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"Biography" featured Robert F. Kennedy Jr. in "12 Notable Members of the Kennedy Family"

08/14/2019

"Biography" featured Robert F. Kennedy Jr. in "12 Notable Members of the Kennedy Family"

As the first-born son of Robert and Ethel Kennedy, Robert F. Kennedy Jr. (b. 1954) was nine years old when his uncle JFK was assassinated and 14 when he lost his own father.

In honor of RFK Sr., Kennedy attended Harvard and got his law degree at the University of Virginia. He also earned his Masters of Law degree at Pace University, where he would later teach as a professor of environmental law.

As an environmental lawyer and activist, Kennedy worked at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) as a senior attorney (1986-2017) and the Hudson, New York waterways nonprofit called Riverkeeper as its chief prosecuting attorney (1984-2017). He has also authored multiple books and published essays regarding environmental issues.

Also known for his anti-vaccine stance, Kennedy has come under fire from both the public and his family in recent years.

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"LA Progressive" featured Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow Mimi Rocah in "What Happened When Bernie Sanders Went on the Joe Rogan Experience: Exactly What the Establishment Fears"

08/12/2019

"LA Progressive" featured Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow Mimi Rocah in "What Happened When Bernie Sanders Went on the Joe Rogan Experience: Exactly What the Establishment Fears"

...Bernie Sanders is once again facing endless smear pieces and attacks from the mass media. The owners of the “left-center” corporate media hate Bernie, they are threatened by him, and they want him to lose. From the Washington Post to MSNBC, Sanders faces a constant onslaught of hostility. Mimi Rocah stating that Bernie “makes her skin crawl” as a “political analyst” perfectly encapsulates this pre-programmed hostility.

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"Raw Story" featured Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow Mimi Rocah in "Ex-prosecutor explains what will happen with the ongoing cases against Epstein after his jailhouse suicide"

08/12/2019

"Raw Story" featured Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow Mimi Rocah in "Ex-prosecutor explains what will happen with the ongoing cases against Epstein after his jailhouse suicide"

With high-powered hedge fund manager Jeffrey Epstein dead of apparent suicide before he could be tried for child sex trafficking, many are wondering what happens to the pending — and ongoing — cases against him.

Former federal prosecutor Mimi Rocah did her best to sum up what happens, and what should happen, next with MSNBC’s Joy Reid.

“The important people are the people Jeffrey Epstein victimized and trafficked to other people,” Reid began. “What happens regarding the previous plea deal that he was able to get, a very sweet deal where he could leave jail six days a week to go and have a private car pick him up and take him to work? The fact that that happens, what happens to any cases that deal with that, that deal with the prosecutors and whoever was involved in letting this guy essentially walk the first time. What happens to those cases, or is there a case? Is there a way to still hold people to account? ”

“Well, there is still a civil proceeding pending in Florida,” explained Rocah. “And there are now new, you know, criminal investigations, as I understand it, at the state level in Florida, all looking into that plea deal, and there is an investigation in the Department of Justice and the Office of Professional Responsibility. All of those, frankly, will be the least affected by this, in the sense that, those are focused on the actions of law enforcement and prosecutors in Florida at the time, you know, Acosta, as we know, the Florida sheriff, so those in some ways will be the least affected, and will still, I think, be able to provide some small, hopefully measure of justice for these victims.”

“I think part of getting justice for the victims is getting answers to the question of how in the world this was allowed to happen, that he got such a sweet deal the first time around, I don’t even want to call it a sweet dial, such a travesty of justice, a failure of our justice system,” added Rocah. “I think those answers are still very much worth pursuing, regardless of where Jeffrey Epstein is or frankly even how he died. Those are obviously important questions too, but I think getting answers to what happened the first time around is very very important to our justice system going forward, to these victims personally. I think those will be pursued and I hope we will get some light and answers on those.”

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"Law & Crime" featured Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow Mimi Rocah in "Legal Experts ‘Dumbfounded’ by Decision to Remove Epstein From Suicide Watch"

08/12/2019

"Law & Crime" featured Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow Mimi Rocah in "Legal Experts ‘Dumbfounded’ by Decision to Remove Epstein From Suicide Watch"

Mimi Rocah, who spent 17-years at SDNY, agreed with Honig.

