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"Men's Health" featured Pace University's College of Health Professions Professor Christen Cupples Cooper in "How to Gain Weight and Build Bigger Muscles"

09/24/2018

"Men's Health" featured Pace University's College of Health Professions Professor Christen Cupples Cooper in "How to Gain Weight and Build Bigger Muscles"

We're always talking about how to lose weight, but there are plenty of guys who want to gain weight in order to increase muscle mass.

“If you want to make more muscle cells, you need to eat more food,” Dr. Jessalynn Adam, sports medicine specialist at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland, tells MensHealth.com.

While eating more food sounds like a dream, it doesn’t mean you can just start gorging on pizza at every meal. Food quality is just as important as quantity, especially if you want to build muscle.

“You need to make sure that you’ll fueling your body so that it can recover,” Adam tells MensHealth.com.

Essentially, resistance training creates micro tears in your muscles, she explains. The muscle repairs itself, and your muscles will become bigger and stronger, but they need the right building blocks, like protein, to do so, she says. And if you decide to bulk up by eating junk, you’ll gain fat along with muscle.

Here are three tips for how to gain weight the right way:

Start slowly

It’s tempting to go overboard, but eating too much too quickly could cause gastrointestinal problems. “Our bodies like certainty and routine,” says Registered Dietitian Christen Cupples Cooper, EdD and Assistant Professor at the College of Health Professions at Pace University. Although side effects vary by person, adding too many calories quickly upsets your normal routine, and may cause an upset stomach, bloating, heartburn, diarrhea or constipation.

She recommends adding 250 calories per day to gain weight.

Read the full article.

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Christen Cupples Cooper, Ed.D., RD, the director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at Pace University’s College of Health Professions is quoted in "Men's Health" about healthful shopping at the best prices

02/12/2018

Christen Cupples Cooper, Ed.D., RD, the director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at Pace University’s College of Health Professions is quoted in "Men's Health" about healthful shopping at the best prices

Men's Health: "I Tried to Eat Vegan for a Week on $57, and It Was a Colossal Failure"

From the Article in Men's Health:

Veganism is slowly becoming mainstream. While we used to consider vegans a fairly small niche, the vegan population is rapidly growing: according to a 2017 consumer report, 6% of Americans self-identify as vegans, as opposed to one percent in 2014. Even some professional athletes are now going vegan.

There are a few reasons why veganism is so buzzy right now: some believe a vegan diet has environmental benefits, while others (perhaps mistakenly) believe it'll help them lose weight. But regardless of the motives, the truth is that going vegan can get tricky. Not getting enough protein is a problem, as is not getting enough B12 or other vitamins. Plus, many have argued that veganism is way too expensive to be a viable dietary option for those at the lower or even middle end of the economic spectrum.

“It takes vigilance and knowledge about healthful shopping in order to obtain the nutrient-dense foods at the best prices,” says Christen Cupples Cooper, Ed.D., RD, the director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at Pace University’s College of Health Professions.

Cooper also notes that veganism is much harder if you live in a food desert, where there isn’t easy access to a supermarket or a large grocery store.“While it’s easy to say that ‘anyone can eat healthfully if they try hard enough,’ many Americans lack access to healthful, fresh foods. Many of these folks end up getting fewer nutrients and more empty calories dollar for dollar," she says.

Although I am a proud carnivore, I wanted to see for myself whether veganism is only a choice available to the privileged, or if it was possible to do so on a limited budget. That's why I tried to go vegan for a week on a little over $50.

Read the full article.