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Adammendler.com – Thirty Minute Mentor featured President Marvin Krislov in "Paying It Forward"

10/08/2020

Adammendler.com – Thirty Minute Mentor featured President Marvin Krislov in "Paying It Forward"

Over the years I have interviewed hundreds of America’s top leaders and a question I love asking is: “What is one thing everyone should do to pay it forward?” Here are the answers I received to that question from a handful of top leaders:

Marvin Krislov, President of Pace University: Mentoring. Everyone in a leadership role — and really just everyone — should be willing to mentor people. I know I’ve benefited a lot from people who are willing to take their time, not knowing whether I would really take advantage of their advice, to help me learn and understand thing. And I know that it’s very fulfilling for me to be able to fill that role for others. Just last week I got a really nice email from a former student at Michigan who thanked me for encouraging her to skip law school and become a New York City Teaching Fellow — today she’s pursuing her passion and building schools for refugees around the world. That kind of thing is ultimately why we’re all in higher education.

Read the full blog.

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Forbes featured President Marvin Krislov's latest column: "Supporting The Mental Health of College Students During The Pandemic And Beyond"

10/02/2020

Forbes featured President Marvin Krislov's latest column: "Supporting The Mental Health of College Students During The Pandemic And Beyond"

Last year, I wrote about the mental health crisis confronting America’s college and university students. Students are lonely and anxious, I noted then, and according to one major study more than 75 percent of college students said they needed help for emotional and mental health problems.

Then the pandemic happened.

Students’ lives were disrupted as classes moved remote, residence halls shut down, and in some cases family members got sick, lost jobs, or even lost their lives. We faced a national reckoning about systemic racism. School is back in session now, but in a drastically changed world. And problems of student mental health have only increased.

A Boston University study last month found that depression symptoms have tripled among American adults, including college students. Now, 27.8 percent of American adults display symptoms of depression, the study found, compared to 8.5 percent prior to the pandemic. And students face special challenges. Some learning from home with their families struggle to find appropriate environments in which to do remote schoolwork or even adequate technology with which to access classes. Some worry about the ability to pay for college in tougher economic circumstances. Nearly all are missing out on some of the important social and development aspects of college, and they’re worried about the world—and the employment landscape—they’ll graduate into.

The important question is what educators—and parents—can do to support these struggling students.

And the answer is straightforward. We need to be aware, we need to be accepting, and we need to be supportive. We need to recognize that the mental health and wellbeing of young adults will be an ongoing challenge—one that isn’t new to the pandemic, but one the pandemic has exacerbated—and we need to talk about these issues, acknowledge them, and destigmatize them. It is up to all of us to help students get the support they need, and it is up to government, corporations, and foundations to fund those important resources. Bolstering the mental health of young adults is crucial to their success in college and to the productivity of our future workforce.

I’ve recently been involved with two task forces whose work supports this.

At Pace University, we recently convened a group charged with looking at the services, programs, and resources available to our students and finding ways to improve them. It reported its findings over the summer, and the top recommendation was that the best way to encourage greater mental health and wellbeing among our students is to build a culture of mental health and wellbeing.

Just as with physical health, we’re all better off when we take care of ourselves on an ongoing basis rather than deal with problems only when they reach a crisis. As the task force reported, that means making counseling services available on an ongoing and easily accessible basis. It means helping students to build their resilience, so they know how to manage problems and challenges rather than letting them fester. It means encouraging the ongoing work to support mental health and wellbeing, like eating well, getting enough sleep, and exercising. It means that supporting mental health and wellbeing is something we all must work on proactively, not simply expect as a baseline. And it means that everyone in our University community—faculty, staff, student leaders—should be trained on mental health best practices and available resources, so that we all can support students who need help. 

Read the full Forbes article.

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Forbes featured President Marvin Krislov's latest column "Why Higher Education Is All In On NYC"

09/14/2020

Forbes featured President Marvin Krislov's latest column "Why Higher Education Is All In On NYC"

Starting today, businesses, organizations, and people across New York City are gathering together to announce that they’re All In on NYC.

It’s a marketing slogan, but it’s one that serves an important point. The pandemic hit New York State hard in its early days. Tragically, we lost more lives here than in any other state. But then we successfully battled back. Our world-class hospitals and healthcare workers learned how to treat the disease, and how to save lives. Our smart and savvy people took lockdown rules seriously, staying home, staying distant, and wearing masks. And New York City remains a great place for education.

