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Stimson featured Dyson Professor Matthew Bolton in "U.S. Congress and the Legacies of the Vietnam War Era'

01/13/2021

Stimson featured Dyson Professor Matthew Bolton in "U.S. Congress and the Legacies of the Vietnam War Era'

Join us for a discussion with Representative Jackie Speier, Time Rieser, Dr. Matthew Breay Bolton, and Craig Hart about the Unexploded Ordnance (UXO)/Demining Caucus and the role of the U.S. Congress in leading on war legacy issues globally and in Southeast Asia. Dr. Bolton is an associate professor of political science at Pace University in New York City. He has participated in the global campaigns on landmines, cluster munitions, killer robots and the arms trade. Since 2014, Bolton has worked on the UN and New York City advocacy of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), recipient of the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize. He is the author of the recently-released book Political Minefields: The Struggle against Automated Killing.

Read the full Stimson article.

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Independent Catholic News featured Dyson Professor Matthew Bolton in "Churches should use their voice on climate change"

02/28/2020

Independent Catholic News featured Dyson Professor Matthew Bolton in "Churches should use their voice on climate change"

The total energy released by US, UK and France nuclear explosions in the Pacific is equivalent to 9,010 Hiroshima bombs, said Prof. Matthew Bolton of the Pace University (USA) and director of Pace's International Disarmament Institute.

Radiation from the nuclear tests affects people unequally, but everyone is affected - there is no "safe level" of the radiation. However, women and girls are more vulnerable to radiation than men, said Bolton.

Nuclear tests should be seen also as intrusion in the sovereignty of Pacific nations - most often high-level secrecy has been surrounding the particular tests. Besides, tests have transnational consequences as fallout from the explosions travels around the world and affects other countries.

Among main suggestions of how churches can help, Bolton suggests increasing support for the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in the Pacific and beyond, highlighting ongoing humanitarian and environmental concerns in the region, and amplifying voices and participation of survivors in nuclear diplomacy at international forums.

Read the full Independent Catholic News article.

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"International Disarmament Institute News" featured Pace University professors Dr. Emily Welty and Dr. Matthew Bolton in "Pace University Professors Deliver Keynote Address on Nuclear Disarmament at Parliament of the World’s Religions, Toronto"

11/08/2018

"International Disarmament Institute News" featured Pace University professors Dr. Emily Welty and Dr. Matthew Bolton in "Pace University Professors Deliver Keynote Address on Nuclear Disarmament at Parliament of the World’s Religions, Toronto"

Dr. Emily Welty and Dr. Matthew Bolton, both professors at Pace University, delivered a joint keynote address about their advocacy with the Nobel Peace Prize-winning International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) at the Parliament of the World’s Religions in Toronto, 6 November.

“We need to live out our faith by openly and rigorously opposing nuclear weapons,” said Welty, director of Peace and Justice Studies at Pace. “Make a public declaration that you and your faith community reject nuclear deterrence as a false ideology that violates what you hold most dear. And then follow that up with action.”

The Parliament of the World’s Religions was created to cultivate harmony among the world’s religious and spiritual communities and foster their engagement with the world and its guiding institutions in order to achieve a just, peaceful and sustainable world. From 1 November to 7 November, thousands of civic, spiritual and grassroots changemakers gathered in Toronto, Canada to reaffirm their commitment to the global interfaith movement and interfaith community.

“From the very beginning of the nuclear age, the harm of nuclear weapons has been indiscriminate and multinational,” said Bolton, director of Pace’s International Disarmament Institute. “But the global extent of nuclear harm means there are opportunities for solidarity across national and religious boundaries. Learning about the suffering of nuclear survivors close to home may enable empathy for those farther away. It creates possibilities for collective action.”

Welty and Bolton are a married couple who teach at Pace and made a conscious decision together to devote their lives to promoting peace and disarmament. Their life’s mission was featured in a video last year when they were nominated for a national Jefferson Award.

Read the article and watch the video.

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"Radio New Zealand" featured director of the International Disarmament Institute at New York's Pace University Matthew Bolton in "Call for more research into effects of Pacific nuclear testing"

10/04/2018

"Radio New Zealand" featured director of the International Disarmament Institute at New York's Pace University Matthew Bolton in "Call for more research into effects of Pacific nuclear testing"

An academic who was part of a Nobel Prize-winning campaign for a treaty against nuclear weapons says more needs to be done to help victims of nuclear weapons testing.

The director of the International Disarmament Institute at New York's Pace University, Matthew Bolton, said the United Nations Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, which was signed by 122 countries last year, required rehabilitation and support for those affected.

None of the nuclear countries - including those who tested in the Pacific - have joined the treaty, and have instead opted to boycott the process through which the treaty was discussed and negotiated.

Dr Bolton recently traveled to Kiritimati Island in Kiribati, where the British tested nuclear weapons in the 1950s. To this day, Britain insists protective measures were taken and that the tests were clean.

But Dr Bolton said there's a lot of evidence that that is not the case, with many stories of people with high rates of cancer and other health and genetic issues, but a lack of data made their case difficult.

"There hasn't been consistent monitoring of radiation levels," he said. "There was some studies in the '70s and '80s but there hasn't been much follow-up."

"To help the people of Kiribati know better the situation they're in. There needs to be proper environmental studies and public health studies and monitoring."

Dr Bolton said that decades on, people there were still dealing with health and psychological effects from the tests - but had received little support.

"It's a scandal, it's a travesty that the deep seated racism of Britain, the US and France imposed the costs of their nuclear programmes on indigenous peoples and people they had colonial control over," he said.

"Now we have a kind of normative framework [the treaty] to deal with this and so all of us need to chip in."

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"Radio New Zealand" featured Dyson Professor Matthew Bolton in "More needs to be done to help those affected by nuclear testing - academic"

05/17/2018

"Radio New Zealand" featured Dyson Professor Matthew Bolton in "More needs to be done to help those affected by nuclear testing - academic"

An academic who was part of a Nobel Prize-winning campaign for a treaty against nuclear weapons says more needs to be done to help those dealing with the lingering effects of nuclear weapons testing.

Matthew Bolton, who is the director of the International Disarmament Institute at New York's Pace University, says the United Nations Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons requires rehabilitation and support for those affected.

The treaty was signed by 122 countries last year, but none of the nuclear countries - including those who tested in the Pacific - have joined the treaty.

Dr Bolton recently traveled to Kiritimati Island, where the British tested nuclear weapons, and says people are dealing with health and psychological effects from the tests - but have received little support.

He told Jamie Tahana that with the countries that dropped the bombs doing nothing, other countries should fill the void.

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