main navigation
my pace

Melanie DuPuis | PACE UNIVERSITY

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Tricorner News featured Dyson chair of Environmental Studies and Science Melanie DuPuis in "Regional dairies haven't had to dump milk-yet"

05/07/2020

Tricorner News featured Dyson chair of Environmental Studies and Science Melanie DuPuis in "Regional dairies haven't had to dump milk-yet"

Melanie DuPuis, chair of Environmental Studies and Science at Pace University and author of “Nature’s Perfect Food: How Milk Became America’s Drink,” said that the dairy processors usually turn as much as a quarter of the milk produced nation-wide into bulk-packaged pizza cheese. 

“Our farming industry simply can’t pivot quickly enough to meet the sudden change in consumer demand.”

Dairy farmers saw a 35% decrease in prices in the space of a few short weeks. 

Read the full Tricorner News article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Snopes featured Dyson Professor Melanie DuPuis co-authored piece "Why Farmers Are Dumping Milk Down the Drain and Letting Produce Rot in Fields"

04/24/2020

Snopes featured Dyson Professor Melanie DuPuis co-authored piece "Why Farmers Are Dumping Milk Down the Drain and Letting Produce Rot in Fields"

Food supply chains have become concentrated, which has made them less nimble in adapting to disruptions like a health pandemic.

This article is republished here with permission from The Conversation. This content is shared here because the topic may interest Snopes readers; it does not, however, represent the work of Snopes fact-checkers or editors.

 

Many Americans may be surprised and confused to see farmers dumping milk down the drain or letting vegetables rot in their fields. 

Why would they be destroying food at a time when grocery stores and food pantriesstruggle to keep pace with surging demand during the coronavirus pandemic?

As sociologists with a specialty in agriculture and food, we study how the structure of the food system affects people’s lives and the environment. Seeing food destroyed at a time when people are going hungry highlights both short- and long-term problems with this system.

A tale of two supply chains

Surprisingly, the supply chain for food bears a striking similarity to that of another product that has experienced shortages: toilet paper

Like the toilet paper market, the food industry has two separate supply chains for consumer and commercial use. On the consumer side are grocery and convenience stores that focus on small purchases. The commercial side represents restaurants and institutions such as schools, prisons, hospitals and corporate cafeterias that purchase large quantities of foods in bulk. Commercial institutions purchase in sizes that exceed the storage capacity of most households and food pantries.

While the commercial and the consumer supply chains are different, they share some commonalities: Both are complex, cover long distances and rely on just-in-time production. Both are also increasingly concentrated, meaning that there are only a few companies between farmers and consumers that process and distribute raw agricultural goods into edible food. For example, on the commercial side, Sysco and U.S. Foods control an estimated 75% of the market for food distribution.

These characteristics make the supply chains more vulnerable to disruptions.

Read the full Snopes article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Telegraph featured Dyson Professor Melanie DuPuis co-authored article "Why farmers are dumping milk down the drain and letting produce rot in fields"

04/24/2020

The Telegraph featured Dyson Professor Melanie DuPuis co-authored article "Why farmers are dumping milk down the drain and letting produce rot in fields"

(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.)

Elizabeth Ransom, Pennsylvania State University; E. Melanie DuPuis, Pace University, and Michelle R. Worosz, Auburn University

(THE CONVERSATION) Many Americans may be surprised and confused to see farmers dumping milk down the drain or letting vegetables rot in their fields.

Why would they be destroying food at a time when grocery stores and food pantries struggle to keep pace with surging demand during the coronavirus pandemic?

As sociologists with a specialty in agriculture and food, we study how the structure of the food system affects people’s lives and the environment. Seeing food destroyed at a time when people are going hungry highlights both short- and long-term problems with this system.

A tale of two supply chains

Surprisingly, the supply chain for food bears a striking similarity to that of another product that has experienced shortages: toilet paper.

Like the toilet paper market, the food industry has two separate supply chains for consumer and commercial use. On the consumer side are grocery and convenience stores that focus on small purchases. The commercial side represents restaurants and institutions such as schools, prisons, hospitals and corporate cafeterias that purchase large quantities of foods in bulk. Ultimately, commercial institutions purchase in sizes that exceed the storage capacity of most households and food pantries.

While the commercial and the consumer supply chains are different, there are some commonalities: Both are complex, cover long distances and rely on just-in-time production. Both are also increasingly concentrated, meaning that there are only a few companies between farmers and consumers that process and distribute raw agricultural goods into edible food. For example, on the commercial side, Sysco and U.S. Foods control an estimated 75% of the market for food distribution.

