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New York Post featured Pace University’s recovery internship program in "College students are turning to nonprofits for valuable intern opportunities"

03/01/2021

New York Post featured Pace University’s recovery internship program in "College students are turning to nonprofits for valuable intern opportunities"

When her teaching assistant internship got scrapped overnight last summer, Pace University student Vicky Trieu, 22, of Secaucus, NJ, didn’t miss a beat.

The child education major landed a replacement opportunity through a new Pace initiative, New York Recovery Internships, which pairs students with local nonprofit organizations. Trieu joined up with the Urban League, a civil rights and urban advocacy organization, for 28 hours each week.

“This came at a time that I unexpectedly needed it the most,” said Trieu, who worked on education research. Although it was not a teaching role, she said it “ultimately enabled me to grow as a future educator.”

Last year, Pace placed 65 of its students with 24 nonprofits, paying interns $15 an hour raised by the school.

Phyllis Mooney, executive director of career services at Pace, said, “This program is a highlight of my career. It’s growing two trees with one seed. Such a fantastic opportunity for the students and for the nonprofits who were impacted by COVID-19.”

In addition to gaining skills and helping nonprofits that typically rely on in-person events for fund-raising, interns got a glimpse into nonprofit careers. “Students think nonprofit means no money,” said Mooney. “Look at these nonprofits! Don’t eliminate nonprofits from your thinking. There is a future, this is great work, and it pays.”

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New York Post featured Haub Law Professor Bennett Gershman in "Brooklyn judge uses forgotten state law to bypass bail reform"

02/18/2020

New York Post featured Haub Law Professor Bennett Gershman in "Brooklyn judge uses forgotten state law to bypass bail reform"

Bennett Gershman, a former Manhattan prosecutor and now a professor at Pace University School of Law, said the Brooklyn judge did the “right thing.”

“The judge rescued a very bad situation using this statute,” said Gershman, who added that state legislators overreached on the reform measure, exposing the system to “embarrassing” lapses.

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"New York Post" featured Pace University in "Pace University course helps veterans transition to college"

11/11/2019

"New York Post" featured Pace University in "Pace University course helps veterans transition to college"

When Marcus Mannino of Gravesend, Brooklyn, recalls his first semester at Pace University’s downtown campus, he remembers feeling somewhat overwhelmed.

Mannino, currently pursuing a graduate degree in human resources management while also serving in the Navy Reserves, saw active duty from 2012 to 2016 as an operations specialist, so not only did he have to adjust to being a new New Yorker, healso had to adapt to civilian life as a student.

“One of the biggest challenges was being brand-new to NYC and the fast-paced lifestyle,” he says. “[Coming] from Texas, it was a lot different. Add on that being military, I had no idea how best to assimilate back into civilian life.”

Though Mannino knew about campus career services, he signed up for University 101 for Veterans, a weekly 90-minute elective course offered every fall to help first-year student veterans adjust.

“It gave me a place to call home,” he says.

Mannino learned about resources available on campus such as career services, but says this one-credit class was invaluable for building camaraderie. Friendships developed outside the classroom, which involved weekly meetings with his peer leader, another student veteran who serves as a mentor.

“It gave me a person to go grab a beer with after class and chill, to really relax and comprehend everything that Pace has to offer,” says Mannino. “It let me make friends that were in similar situations and adapt to the brand-new lifestyle.”

Marine Corps veteran Girard Vercillo of Crown Heights served from October 2011 through 2016 as an aviation information systems specialist. He bonded with classmates in the course by sharing stories of military life and hanging out at the nearby Beekman Hotel after class. Two years later, they still meet up regularly and text in group chats.

Aiming to graduate next month with a master’s degree in information systems, he recently landed a job as a cloud infrastructure analyst at professional services company Accenture in Midtown. He found the gig after hearing a career services representative speak in class about elevator pitches and resume writing, which prompted Vercillo to visit Accenture’s office to polish his resume.

“I would not have gone to career services without the UNV 101,” says Vercillo. “I learned how to translate my experiences from the military and phrase them in a way that is relatable and understandable to companies and HR departments. I interviewed with Accenture at a Student Veterans of America national convention which I learned of from the UNV 101 class.”

