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NBC News featured Pace graduate Bonita Rodriguez in "How this Marine found her voice, confidence to pursue the career she loves"

09/30/2020

NBC News featured Pace graduate Bonita Rodriguez in "How this Marine found her voice, confidence to pursue the career she loves"

After her enlistment, inspired by her Master Gunnery Sergeant, Rodriguez ended up at Pace University in New York City, originally studying psychology, but she linked up with other student veterans who told her about the many job opportunities in information technology. She graduated with her degree in 2019 and now works as a Media Tech Associate at NBC Universal on a rotation program, a role she said she loves.

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NBC News featured Pace University President Marvin Krislov in "James Lipton, host of 'Inside the Actors Studio,' dies at 93"

03/03/2020

NBC News featured Pace University President Marvin Krislov in "James Lipton, host of 'Inside the Actors Studio,' dies at 93"

The Actors Studio moved from New School to Pace University in 2006, where Lipton served as dean emeritus.

"It’s very gratifying to see the legacy of Inside the Actors Studio being carried forward for a new generation to appreciate and enjoy," Lipton said at the time. "I made a vow early on that we would not deal in gossip — only in craft, and Ovation, as a network dedicated to the arts, will continue that tradition with the next seasons of the series."

Ovation announced his death in a statement Monday, calling Lipton a "multi-hyphenate actor-iconoclast."

"Lipton will be remembered for his passion, dogged spirit, and indelible contribution to the world of performing arts," the network said.

President of NBCU Lifestyle Networks Frances Berwick called Lipton a "titan of the film and entertainment industry" in a statement.

"I had the pleasure of working with Jim for 20 years on Bravo's first original series, his pride and joy ‘Inside the Actors Studio,'" Berwick said. "We all enjoyed and respected his fierce passion, contributions to the craft, comprehensive research and his ability to bring the most intimate interviews ever conducted with A-list actors across generations."

Bravo is owned by NBCUniversal, the parent company of NBC News.

Pace University President Marvin Krislov said that Lipton's legacy will live on in the generations of actors he inspired.

“James Lipton was a great writer and actor, a great interviewer, and, most important, a great teacher," Krislov said in a statement. "He was a revered leader of the Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University, and we are all deeply saddened by this loss."

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"NBC News" featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law distinguished fellow in criminal justice Mimi Rocah's piece "Trump's smearing of ex-Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch echoes Christine Blasey Ford"

11/19/2019

"NBC News" featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law distinguished fellow in criminal justice Mimi Rocah's piece "Trump's smearing of ex-Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch echoes Christine Blasey Ford"

Like many Americans, we expected the testimony of the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, Marie Yovanovitch, to be powerful. We did not expect it to prove so emotional, or to feel so familiar.

When the impeachment inquiry hearing began last Friday, Yovanovitch, a 33-year State Department veteran with a calming voice, opened with an emphasis on service and patriotism similar to the statements given by George Kent and William Taylor, her male counterparts in career foreign service who had testified earlier in the week.

For much of the morning, her testimony harkened strongly back to the testimony of former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates, who testified in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee in 2017. Yates told lawmakers about how former national security adviser Michael Flynn had lied to investigators about his Russian contacts, raising alarms about national security in the Trump administration. Yovanovitch, too, spoke of red flags tied to a gutted State Department and an eroding foreign policy.

But by midmorning, things took a turn. Democratic counsel Daniel Goldman asked her about how she felt after learning President Donald Trump had discussed her with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy during the now infamous July 25 phone call. It was a chilling moment. Referring to Yovanovitch as “the woman,” Trump told his Ukrainian counterpart she was “going to go through some things.”

“It was a terrible moment,” Yovanovitch recalled Friday. She said “that the color drained from my face. I think I even had a physical reaction,” when that portion of the call was read to her. It sounded, she said, “like a threat.”

In that moment, Yovanovitch became not only a witness to the corruption of Ukrainian-American policy but also a victim of that corruption — “the former ambassador” but also “the woman.” Clearly, she was being targeted by a smear campaign orchestrated by Rudy Giuliani and his henchmen, a campaign adopted and amplified by the president of the United States.

Those watching the hearing could not help but be struck by the imbalances of power at play. It’s a power dynamic that we’ve seen before however, notably during the testimony of Christine Blasey Ford.

Ford’s account of the sexual assault she alleged was perpetrated by then Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh may have occurred a year ago, but it has yet to recede from the national psyche. Indeed, the night before Yovanovitch’s testimony, Ford’s testimony had been broadcast on a large screen just a few blocks from the Capitol, outside the hall where Kavanaugh gave is his first major public speech since ascending to the court.

