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"Westchester Rising" featured Pace Law Professor Leslie Garfield Tenzer in "Pace Law Professor’s Podcast a Big Hit"

01/24/2019

"Westchester Rising" featured Pace Law Professor Leslie Garfield Tenzer in "Pace Law Professor’s Podcast a Big Hit"

Pace Law professor Leslie Garfield Tenzer’s podcast, “Law to Fact” recently celebrated its first anniversary and has been downloaded nearly 35,000 times. She describes the podcast as “the go-to podcast for students in law school, going to law school or studying for the bar.”

The podcast episodes often center on a discussion with fellow law professors and discuss key topics in core law school classes. So far, Tenzer has covered areas including personal jurisdiction, homicide, proximate cause, landlord-tenant law, will contests, the statute of frauds, the Commerce Clause, and more.

“I’m always looking to explore new technological outlets and I wanted to provide students with unique learning tools,” Tenzer explained. “I had noticed that podcasts were gaining in popularity, so it seemed like making podcasts would be a way to impart information while providing me with an opportunity to learn a new medium.”

“At Pace Law, we bridge the gap between legal theory and practice and make the concepts discussed inside the classroom relevant and interesting,” said Dean Horace Anderson. “Professor Tenzer’s podcast is just one example of this and how our faculty make law school and legal concepts accessible to all.”

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"Miami Herald" quoted Law Professor Leslie Garfield Tenzer in "Hundreds of 15-year-old brides in Missouri may have married their rapists"

03/14/2018

"Miami Herald" quoted Law Professor Leslie Garfield Tenzer in "Hundreds of 15-year-old brides in Missouri may have married their rapists"

...Overall, statutory rape cases come in three varieties, said Leslie Garfield Tenzer, a law professor at Pace University in New York:

“There are the sick cases,” she said, “the teacher sleeping with the child, or the 29-year-old sleeping with the child. That’s an easy case.

“Then you have the case in which the parent alerts the authorities and pushes for it. The parent is irate.” Those, too, tend to get prosecuted, she said.

But the third and thornier type is one in which the law has clearly been broken, but neither the child, partner nor parents are complaining.

“When you have a crime,” Tenzer said, “basically you’re saying that the defendant wronged society. Convicting someone gives the family of the victim some sense of retribution, it maybe rehabilitates the defendant and it is a deterrence to society: Don’t do this.

“But if you have this girl who’s in love with this guy, we really don’t need to rehabilitate them. We don’t necessarily need retribution if the parents understand that there’s love there. And the question is, ‘Do we want to take the time of prosecutors and taxpayers’ money for a case to basically send a message to the rest of the world?’”

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"The Kansas City Star" quoted Law Professor Leslie Garfield Tenzer in "Hundreds of Missouri’s 15-year-old brides may have married their rapists"

03/13/2018

"The Kansas City Star" quoted Law Professor Leslie Garfield Tenzer in "Hundreds of Missouri’s 15-year-old brides may have married their rapists"

...Overall, statutory rape cases come in three varieties, said Leslie Garfield Tenzer, a law professor at Pace University in New York:

“There are the sick cases,” she said, “the teacher sleeping with the child, or the 29-year-old sleeping with the child. That’s an easy case.

“Then you have the case in which the parent alerts the authorities and pushes for it. The parent is irate.” Those, too, tend to get prosecuted, she said.

But the third and thornier type is one in which the law has clearly been broken, but neither the child, partner nor parents are complaining.

“When you have a crime,” Tenzer said, “basically you’re saying that the defendant wronged society. Convicting someone gives the family of the victim some sense of retribution, it maybe rehabilitates the defendant and it is a deterrence to society: Don’t do this.

“But if you have this girl who’s in love with this guy, we really don’t need to rehabilitate them. We don’t necessarily need retribution if the parents understand that there’s love there. And the question is, ‘Do we want to take the time of prosecutors and taxpayers’ money for a case to basically send a message to the rest of the world?’”

In Idaho, the judge sent exactly that message. Heather Strawn’s marriage to Aaron meant nothing.

Read the full article.