This is exactly what Vanessa J. Herman, assistant vice president for government and community relations at Pace, hoped to accomplish when she was tasked with creating this veteran track two years ago. While every Pace freshman is required to take a pass/fail first-year experience to assimilate into college life, this course is specifically designed for veterans. Presentations include information about available resources on campus such as the counseling center, and stress management for this unique demographic who, compared with traditional freshmen, may be slightly older, married and perhaps with children.

“In addition to general assimilation to college life, career readiness is something all student veterans talk about, transitioning the skills they did in the military into civilian life,” says Herman. “It can be very challenging.”

Married to a 30-year veteran, Herman is familiar with their challenges. “I can read a military resume; not a lot of people can,” she says. “If you were a noncommissioned officer, that’s management experience. So you managed a motor pool, you were a supervisor and you have leadership skills and here’s how you would talk about that. We help them realize this exceptional experience is transferable to just about any field they’re interested in.”

Peter Riley, director of veteran services at Pace, says that “the key is translate.” Riley is a retired New York Army National Guard colonel with 30 years of service, including duty in the Iraq war and most recently as commander of Joint Task Force Empire Shield, a military arm that protects New York City.

“I always tell them, ‘No jargon, even within the different services,’ ” he says. “The Army has their own jargon, the Marine Corps has their own jargon. [Say] ‘I was a medic,’ not ‘I was a 68 series.’ Nobody else knows that — translate it into civilian language.”

Then, there’s the modesty.

“We work on their elevator pitch,” says Riley. “In the military, you’re taught to be humble, to a degree. Capitalize on the unique experience that you had in the military — it’s not bragging to say what you did. You absolutely want to put it down there and be comfortable about talking about the things that you’ve done. We want our students to succeed with laser-focused assistance.”

Riley sees that as the Pace class mission: “To support them so they have the skills, knowledge and confidence to succeed in the civilian world and their personal life again.”

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"New York Post" featured Dyson student, Bre Taylor, showing off her view from 33 Beekman in "These college kids enjoy million-dollar views from their NYC dorms"

09/19/2019

"New York Post" featured Dyson student, Bre Taylor, showing off her view from 33 Beekman in "These college kids enjoy million-dollar views from their NYC dorms"

Pace University’s upperclassman dorm at 33 Beekman St. doesn’t even make a dent in the Financial District skyline when compared with its neighboring tall towers — but the 34-story dorm is the tallest student residential building in the country. And it comes with the coveted views to prove it.

Senior and resident assistant Bre Taylor lives in a single on the building’s 33rd floor that overlooks the South Street Seaport, the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges, and the built-up Brooklyn waterfront. “I’m very lucky. I don’t know if I’ll ever be this lucky again,” says Taylor, a 21-year-old communications major from Virginia. She’s spent hours watching traffic crawl over the bridges into King’s County, and once saw a marquee emblazoned with a marriage proposal float by on the East River.

The 760 students who live in the building pay between $8,850 and $10,500 per semester, depending on room size, though most students live in doubles that run $9,380 per semester. When it comes to which story the students get to inhabit, those with seniority and higher grade point averages get to pick their rooms first.

“I think it’s really funny that people pay millions of dollars to live over here,” Taylor says of the Financial District, where she has resided since freshman year because it’s home to Pace’s campus. After graduation, when she hunts for her own apartment, Taylor says she’ll prioritize some of the amenities she’s become used to at 33 Beekman — like laundry — over a postcard-worthy vista. “As long as I can come home and enjoy myself, it really doesn’t matter to me,” she adds. Even so, Taylor says, “I try to soak it up.”

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"New York Post" featured Lubin economics professor Joseph Salerno in "High NYC housing costs contribute to poorer quality of life"

06/24/2019

"New York Post" featured Lubin economics professor Joseph Salerno in "High NYC housing costs contribute to poorer quality of life"

...Pace University professor of economics Joseph Salerno agreed that a “plethora of regulations” cause New York housing shortages.

“A study has shown that from the mid-1980s to the early 2000s, the average price per square foot of housing was approximately twice the average cost of building an extra foot of housing in New York, due mainly to regulatory regulations,” he said.

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