main navigation
my pace

The New York Law Journal | PACE UNIVERSITY

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The New York Law Journal featured Haub Law Professor Katrina Kuh's op-ed "Why Do We Need the Green Amendment?"

03/16/2021

The New York Law Journal featured Haub Law Professor Katrina Kuh's op-ed "Why Do We Need the Green Amendment?"

This fall, New Yorkers will be asked to vote on whether the New York State Constitution should be amended to recognize a “a right to clean air and water, and a healthful environment.” I suspect that, for many, this will cause a bit of head scratching. You mean we don’t already have a right clean air and water?

No, New Yorkers do not presently have a right to clean air and water. There are many laws aimed at protecting human health and the environment, including laws designed to ensure that our drinking water is safe to drink and that our air is safe to breathe. But, as any resident of Hoosick Falls can tell you, if, for some reason, those laws don’t apply or aren’t being implemented effectively, citizens may have little recourse.

In the case of Hoosick Falls, a citizen concerned about an unusual number of family and neighbors getting cancer paid to have his drinking water tested, which revealed high levels of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a suspected carcinogen. Upon reporting the high levels of PFOA in the water to the relevant regulators, the Village of Hoosick Falls was assured by the Rensselaer County Department of Health and New York State Department of Health that Hoosick Falls’ drinking water met all relevant standards and was safe to drink, going so far as to advise the Village that it was not necessary to collect more water samples. But here’s the catch about PFOAS as well as many other so-called emerging contaminants, like 1, 4 dioxane (also regularly found in drinking water in New York). The laws designed to keep our drinking water safe only limit chemicals in drinking water for which drinking water standards have been established. If a standard hasn’t been set (a process that can take decades), the chemical can lawfully remain in our drinking water. And, although serious concerns have been raised for decades about health risks from exposure to PFOA and similar chemicals, no national drinking water standard for it has yet been developed (although New York set its own standard of 10 parts per trillion in August 2020).

Read the full New York Law Journal.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The New York Law Journal featured Haub Law Assistant Dean Jill Backer's piece "Will the Pandemic Put the Final Nail in the Coffin of On-Campus Interviewing?"

02/25/2021

The New York Law Journal featured Haub Law Assistant Dean Jill Backer's piece "Will the Pandemic Put the Final Nail in the Coffin of On-Campus Interviewing?"

Assistant Dean Jill Backer writes about on-campus recruiting in the pandemic in the New York Law Journal: Will the Pandemic Put the Final Nail in the Coffin of On-Campus Interviewing? Traditionally the Am Law 100 and 200 law firms would all arrive on the doorsteps of law schools each summer to interview their best and brightest to be summer associates for the following summer. Success during these 20-minute screener interviews on campus meant a full callback interview at the firm. The callback interviews usually consisted of two partners and two associates in succession and then a meal or something more social—totaling anywhere from two to six hours. The end result of this process was a golden ticket to join an Am Law firm.

Traditionally the Am Law 100 and 200 law firms would all arrive on the doorsteps of law schools each summer to interview their best and brightest to be summer associates for the following summer. Success during these 20-minute screener interviews on campus meant a full callback interview at the firm. The callback interviews usually consisted of two partners and two associates in succession and then a meal or something more social—totaling anywhere from two to six hours. The end result of this process was a golden ticket to join an Am Law firm. However, the process was onerous for both interviewer and interviewee alike.

Read the full  New York Law Journal article.