The New York City region is and always has been an amazing place to go to school. As we always say at Pace University, when you come to Pace, New York City is literally your campus. City Hall is across the street from us, the Brooklyn Bridge is next door, and something like a dozen subway lines, which can take you anywhere in any borough, are within a few blocks. There are research opportunities and professional connections, and world-class avenues for channeling your passions, be they creative or entrepreneurial or political or scientific or all of the above. There are passionate, motivated people everywhere.

In the wake of the pandemic, we feared some students might be reluctant to come back to the New York City region. In fact, domestic enrollment numbers have been impressively stable, although we’re enrolling fewer international students this year than usual because of the difficulties in international travel.

They know that New York City is as fantastic a place to go to college as it has always been—and now, in fact, perhaps even better than before. Our recovery can and should be a model for the rest of the country. New York City is always where things happen first.

Read the full Forbes article.

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City & State featured President Marvin Krislov in "The 2020 Higher Education Power 50"

09/14/2020

City & State featured President Marvin Krislov in "The 2020 Higher Education Power 50"

40. Marvin Krislov

President, Pace University

Marvin Krislov came to Pace University in 2018 after serving for a decade as president of Oberlin College. Over the past few years, he has been working on a $190 million plan to upgrade and expand Pace’s Manhattan campus, while ensuring that the 13,000-student university retains its place as a top four-year school for social mobility. Krislov previously served as acting solicitor of national operations in the U.S. Department of Labor.

Read the full City & State article.

 

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The Ed UP Experience Podcast featured President Marvin Krislov in "Higher Education De-densifying and Intrusive Advising - w/Marvin Krislov, President, Pace University"

09/09/2020

The Ed UP Experience Podcast featured President Marvin Krislov in "Higher Education De-densifying and Intrusive Advising - w/Marvin Krislov, President, Pace University"

This is The EdUp Experience President Series, Episode #15 - Our guest on this episode is Marvin Krislov, President of Pace University.  Students have recently returned to Pace University - Marvin talks to us about the "Intrusive Advising" process Pace has created to stay in contact with students.  He also discusses the financial burden that comes with de-densyfying classrooms and preparing for student returns during CV19.  With new ways of interacting becoming normal, taking care of first-gen students is a priority for Pace - along with Marvin's challenge to higher education:  Come up with a new term for "office hours"! 

Marvin Krislov became the eighth President of Pace University on August 1, 2017. He is deeply committed to Pace’s mission of Opportunitas—providing all students, regardless of economic background, access to the transformative power of education. He is guiding Pace through its New York City Master Plan to overhaul our downtown campus, and he’s working to bolster Pace’s status as the nation’s leading four-year private college for driving economic mobility. 

Listen to the The Ed UP Experience Podcast.

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Forbes featured Pace President Marvin Krislov's latest piece: "To The Class Of 2024: You’re Going To Change The World"

08/21/2020

Forbes featured Pace President Marvin Krislov's latest piece: "To The Class Of 2024: You’re Going To Change The World"

Any day now, members of the Class of 2024 will start arriving on many of America’s college campuses.

It won’t be like move-in days of years past. At a time of social distance and reduced density, of Zoom lectures and FaceTime study groups, there won’t be phalanxes of resident assistants and volunteers shouting greetings and giving high-fives; in many cases, it may not even be possible for parents to drive up, unload the car, and give their student a big farewell hug. Health and safety will require staggered move-ins, limits on visitors, and carefully choreographed unpacking.

And, in some ways, that’s a good thing. It will set the tone for how this year will go, whether on campus or via remote learning. This year will be something different, something special, something embraced by a group of brave and dedicated students. This year will give the Class of 2024 a college experience unlike any other.

These students are embarking on their college careers at an unsettled time for the country. It is a challenging moment, to be sure. But it’s also extraordinary: This is a college class that is living through history. That experience will bind the Class of 2024 together, and it will set these students up for remarkable, meaningful, productive lives. They’re jumping forward into a transforming world, and they will be ready to lead it.

These last five months have been tumultuous. For the foreseeable future, the only constant will remain profound change. Over the next four years, there will be new opportunities in health, the sciences, and government. There will be new outlooks on racial equality, social justice, immigration, and the economy. There will be new technologies, new ways of working, new ways of living. And the remarkable Class of 2024 will be ready for all of it.

When I think about all the many and changing opportunities ahead of these students, and when I think about how committed and resilient they are, I’m every bit as excited as I am at the start of each academic year, if not more so.

Read the full Forbes article.

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