These characteristics make the supply chains more vulnerable to disruptions.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The City featured Dyson Environmental Studies and Sciences Professor Melanie Dupuis in "AS PLASTIC BAGS GO BYE, A RENEWED PUSH TO RECYCLE FABRICS"

02/25/2020

The City featured Dyson Environmental Studies and Sciences Professor Melanie Dupuis in "AS PLASTIC BAGS GO BYE, A RENEWED PUSH TO RECYCLE FABRICS"

‘No Perfect Material’

Professor Melanie Dupuis, the chair of the Environmental Science department at Pace University said it’s difficult to hard to quantify the potential environmental impact of hundreds of thousands of polyester bags being used for the first time by New Yorkers. Many of the plastics in them deteriorate over time, releasing microfibers that end up in our oceans and fish.

She pointed out that trade-offs like these are very common as industries and cities try to move away from practices that are extremely harmful to the environment, to practices that are less damaging.

“There is no perfect clean material out there that has no environmental impact,” Dupuis said. “In cases like these, it is our job to figure out which has the least environmental impact and move in that direction.”

Read the full The City article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Press Release: Professor and Environmental Leader E. Melanie DuPuis Elected to Pace University Board of Trustees

09/12/2019

Press Release: Professor and Environmental Leader E. Melanie DuPuis Elected to Pace University Board of Trustees

E. Melanie DuPuis, Ph.D., professor and chair of Environmental Studies and Science in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace University, has been appointed to Pace’s Board of Trustees effective immediately. Her first meeting will be in September.

DuPuis is an environmental sociologist who studies politics, governance and social movements around food, environment and sustainability. During her time at Pace DuPuis built a new interdisciplinary bi-campus department with new and existing faculty and staff. She worked with faculty to design new curriculum. Student enrollment has tripled in a four-year period.

She is the author of “Nature’s Perfect Food,” co-author, with David and Michael Goodman, of “Alternative Food Networks” and the editor of “Smoke and Mirrors: The Politics and Culture of Air Pollution.” Her newest book, “Dangerous Digestion,” looks at the history of American dietary advice as a mirror of the political ideas and tensions in American society. She is also the co-editor, with Matthew Garcia and Don Mitchell, of the collection, “Food Across Borders.”

“Melanie’s visionary leadership of Pace's Department of Environmental Studies and Science has led it quickly to prominence and respect,” said Mark Besca, chairman of Pace’s Board of Trustees. “Her experience as a thinker, an educator, a leader, and an academic entrepreneur will bring a strong new perspective to our board.”​

“We are in the middle of an exciting transition,” said DuPuis. “Pace deserves recognition as an educational institution that gives people a well-rounded education as well as access to a great career. I look forward to representing to the Board the perspective of the faculty on both campuses.”

Prior to coming to Pace, DuPuis held academic and administration positions at the University of California, Washington Center, in Washington, D.C. and University of California in Santa Cruz, Calif. DuPuis worked for 10 years with Power Economics as a member of a consulting firm management team that provided economics witnesses in energy and environmental administrative and judicial procedures, including testimony against Enron. She was also an Energy and Environment Policy Analyst for the New York State Department of Economic Development during the 1990s.

DuPuis graduated with honors from Harvard University with a B. A. in Anthropology. She earned her M.A. and her Ph.D. from Cornell University in Development Sociology with a minor in City and Regional Planning.

For a complete list of Pace University’s Board of Trustees, visit the Pace website here.

About Pace University

Pace University has a proud history of preparing its diverse student body for a lifetime of professional success as a result of its unique program that combines rigorous academics and real-world experiences. Pace is ranked the #1 private, four-year college in the nation for upward economic mobility by Harvard University’s Opportunity Insights, evidence of the transformative education the University provides.

From its beginnings as an accounting school in 1906, Pace has grown to three campuses, enrolling 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in more than 150 majors and programs, across a range of disciplines: arts, sciences, business, health care, technology, law, education, and more. The university also has one of the most competitive performing arts programs in the country. Pace has a signature, newly renovated campus in New York City, located in the heart of vibrant Lower Manhattan, next to Wall Street and City Hall, and two campuses in Westchester County, New York: a 200-acre picturesque Pleasantville Campus and a Law School in White Plains. www.pace.edu