main navigation
my pace

Maya Van Rossu | PACE UNIVERSITY

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Westchester and Fairfield County Business Journal featured Haub Law Professor Katrina Kuh's co-authored op-ed with Haub Law graduate Maya Van Rossu "For businesses, Green Amendment is double green"

04/20/2021

Westchester and Fairfield County Business Journal featured Haub Law Professor Katrina Kuh's co-authored op-ed with Haub Law graduate Maya Van Rossu "For businesses, Green Amendment is double green"

In April 2019 and again in early 2021, the New York State Assembly and the New York State Senate passed legislation to place a constitutional amendment measure, the Green Amendment, on the ballot in November 2021. Voters will be asked whether to amend the New York State Constitution to provide in Section 19, Article I: “Environmental rights. Each person shall have a right to clean air and water, and a healthful environment.”

As occupants of the state, New York businesses will benefit from passage of the amendment. The Green Amendment could benefit businesses by reducing litigation risk, improving the overall resilience and health of communities and fostering conditions that support the development of forward-looking green industries in New York. Additionally, businesses who advocate for adoption of the Green Amendment can, in doing so, communicate their commitment to a sustainable future to their customers, employees and local communities. For businesses, the Green Amendment is double green – good for the environment and good for the bottom line.

The Green Amendment can reduce litigation risk by preventing situations where businesses inadvertently cause or contribute to environmental damages that might later become the basis for an action seeking damages under existing tort, nuisance or other law because existing statutes and regulations are not adequately protective. Consistent with the interpretation of similar constitutional provisions in New York, the Green Amendment would likely not be enforceable directly against private parties; it is instead a limitation on government action.

Read the full Westchester and Fairfield County Business Journal article.