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New York Times featured Haub Law's Dean Emeritus Richard L. Ottinger's Letter to the editor "The Climate Threat Posed by Plastics"

04/19/2021

New York Times featured Haub Law's Dean Emeritus Richard L. Ottinger's Letter to the editor "The Climate Threat Posed by Plastics"

Richard L. Ottinger
Mamaroneck, N.Y.


The writer is dean emeritus at Pace Law School and a former Democratic congressman from Westchester County.

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The New York Times featured President Marvin Krislov's response to an article about AI in the workforce in "Robots in the Office? Not to Worry"

03/17/2021

The New York Times featured President Marvin Krislov's response to an article about AI in the workforce in "Robots in the Office? Not to Worry"

It is true that as artificial intelligence and machine learning become more widespread, tasks previously thought to require human workers will increasingly be performed by computers. But this is good news for college-educated professionals, not a threat to their livelihoods.

Automation has been spreading for decades, and yet high-skilled workers remain in demand. In higher education, we’ve adapted our curriculums to include training in data analytics and A.I. We give our students the critical thinking skills they need to be lifelong learners, to adapt to changing technologies and changing responsibilities. We know that today’s graduates must be prepared for more skilled, ever-evolving careers, completing higher value assignments.

In short, Phil in accounting will find his degree more valuable, his job higher paid and his workday more interesting, precisely because the robots have taken over the dull parts.

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The New York Times featured President Marvin Krislov's response to an article about AI in the workforce in "Robots in the Office? Not to Worry"

03/17/2021

The New York Times featured President Marvin Krislov's response to an article about AI in the workforce in "Robots in the Office? Not to Worry"

It is true that as artificial intelligence and machine learning become more widespread, tasks previously thought to require human workers will increasingly be performed by computers. But this is good news for college-educated professionals, not a threat to their livelihoods.

Automation has been spreading for decades, and yet high-skilled workers remain in demand. In higher education, we’ve adapted our curriculums to include training in data analytics and A.I. We give our students the critical thinking skills they need to be lifelong learners, to adapt to changing technologies and changing responsibilities. We know that today’s graduates must be prepared for more skilled, ever-evolving careers, completing higher value assignments.

In short, Phil in accounting will find his degree more valuable, his job higher paid and his workday more interesting, precisely because the robots have taken over the dull parts.

Read the full New York Times article.

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New York Times Editorial featured Dyson student Konner Ezra in "Keep the Trains and Buses Running"

01/21/2021

New York Times Editorial featured Dyson student Konner Ezra in "Keep the Trains and Buses Running"

The coronavirus pandemic is jeopardizing the long-term health of the public transit systems that provide a crucial circulatory system for major American cities — particularly for lower-income residents who depend on trains and buses to get to work, the market or the doctor. Konner Ezra, 21, said it’s simple really: Public transit makes it possible for him to live in New York City. If service stops being frequent and reliable, he would leave the city. Mr. Ezra, a psychology student at Pace University, rides the train every weekday to classes or to an internship. He said he worries about his health, and he tries to be careful, wearing a mask and gloves and washing his hands, but he said he has no real alternative.

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The New York Times featured Haub Law Professor Bennett Gershman in "Weinstein's Acquittal on Some Charges May Hamper Appeal of Sex Crimes Conviction"

02/27/2020

The New York Times featured Haub Law Professor Bennett Gershman in "Weinstein's Acquittal on Some Charges May Hamper Appeal of Sex Crimes Conviction"

Bennett Gershman, a professor at Pace Law School in New York, said the Molineux testimony in Weinstein’s trial seemed to have been used simply to strengthen the prosecution’s case, rather than for the limited purpose of proving an element of a crime that the prosecution could not otherwise prove.

He called that a “radical extension of Molineux in New York.”

Evidence of uncharged crimes cannot be used to show a defendant is predisposed or has the propensity to commit a crime. Courts make exceptions, including using such evidence to show a defendant's intent or a signature pattern.

Gershman said David Allweiss's conviction for the 1973 murder of Carol Hoffman in Manhattan was a classic use of Molineux witnesses for a limited purpose -- identifying the killer.

Six women testified that Allweiss told them the same peculiar story that his wife had been raped before he sexually assaulted each victim.

Moments before Hoffman's murder, she called her boyfriend to tell him a strange man had entered her apartment, saying he was looking for his wife's rapist.

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