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"NBC News" featured Dyson history professor Joseph Tse-Hei Lee in "Pro-Hong Kong demonstrations in U.S. met with China-supporting counterprotesters"

09/05/2019

"NBC News" featured Dyson history professor Joseph Tse-Hei Lee in "Pro-Hong Kong demonstrations in U.S. met with China-supporting counterprotesters"

...“Right now, China is still the second-largest economy in the world, and I think it is also positioning itself as a major international power,” Joseph Tse-Hei Lee, a history professor at Pace University in New York, said.

“So when you look at the timing, I think there is a sense of urgency at least to control the narrative about China, the discourse about China, not just within the country but also overseas as well,” he added.

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"NBC News" featured Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow Mimi Rocah's piece "Pipe-bomber Cesar Sayoc's lawyers named Trump in their defense. They won't be the only ones."

08/08/2019

"NBC News" featured Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow Mimi Rocah's piece "Pipe-bomber Cesar Sayoc's lawyers named Trump in their defense. They won't be the only ones."

Mimi Rocah, currently a Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow at Pace University Elisabeth Haub School Law, served as an assistant U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York from 2001 to 2017. Rocah is an NBC and MSNBC legal analyst.

By Mimi Rocah, former assistant U.S. attorney and NBC/MSNBC legal analyst

As our country debates how President Donald Trump’s rhetoric incites racism and violence, one place his words and conspiracy theories unquestionably have had a parallel impact is in criminal courtrooms.

Already, defendants have begun raising objections to cases that include witnesses who have cooperated with federal authorities (which happens in the majority of federal criminal cases, from gang violence to fraud) because Trump has repeatedly used the biggest megaphone in the country to say that “flippers” (as he calls them) should be illegal. Now, we are seeing the emergence of the “Trump made me do it” defense in criminal cases — or at least the “Trump influenced me” mitigation.

Take, for example, Cesar Sayoc, who for two weeks terrorized the public by sending almost daily pipe bombs to public officials and private citizens alike based on their political affiliations. Sayoc was caught in 2018 living in a van covered in dozens of Trump pictures and decals attacking the media. In March of 2019 he pleaded guilty to 65 counts, including using weapons of mass destruction and the illegal mailing of explosives with intent to kill or injure.

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Sayoc could have been sentenced to life imprisonment — the recommended sentence under the federal sentencing guidelines — but his lawyers cited Trump’s words and arguments in their attempt to secure a lighter sentence. They argued that their client was a cognitively limited, sexual abuse survivor who thought of Trump as a “surrogate father” and came to believe in an “alternative reality” fueled in part by the president’s attacks on his political opponents. Sayoc, his attorneys wrote in a sentencing memo filed in federal court in New York on Monday, was a Trump “super fan” and “began to consider Democrats as not just dangerous in theory, but imminently and seriously dangerous to his personal safety.”

Ultimately, Judge Jed S. Rakoff sentenced Sayoc to 20 years in prison, a technically lighter sentence than what prosecutors asked for although practically speaking, it could mean life in prison for the 57-year-old defendant.This sentence was based largely on the judge’s acceptance of Sayoc’s argument that he did not intend for the bombs to detonate and hurt anyone, contrary to prosecutors' arguments. However, the judge did note that Sayoc’s troubled life, including his infatuation with Trump and his view of the president’s political enemies as demons, played a role. Rakoff was clear that Sayoc was not “insane in the technical legal sense of that word… [but] he clearly became obsessive and paranoiac, and it was in this state, made still worse by his steroid abuse, that he decided to commit the crimes for which he is now to be sentenced.”

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"NBC News" featured Pace Law School professor Randolph McLaughlin in "Decision not to charge NYPD officer in Eric Garner case exposes DOJ divide"

07/18/2019

"NBC News" featured Pace Law School professor Randolph McLaughlin in "Decision not to charge NYPD officer in Eric Garner case exposes DOJ divide"

...Randolph McLaughlin, a civil rights lawyer and Pace Law School professor, said he found it "highly unusual" that Donoghue and Barr would come to a different conclusion than the Civil Rights Division.

But, he added, the Trump administration has made it clear that it won't hold police departments accountable for civil rights violations as vigorously as Obama's Justice Department had.

"This administration has put its thumb on the scale for police departments across the country," McLaughlin said. "Where there's a chance that a police officer acted inappropriately, this Justice Department has turned a blind eye in their favor."

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