main navigation
my pace

Lubin Press | PACE UNIVERSITY

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"CNN Business" featured Lubin associate dean and social media and mobile marketing Professor Randi Priluck in "Instagram rolls out new feature to help fight bullying"

10/02/2019

"CNN Business" featured Lubin associate dean and social media and mobile marketing Professor Randi Priluck in "Instagram rolls out new feature to help fight bullying"

Earlier this year, Instagram head Adam Mosseri declared that the social network wants to "lead the fight against online bullying." On Wednesday, the social media platform announced a new effort in that daunting task: it's rolling out globally a feature called "Restrict," a tool it's been testing since July. When you "Restrict" another user, comments on your posts from that person are only visible to them, and not to other people. Restricted users also won't be able to see if you're active on Instagram at any given moment or if you've read their direct messages.

Users can also opt to make a restricted person's comments show up for others by approving their comments. "The fact that Instagram is doing something is better than nothing," said Randi Priluck, a professor and associate dean at Pace University focused on social media and mobile marketing. "But the question is: How much will this help?" Fifty-nine percent of US teens have been bullied or harassed online, according to a 2018 study from Pew. Another study conducted by a non-profit anti-bullying group found that 42% of cyberbullying victims between the ages of 12 and 20 said they were bullied on Instagram. Instagram's reasoning for developing Restrict is that young Instagram users may be wary of blocking, unfollowing or reporting a bully because it could make the situation worse. Blocking or unfollowing the person could also make it harder to keep tabs on the bully's behavior. If Restrict works as intended, it could offer a way for users to protect themselves without notifying the person who is bullying them. Instagram is launching Restrict mode worldwide.

Read the full article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"WalletHub" featured Lubin School of Business Professor Andrew Coggins insights in "Best Airline Credit Cards"

09/25/2019

"WalletHub" featured Lubin School of Business Professor Andrew Coggins insights in "Best Airline Credit Cards"

The best airline credit cards have initial bonuses worth $200 to $500+ in airfare. They also give at least 2 miles per $1 spent on flights and charge annual fees as low as $0. But not all credit cards with miles are the same. On the one hand, there are airline credit cards with miles for a specific airline. There are also credit cards with miles for any airline – or any travel expense, for that matter.

You can find both types of airline credit cards below. To help you land the right miles credit card for your particular needs, WalletHub’s editors compared more than 1,000 credit card offers based on how many miles they’d allow different types of travelers to earn, as well as how much those miles would be worth when redeemed for airfare, with annual fees taken into account. Below, you can see the best miles cards that emerged from this comparison in first class. 

10 Best Airline Credit Cards of 2019

*Lufthansa Credit Card - Best Airline Credit Card Overall

*Gold Delta SkyMiles® Credit Card from American Express - Best Delta Credit Card

*Citi® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® World Elite™ Mastercard® - Best American Airlines Credit Card

*Southwest Rapid Rewards® Priority Credit Card - Best Southwest Airlines Credit Card

*United MileagePlus Explorer Credit Card - Best United Airlines Credit Card

*Alaska Airlines Credit Card - Best Alaska Airlines Credit Card

*JetBlue Card - Best Airline Credit Card with No Annual Fee

*JetBlue Business Credit Card - Best Airline Credit Card for Business

*Bank of America® Premium Rewards® credit card - Best Rewards Card for Any Airline

*LATAM Secured Credit Card - Best Airline Credit Card for Bad Credit

The type of credit card miles you should target depends on how often you travel, whether or not you usually fly with the same airline, and how comfortable you are booking airfare through an airline rather than a travel-comparison website. Credit cards with miles for a specific airline generally give you the most miles when you purchase flights directly from that airline. Similarly, how much emphasis you place on secondary benefits such as free baggage and airport lounge access depends on how much you’d actually use those perks.

Your credit standing will play a role, too. Most of the best credit cards with miles require good credit or excellent credit for approval. You can check your credit score for free on WalletHub to get a sense of your chances. Continue reading below to learn more about the best airline miles credit cards and the best travel miles credit cards available right now. 

