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NBC featured Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Kimberly Collica-Cox in "Prison Dog Training Programs Rehabilitate Canines and Cons"

06/18/2020

NBC featured Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Kimberly Collica-Cox in "Prison Dog Training Programs Rehabilitate Canines and Cons"

Kimberly Collica-Cox, associate professor of criminal justice at Pace University in New York, has studied how the symbiotic relationship between humans and dogs can be useful in prisons. Collica-Cox helped develop a program through Pace that uses animal assisted therapy to teach incarcerated mothers better parenting skills.

“What we find is that dogs can trigger feelings of safety in humans, which will allow them to sort of open up and communicate more, which can be very helpful in a correctional setting,” she said, adding that there’s a great deal of research to support these findings.

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NBC featured Dyson Professor Kelley Kreitz in "Today in New York"

03/12/2020

NBC featured Dyson Professor Kelley Kreitz in "Today in New York"

Cutting the classroom experience. How are students and teachers reacting to remote learning? We drop in on a class at Pace University.

Watch the NBC news clip begining at 4:43:38.

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"NBC" featured Dyson assistant professor of communication studies Aditi Paul in "Los Angeles Ranks Top 10 in List of "Best Cities for Singles""

11/25/2019

"NBC" featured Dyson assistant professor of communication studies Aditi Paul in "Los Angeles Ranks Top 10 in List of "Best Cities for Singles""

"First, when two strangers who have met on an app are trying to get to know one another, just having a conversation can put a lot of stress on the acquaintanceship process. Therefore, centering the date around a social activity can act as a buffer and alleviates the stress on both parties," said Aditi Paul, assistant professor of communication studies at Pace University in the study. "Second, if you are choosing a city that has a handful of bars and you frequent the same bars with different dates, things might get a little awkward."

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"NBC Washington" featured Lubin student Sasha Alston and her children’s book, Sasha Savvy Loves to Code, in "Young DC Author Inspires Girls to Pursue STEM"

06/14/2019

"NBC Washington" featured Lubin student Sasha Alston and her children’s book, Sasha Savvy Loves to Code, in "Young DC Author Inspires Girls to Pursue STEM"

A younger author from the District is going global with her book — "Sasha Savvy Loves to Code" — which she hopes inspires young girls and people of color to get involved with STEM.

Watch the NBC Washington news clip.

Read more about Sasha.

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"NBC Connecticut" featured Karl Rabago, the executive director of the Pace University Law School Energy and Climate Center in "Activists Push Back Against Utilities to Brighten Solar Energy's Prospects"

05/29/2019

"NBC Connecticut" featured Karl Rabago, the executive director of the Pace University Law School Energy and Climate Center in "Activists Push Back Against Utilities to Brighten Solar Energy's Prospects"

A New Utility Model
Across the world, solar and wind power are growing rapidly and are expected to become the dominant source of electricity, according to a report released last November by the International Energy Agency. The annual “World Energy Outlook” found that renewable energy could supply 40% of the world’s electricity by 2040, as the electricity sector goes through the most dramatic transformation since its creation more than a century ago. It will require grid investments, improved smart meters and battery storage technologies and new rules for how electricity markets work.

The traditional utility business model needs to be replaced by one that encourages more distributed generation such as that produced by rooftop solar, promotes less energy use and takes into account the costs of climate change, said Karl Rabago, the executive director of the Pace University Law School Energy and Climate Center in White Plains, New York. Utility companies could continue to maintain the wires and grid stability, but customers who are producing solar energy and using energy efficiently are just as effective in meeting demand and at a lower cost, he said.

“We have to confront the question of the fundamental utility architecture,” Rabago said. “Is it capable of embracing this stuff? And what we find is that it’s not very adept at doing that.”

In Connecticut, Pelton of EcoSmart Home Services says it will become harder to sell solar panels if net metering is discontinued. Federal income tax credits are already scheduled to drop and then expire over the next three years and adding solar energy systems will become less attractive to homeowners, he said.

"All of sudden that conversation at the kitchen table doesn't go so well," he said. "We would like to have a little stability."

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"NBC" featured Law School graduate Jeffrey Deskovic in "Wrongly Convicted Man Graduates From Law School"

05/14/2019

"NBC" featured Law School graduate Jeffrey Deskovic in "Wrongly Convicted Man Graduates From Law School"

A man who spent 16 years in prison for a crime he didn't commit has just graduated from law school. Jamie Roth reports.

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"NBC 2" featured Pace University's Lubin School of Business professor Larry Chiagouris in "Prada asks Ava DuVernay and Theater Gates to lead diversity effort"

02/15/2019

"NBC 2" featured Pace University's Lubin School of Business professor Larry Chiagouris in "Prada asks Ava DuVernay and Theater Gates to lead diversity effort"

Prada has tapped "Selma" director Ava DuVernay and artist Theaster Gates to advise the Italian fashion house on diversity issues after the company released a holiday collection featuring blackface imagery.

In December, Prada faced backlash over its Pradamalia line, which included monkey-like figurines with black faces and large red lips. When civil rights attorney Chinyere Ezie spotted the products at a Prada store in Manhattan, she posted on Facebook that she was struck by how the items resembled blackface. The figurines left her "shaking with anger," she wrote at the time.

After that post gained traction, Prada pulled the products and issued a statement, saying "we abhor all forms of racism and racist imagery."

Now, Prada's announcement about its diversity council comes amid more controversies in the broader fashion industry. Earlier this week, pop star Katy Perry's namesake brand faced backlash for two shoe designs that resembled blackface, and last week, Gucci apologized for a black sweater that featured large red lips.

Prada said its advisory council, led by DuVernay and Gates, will work to "ensure that the fashion world is reflective of the world in which we live," in addition to instructing the brand on hiring and creating opportunities for students of color.

Top designers in the fashion industry are predominantly white: Among the 495 members of the Council of Fashion Designers of America, only 17 identify as black.

Prada is not the only fashion house seeking help with its image. After Gucci's sweater controversy, the company met with fashion designer Dapper Dan, who, in an Instagram post, had demanded accountability.

Prada and Gucci's recent missteps are a symptom of the growing disconnect between designers and consumers, branding consultant Kate Newlin told CNN. She also believes that the star status of top designers creates a culture within the brands where others are unable to question their ideas.

Ultimately, the impact of Prada's diversity council will also depend on other details that the fashion house has yet to announce, including who else will join DuVernay and Gates and how long the council will meet, Pace University marketing professor Larry Chiagouris told CNN.

"They need to make sure that there is a greater level of sensitivity and awareness of what impact their products have on people's perceptions of each other and social issues," Chiagouris said. "That is going to require a lot of awareness raising and a little bit more oversight by the business people, who are in contact with the customers themselves."

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