“No, I don’t recall one either,” she responded. “Absolutely have seen defendants/targets who committed suicide but usually when at home or about to be apprehended.”

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"Register Citizen" featured Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law's executive director of the Energy and Climate Center Karl Rabago in "CT shared solar plan nears approval as debate remains heated"

08/12/2019

"Register Citizen" featured Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law's executive director of the Energy and Climate Center Karl Rabago in "CT shared solar plan nears approval as debate remains heated"

...“This is a government program, over-embroidered, highly brocaded and not necessarily ever able to free stand,” said Karl Rabago, a former utility regulator and executive who is now executive director of the Energy and Climate Center at Pace University Law Center. Rabago has also consulted for various groups in the state and was a member of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering (CASE) team that studied the need for a pilot shared clean energy project and advised going ahead with a full program, not a pilot.

Katie Dykes, who ran the DEEP energy division at the time and now is the department’s commissioner, said she has heard the complaints and proposed changes after the draft rules were published in May. Some were accepted, others not.

“Some of those requirements are put there to protect ratepayers, to protect consumers, to assure that the customers this program was designed to benefit are actually going to obtain the benefits,” she said. “The whole purpose of this program is to address climate change. That’s the primary driver here.”

Rabago worries that the many requirements could cause the effort to backfire, however.

“I believe the administrative burdens might outweigh the consumer protection benefits,” he said.

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"NBC News" featured Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow Mimi Rocah's piece "Pipe-bomber Cesar Sayoc's lawyers named Trump in their defense. They won't be the only ones."

08/08/2019

"NBC News" featured Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow Mimi Rocah's piece "Pipe-bomber Cesar Sayoc's lawyers named Trump in their defense. They won't be the only ones."

Mimi Rocah, currently a Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow at Pace University Elisabeth Haub School Law, served as an assistant U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York from 2001 to 2017. Rocah is an NBC and MSNBC legal analyst.

By Mimi Rocah, former assistant U.S. attorney and NBC/MSNBC legal analyst

As our country debates how President Donald Trump’s rhetoric incites racism and violence, one place his words and conspiracy theories unquestionably have had a parallel impact is in criminal courtrooms.

Already, defendants have begun raising objections to cases that include witnesses who have cooperated with federal authorities (which happens in the majority of federal criminal cases, from gang violence to fraud) because Trump has repeatedly used the biggest megaphone in the country to say that “flippers” (as he calls them) should be illegal. Now, we are seeing the emergence of the “Trump made me do it” defense in criminal cases — or at least the “Trump influenced me” mitigation.

Take, for example, Cesar Sayoc, who for two weeks terrorized the public by sending almost daily pipe bombs to public officials and private citizens alike based on their political affiliations. Sayoc was caught in 2018 living in a van covered in dozens of Trump pictures and decals attacking the media. In March of 2019 he pleaded guilty to 65 counts, including using weapons of mass destruction and the illegal mailing of explosives with intent to kill or injure.

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Sayoc could have been sentenced to life imprisonment — the recommended sentence under the federal sentencing guidelines — but his lawyers cited Trump’s words and arguments in their attempt to secure a lighter sentence. They argued that their client was a cognitively limited, sexual abuse survivor who thought of Trump as a “surrogate father” and came to believe in an “alternative reality” fueled in part by the president’s attacks on his political opponents. Sayoc, his attorneys wrote in a sentencing memo filed in federal court in New York on Monday, was a Trump “super fan” and “began to consider Democrats as not just dangerous in theory, but imminently and seriously dangerous to his personal safety.”

Ultimately, Judge Jed S. Rakoff sentenced Sayoc to 20 years in prison, a technically lighter sentence than what prosecutors asked for although practically speaking, it could mean life in prison for the 57-year-old defendant.This sentence was based largely on the judge’s acceptance of Sayoc’s argument that he did not intend for the bombs to detonate and hurt anyone, contrary to prosecutors' arguments. However, the judge did note that Sayoc’s troubled life, including his infatuation with Trump and his view of the president’s political enemies as demons, played a role. Rakoff was clear that Sayoc was not “insane in the technical legal sense of that word… [but] he clearly became obsessive and paranoiac, and it was in this state, made still worse by his steroid abuse, that he decided to commit the crimes for which he is now to be sentenced.”

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