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"FOX 61" featured Pace marketing professor Larry Chiagouris in 'Shootings and shock value: Hoodies, PSA use similar tactics"

09/20/2019

"FOX 61" featured Pace marketing professor Larry Chiagouris in 'Shootings and shock value: Hoodies, PSA use similar tactics"

In a breezy back-to-school video spot, angelic children describe their beloved new headphones, sneakers, skateboard. Soon, though, a disturbing reality dawns on the viewer: Those cherished new belongings are merely tools to foil a school shooter stalking the children.

And in a fashion show last week, the fashion brand Bstroy offered a sort of back-to-school vision of its own, with models showing off hoodies emblazoned with the names of four schools touched by mass shootings, rent by what appeared to be bullet holes.

Both used shock value to make a point about gun violence — and both are dealing with different levels of reaction, some positive and, in the case of the fashion show, a lot of it negative.

...It is also worth questioning whether a lavishly produced video spot was the best way to deliver Sandy Hook Promise’s message, said Pace University marketing professor Larry Chiagouris, pointing out the nonprofit sells clothing, too.

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Newsweek" featured Lubin's clinical professor of Management Bruce Bachenheimer in "Uber's response to California Worker Bill is Legal Ploy That Denies Drivers Fair Deal"

09/17/2019

"Newsweek" featured Lubin's clinical professor of Management Bruce Bachenheimer in "Uber's response to California Worker Bill is Legal Ploy That Denies Drivers Fair Deal"

Uber's response to a landmark California bill seeking to strengthen benefits for workers in the gig economy is a "legal ploy," labor experts told Newsweek.

On Wednesday, the California Assembly passed AB5, a bill that would force a range of businesses to designate contractors, including ride-share drivers and food delivery workers, as employees and therefore offer them benefits. But ride-sharing company Uber responded to the legislation by claiming it would not reclassify its workers as employees — a move that necessitates claiming that its drivers are not a core component of its business. Lyft told Vox that it also did not plan to reclassify its workers. A Lyft spokesperson told Newsweek "our focus right now is on finding a new path forward and getting a deal done between us, Labor and the Governor."

"Claims that their workers aren't central to their business [are] broadly recognized as a legal ploy rather than an accurate description of their workforce," Erin Hatton, an expert on labor and labor movements at the University of Buffalo, told Newsweek.

The legislation, which Governor Gavin Newsom has said he intends to sign, codifies a test laid out in a California Supreme Court ruling last year. In order for a company to claim that a worker is a contractor, it must prove that the worker is a) free from the control and direction of the hirer b) the worker isn't performing work that is central to the company and c) the worker is engaged in an independently established trade.

Uber, which did not respond to Newsweek prior to publication, has said that it can pass the so-called ABC test to and claim its workers are contractors.

Valerio De Stefano, a professor of labor law at Belgium's University of Leuven, disagreed.

"Being able to decide your own hours is not the final criteria on which you decide whether somebody is an employee or not," de Stefano said. He described what Uber and Lyft are trying to accomplish with their efforts as "schemes that basically circumvent the law" by "using the workers as if they were their employees" — a model he said is "not a fair deal" for contractors.

Other states, including Massachusetts, Virginia and New Jersey, already have some form of ABC law in place, according to the Verge, and de Stefano said that other states would likely follow suit.

While labor advocates have cheered the law, others have raised concerns that it could be damaging to the flexible schedules of contractor work and thereby limit worker freedom. The legislation will likely have wide-ranging impacts, affecting companies far beyond Lyft and Uber, leading some experts to raise questions about how to improve regulation without being overbearing.

"Is clamping down on this hurting progress and the evolution of the market?" Bruce Bachenheimer, a clinical professor of Management at Pace University said to Newsweek.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Associated Press" featured Lubin Professor Larry Chiagouris in "145 CEOs speak out on gun violence, urging Congress to act"

09/13/2019

"Associated Press" featured Lubin Professor Larry Chiagouris in "145 CEOs speak out on gun violence, urging Congress to act"

Pace University marketing professor Larry Chiagouris called the letter a “no-cost, low-risk, low-impact PR move” that’s not likely to affect the gun debate because the companies didn’t specify any consequences if the laws don’t change.

“Does it get them good vibes with the anti-gun world? Yes. Does it give them bad vibes to people who belong to the NRA? No,” he said. “Gun supporters will be oblivious.”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed