs Rehabilitate Canines and Cons"

Kimberly Collica-Cox, associate professor of criminal justice at Pace University in New York, has studied how the symbiotic relationship between humans and dogs can be useful in prisons. Collica-Cox helped develop a program through Pace that uses animal assisted therapy to teach incarcerated mothers better parenting skills.

“What we find is that dogs can trigger feelings of safety in humans, which will allow them to sort of open up and communicate more, which can be very helpful in a correctional setting,” she said, adding that there’s a great deal of research to support these findings.

Read the full NBC article.

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ABC News featured Pace Dyson Professor Kimberly Collica-Cox in "Coronavirus Closings: NY, NJ schools and universities closed amid COVID-19 outbreak"

03/12/2020

ABC News featured Pace Dyson Professor Kimberly Collica-Cox in "Coronavirus Closings: NY, NJ schools and universities closed amid COVID-19 outbreak"

Michelle Charlesworth reports on Pace University reverting to online learning amid coronavirus fears.

School closings are following the coronavirus outbreak that continues to impact the New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut region, with more schools and universities closing or announcing modifications to lessen the risk of community spread.

 

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CBS Chicago featured Dyson Professor Kimberly Collica-Cox in "Two New Programs At Kane County Jail Aim To Use Dogs To Help Improve Inmate Behavior"

02/14/2020

CBS Chicago featured Dyson Professor Kimberly Collica-Cox in "Two New Programs At Kane County Jail Aim To Use Dogs To Help Improve Inmate Behavior"

Parenting, Prison & Pups is a multi-year study of the effect of dogs on incarcerated women in New York by the Good Dog Foundation and Pace University’s Dyson College.

Nationally, 70% of inmates are mothers of children under age 18.

The hypothesis is that parenting skills taught behind bars are better retained if animals come to class. New York-based researcher Dr. Kimberly Collica-Cox told CBS 2 that preliminarily, depression is down and self-esteem is up.

Read the full CBS Chicago article.

 

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"NY Daily News" featured Pace University's associate professor of criminal justice and security Kimberly Collica-Cox in "Jailed NY mothers learning parenting and coping skills from therapy dogs"

12/02/2019

"NY Daily News" featured Pace University's associate professor of criminal justice and security Kimberly Collica-Cox in "Jailed NY mothers learning parenting and coping skills from therapy dogs"

Cuddly therapy dogs are giving mothers behind bars a new leash on life.

About 10 women in the Westchester County Jail are learning how to deal with their emotions and be better moms with the help of friendly pooches.

“Look at his face, he is being so extra today!” squealed 32-year-old Yosmarils Cotto as she threw her arms around Mambo, a service dog that trotted into the jail chapel.

Cotto broke into a smile as the 6-year-old black Labrador Retriever rolled over for a belly rub.

“That’s my boy right there,” said Cotto, who is facing an assault charge. "Mambo was my best friend when I was down, when I was happy, when I was mad. He was always there.”

Mambo is a canine companion from the The Good Dog Foundation, which provides the pooches as part of the Parenting, Prison & Pups program run by the jail and Pace University’s Criminal Justice Department.

“There’s no other facility that incorporates therapy dogs within a structured parenting curriculum...We’re able to form a community while we’re here, and the women really see the dogs as part of that community," said class director Kimberly Collica-Cox, an associate professor of criminal justice and security at Pace. “(The pups) provide a normalization factor...and the women feel the dogs were really able to sense when they were down, when they were depressed. They bring a lot of joy to the program."

The animals, first brought into the jails in 2017, also help teach jailed women how to better engage with their children.

Read the full NY Daily News article.

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"News12" featured Pace's Parenting, Prison and Pups program in "Parenting, Prison and Pups: Incarcerated women in Westchester learn parenting skills"

10/09/2019

"News12" featured Pace's Parenting, Prison and Pups program in "Parenting, Prison and Pups: Incarcerated women in Westchester learn parenting skills"

A program called Parenting, Prison and Pups is helping incarcerated women learn to be better parents while coping with being separated from their children.

In many cases, women go months without seeing their children while incarcerated.

The Westchester County Jail is taking a unique approach, combining therapy dogs with parenting classes as part of a Pace University program.

The program teaches women basic parenting skills and allows them to care for and interact with the dogs. Organizers hope the bonds created will lead to better relationships with their families after they're released.

Watch the News12 video clip.

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"Correctional News" featured Pace's Criminal Justice Professor in "Kimberly Collica-Cox"

04/09/2019

"Correctional News" featured Pace's Criminal Justice Professor in "Kimberly Collica-Cox"

Pace University Criminal Justice Professor Kimberly Collica-Cox, Ph.D., who has spent more than 20 years working with incarcerated populations and implementing programs to support them, has been named to the Westchester County Correction Advisory Board. Westchester County Executive George Latimer signed an executive order creating the nine-member board to provide the Department of Correction with advice on programs and services for inmates, as well as ways to reduce recidivism. Collica-Cox is a certified Prison Rape Elimination Act and American Correctional Association auditor and serves as a professional trainer in the cross-section between HIV and incarceration. Since 1997, she has worked with inmates, correctional staff, and community-based service providers. At Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, she serves as the advisor to the Criminal Justice Society and Alpha Phi Sigma student organizations. Collica-Cox runs the Parenting, Prison and Pups (PPP) program at the Westchester County Jail in Valhalla, volunteering her time as the program’s director and lead trainer.

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"Taylor and Francis Online" featured Professor Kimberly Collica-Cox's new article in Women and Criminal Justice: "When Doing Gender in the Joint: Perceptions of Being an Effective Woman Leader in Corrections"

04/09/2019

"Taylor and Francis Online" featured Professor Kimberly Collica-Cox's new article in Women and Criminal Justice: "When Doing Gender in the Joint: Perceptions of Being an Effective Woman Leader in Corrections"

With the growth of female corrections executives, further study regarding their experiences in the upper ranks is needed. This study, based on quantitative and qualitative data through firsthand accounts and survey analysis, examined women’s own and others’ perceptions of the women’s experiences as corrections executives. Participants completed a study-designed questionnaire and individual structured interviews. Despite the field’s male dominance, women found acceptance of their leadership positions among corrections staff. Results indicated that despite instances of gender bias, most departments and their staff members were supportive of women leaders and perceived them to be as capable and as effective as their male counterparts. The study raised an important issue for institutional corrections as to whether the presence of higher-ranking women influences lower-ranking women to consider upward mobility in ways they might not if only men held these positions.

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