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"Haitian Times" featured Lienhard School of nursing's Carol Roye in "Precision Medicine and the Haitian-American Community"

07/29/2019

"Haitian Times" featured Lienhard School of nursing's Carol Roye in "Precision Medicine and the Haitian-American Community"

Precision medicine is on its way to becoming the medical treatment of the future, but people of color may get left out of it completely to the detriment of their health.

To rectify this, the Maranatha French Church of SDA, a prominent Haitian-American church in St. Albans, held a presentation by All of Us, a research group that wants to close the gap in how people of color are aided by the medical community.

The idea behind precision medicine is to come up with a drug protocol that works with an individual of a particular background and environment as opposed to using current medicine that only uses research from white males over 60, according to Carol Roye, an Associate Dean for Scholarship at Pace University. By getting the biological makeup of people from varying ethnic backgrounds, genders and settings medicine could be better personalized for distinct groups or individuals.

“You might find that certain medications for diabetes may be very helpful to this population and some of them might not be,” according to Roye. “They would have no way of knowing that unless they had this database and tried the different medications on people of Haitian descent.”

Conducting the study are nurses from The American Association of Colleges of Nursing in conjunction with Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing in Manhattan with a $20,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health, and their goal is to get one million samples from different populations.

“I was talking yesterday to a woman from Haiti who was there and every night she was taking Advil for eight days when she wasn’t feeling well,” said Roye on July 13. “When she came back [to New York] and her doctor took her blood test, he told her she had kidney failure. Her doctor told her to stop taking the Advil and her condition started to reverse. She wasn’t even taking too much. If we finish this study, something like that could be prevented.”

Helping to spread the word at the church was Jean Chris Romulus, the executive director of Heal Haiti, a non-profit that encourages young adults to get into healthcare to help save lives.

Romulus learned about the research being done at Pace from Heal Haiti founder Gretha Fievre, an educator at Pace and prominent leader at her church.

“Pace wanted an organization to include African-American people and it was easy for them to see my group always working to help the Haitian community and to see Gretha as a teacher at the institution to help do the outreach,” said Romulus. “We did a media blast and reached about 1,200 people and offered that service to the American Association of Colleges.”

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"Psychiatry Advisor" featured Pace New York's Counseling Psychologist Faedra R. Dagirmanjian in "Sensible Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Depression Treatment"

06/20/2019

"Psychiatry Advisor" featured Pace New York's Counseling Psychologist Faedra R. Dagirmanjian in "Sensible Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Depression Treatment"

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is often stigmatized, so it is not surprising that the disease goes undiagnosed and undertreated in certain populations. Ethnic and racial minorities, as well as young people, may be challenged by their own attitudes toward seeking care for MDD. MDD is a major health burden globally — with 5% to 7% of the population reporting such symptoms annually — clinicians and researchers are seeking ways to reduce the burden of illness and provide access to treatment.

While MDD is more pervasive in the white population, blacks are more likely to experience long-term, chronic, and debilitating depression. As research is underway to better understand the cumulative effect of social oppression in ethnic and racial groups, risk factors known to contribute to poor mental health include low income, socioeconomic positioning, and unemployment.

To help clinicians make more appropriate treatment choices, the Patient-Centered Culturally Sensitive Health Care is an assessment tool that enables them to see health disparities and how they can provide more individualized care. Patients whose clinicians have used the tool reported higher satisfaction with their treatment.

Knowing that certain patients are less likely to seek help for depression may also alert clinicians to intervene sooner. Overall, 39% of black women and 30% of black men vs 51% of men who are not of African descent were likely to seek treatment.

A study of working-class men (N=12; mean age, 40.42 years) found that they have difficulty acknowledging depression and are consequently reluctant to seek treatment, due to the social stigma. The qualitative study conducted by psychologists James R. Mahalik, PhD, from Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, and Faedra R. Dagirmanjian, PhD, from Pace University, New York City, conducted in-depth interviews with men who worked in mostly male-dominated manual labor.

As to why the men did not seek help for depression or sadness, the main themes focused on weakness and loss of masculinity for doing so. Some examples of what provided  relief for the men included speaking with women about their problems and experiencing trust during discussions.

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"Daily Voice" featured Dean Harriet Feldman and Associate Director of University Health Care Karen Martin in "Pace Opens New Health Care Center On Pleasantville Campus"

04/09/2018

"Daily Voice" featured Dean Harriet Feldman and Associate Director of University Health Care Karen Martin in "Pace Opens New Health Care Center On Pleasantville Campus"

From left to right, Pace Dean Harriet R. Feldman, Karen Martin of UHC, Ellen Rich, Jamie Newland, Andréa Sonenberg. (back row) Lillie M. Shortridge-Baggett, UHC Director Audrey Hoover, and Marykate Aquisto of state Sen. Terrence Murphy's office.

Pace University opened a new and enlarged health care center on its Pleasantville campus on Thursday, April 5, celebrating the 40th anniversary of its University Health Center.

The first nurse-managed academic health care service on a university campus in the United States, UHC opened its doors at Pace in 1977. A novel concept at the time, the use of nurse practitioners is now common practice in primary care.

UHC offers a wide range of primary health care services and its leading-edge care continues to be a model, nationally and internationally.

The new Pace location, which moved from the Goldstein Fitness Center to the Paton House, is approximately 2,000-square-feet with four patient exam rooms, a procedure room, larger reception area and a lab.

More than 1,700 patients, including students, staff, faculty, alumni, and their families are treated there each year.

UHC’s nurse practitioners can treat most common illnesses, prescribe or refill medications, order lab and radiology tests, and refer to speciality care. Considered in network to multiple health care insurance providers, UHC also acts as a clinical setting for nursing students and preceptorships.

“This new facility will allow us to see more patients in a more comfortable setting and we have already begun to see an increase in patients,” said Harriet R. Feldman, dean of Pace’s College of Health Professions. “We are carrying on a great tradition of patient-centered healthcare in a new, more modern facility that will better serve our campus community.’’

In honor of the milestone, Dean Feldman and Karen Martin, associate director of University Health Care, accepted a proclamation from the office of state Sen. Terrence Murphy.

The day’s activities began with a conference “University Health Care at 40: Emerging Trends in Primary Care,” which examined the evolution of the role of nurse practitioner and successful trends in health care. The conference included a panel of nurse practitioners who helped build and shape UHC throughout the years.

Read the article.