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NBC News featured Haub Law Professor Randolph McLaughlin in "How the 1871 Ku Klux Klan Act is being used in this latest Trump lawsuit"

02/18/2021

NBC News featured Haub Law Professor Randolph McLaughlin in "How the 1871 Ku Klux Klan Act is being used in this latest Trump lawsuit"

“This statute was intended to give African Americans and those who supported the freedom efforts a federal cause of action, a right to a lawsuit for the deprivation of rights protected by the statute," said McLaughlin, now a professor at Pace University School of Law and co-chair of Newman Ferrara, a New York-based litigation firm. "I do believe that this statute is perfectly fitted to deal with the problems that were exhibited on Jan. 6, and before Jan. 6, and will be inflicted on the community after Jan. 6. I’m thrilled that my colleagues at the NAACP have taken this up, because if we don’t do something this will happen again or worse. I think this is a wonderful, wonderful opportunity for lawyers to be creative, get some justice, and shut down neo-fascism.”

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NBC News featured Chief Diversity Officer Tiffany Hamilton in "Meet 7 former Grow Your Value contestants who are surviving and thriving amid Covid-19"

11/11/2020

NBC News featured Chief Diversity Officer Tiffany Hamilton in "Meet 7 former Grow Your Value contestants who are surviving and thriving amid Covid-19"

Tiffany Hamilton works in the diversity and inclusion industry as a business owner, coach and as chief diversity officer at Pace University.

Like many industries, diversity and inclusion went virtual during Covid-19. Hamilton said it was initially challenging for the business, which is dependent on human connection.

“Many of the clients miss the presence of community. It pushes me to leverage engagement opportunities and keep attention all under 55 minutes,” said Hamilton, who won the New York Grow Your Value contest in 2017. “…It’s been difficult. We have to manage the expectation of being present against the very real emotions of employees.”

On the positive side, Hamilton said she witnessed a cultural and mental shift during Covid-19 that has made people more receptive to diversity and inclusion conversations. She expanded her virtual offerings in order to meet the moment.

“What Covid-19 has done is a beautiful job of doing is neutralizing the distractions and forcing us all to see more of the world around us,” said Hamilton. “We have taken advantage of the captive audiences…Ultimately, we are benefiting from virtual space.”

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NBC News featured Pace graduate Bonita Rodriguez in "How this Marine found her voice, confidence to pursue the career she loves"

09/30/2020

NBC News featured Pace graduate Bonita Rodriguez in "How this Marine found her voice, confidence to pursue the career she loves"

After her enlistment, inspired by her Master Gunnery Sergeant, Rodriguez ended up at Pace University in New York City, originally studying psychology, but she linked up with other student veterans who told her about the many job opportunities in information technology. She graduated with her degree in 2019 and now works as a Media Tech Associate at NBC Universal on a rotation program, a role she said she loves.

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NBC News featured Pace University President Marvin Krislov in "James Lipton, host of 'Inside the Actors Studio,' dies at 93"

03/03/2020

NBC News featured Pace University President Marvin Krislov in "James Lipton, host of 'Inside the Actors Studio,' dies at 93"

The Actors Studio moved from New School to Pace University in 2006, where Lipton served as dean emeritus.

"It’s very gratifying to see the legacy of Inside the Actors Studio being carried forward for a new generation to appreciate and enjoy," Lipton said at the time. "I made a vow early on that we would not deal in gossip — only in craft, and Ovation, as a network dedicated to the arts, will continue that tradition with the next seasons of the series."

Ovation announced his death in a statement Monday, calling Lipton a "multi-hyphenate actor-iconoclast."

"Lipton will be remembered for his passion, dogged spirit, and indelible contribution to the world of performing arts," the network said.

President of NBCU Lifestyle Networks Frances Berwick called Lipton a "titan of the film and entertainment industry" in a statement.

"I had the pleasure of working with Jim for 20 years on Bravo's first original series, his pride and joy ‘Inside the Actors Studio,'" Berwick said. "We all enjoyed and respected his fierce passion, contributions to the craft, comprehensive research and his ability to bring the most intimate interviews ever conducted with A-list actors across generations."

Bravo is owned by NBCUniversal, the parent company of NBC News.

Pace University President Marvin Krislov said that Lipton's legacy will live on in the generations of actors he inspired.

“James Lipton was a great writer and actor, a great interviewer, and, most important, a great teacher," Krislov said in a statement. "He was a revered leader of the Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University, and we are all deeply saddened by this loss."

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"NBC News" featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law distinguished fellow in criminal justice Mimi Rocah's piece "Trump's smearing of ex-Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch echoes Christine Blasey Ford"

11/19/2019

"NBC News" featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law distinguished fellow in criminal justice Mimi Rocah's piece "Trump's smearing of ex-Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch echoes Christine Blasey Ford"

Like many Americans, we expected the testimony of the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, Marie Yovanovitch, to be powerful. We did not expect it to prove so emotional, or to feel so familiar.

When the impeachment inquiry hearing began last Friday, Yovanovitch, a 33-year State Department veteran with a calming voice, opened with an emphasis on service and patriotism similar to the statements given by George Kent and William Taylor, her male counterparts in career foreign service who had testified earlier in the week.

For much of the morning, her testimony harkened strongly back to the testimony of former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates, who testified in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee in 2017. Yates told lawmakers about how former national security adviser Michael Flynn had lied to investigators about his Russian contacts, raising alarms about national security in the Trump administration. Yovanovitch, too, spoke of red flags tied to a gutted State Department and an eroding foreign policy.

But by midmorning, things took a turn. Democratic counsel Daniel Goldman asked her about how she felt after learning President Donald Trump had discussed her with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy during the now infamous July 25 phone call. It was a chilling moment. Referring to Yovanovitch as “the woman,” Trump told his Ukrainian counterpart she was “going to go through some things.”

“It was a terrible moment,” Yovanovitch recalled Friday. She said “that the color drained from my face. I think I even had a physical reaction,” when that portion of the call was read to her. It sounded, she said, “like a threat.”

In that moment, Yovanovitch became not only a witness to the corruption of Ukrainian-American policy but also a victim of that corruption — “the former ambassador” but also “the woman.” Clearly, she was being targeted by a smear campaign orchestrated by Rudy Giuliani and his henchmen, a campaign adopted and amplified by the president of the United States.

Those watching the hearing could not help but be struck by the imbalances of power at play. It’s a power dynamic that we’ve seen before however, notably during the testimony of Christine Blasey Ford.

Ford’s account of the sexual assault she alleged was perpetrated by then Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh may have occurred a year ago, but it has yet to recede from the national psyche. Indeed, the night before Yovanovitch’s testimony, Ford’s testimony had been broadcast on a large screen just a few blocks from the Capitol, outside the hall where Kavanaugh gave is his first major public speech since ascending to the court.

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