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Associated Press: "Chipotle Says Employee Worked While Ill at Va. Location"

07/26/2017

Associated Press: "Chipotle Says Employee Worked While Ill at Va. Location"

. . . Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University, noted that the chain will be closely watched and held accountable for any mistakes.

"If somebody gets sick after eating at a Chipotle, they're going to be more likely to think it's Chipotle," he said.

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Chicago Tribune: "Starting line: Career experts offer 2017 grads job-search advice"

05/03/2017

Chicago Tribune: "Starting line: Career experts offer 2017 grads job-search advice"

"Approach the job search like you would dating. It would be strange to have a dating profile that says 'I am willing to date anyone who will date me,' but you would be surprised to see how often students approach the job search saying 'I'll do anything.' Likewise, applying to 200 jobs with the same resume is like sending out a generic message to everyone on a dating site and hoping someone likes you. Instead, get to know more about the organizations you are pursuing, and show a genuine interest in them by building relationships with people who work there."

--Andrea Tider, career counselor, Lubin School of Business, Pace University, New York

"Don't take your mother's advice -- you really do need to talk to strangers. New grads need to realize the importance of building a network. Meeting new people is crucial to finding future job leads. Professional relationships are not just formed at official 'networking events' or conferences. You can uncover job leads in daily life: while volunteering, on line at the grocery store or even in waiting rooms. Talking to strangers and building connections on a regular basis is a key piece to any successful career."

--Bless Vaidian, director, career counseling, Pace University Career Services, New York

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Associated Press: "YouTube ad boycott could spell trouble for Alphabet's Google"

05/01/2017

Associated Press: "YouTube ad boycott could spell trouble for Alphabet's Google"

. . . the fallout from the YouTube boycott is likely to be felt through the rest of this year. Skittish advertisers have curtailed their spending until they are convinced Google can prevent their brands from appearing next to extremist clips promoting hate and violence.

"There is no entity in the world that is more risk averse than a senior marketing person," says Larry Chiagouris, a marketing professor at Pace University in New York. "They don't want to go with a media choice that presents problems for a brand, and they don't have to because they have many other choices."

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Associated Press: "Google targets 'fake news,' offensive search suggestions"

05/01/2017

Associated Press: "Google targets 'fake news,' offensive search suggestions"

. . . If too much misleading information appears in Google's search results, the damage could go beyond harm to its reputation for reliability. It could also spook risk-averse advertisers, who don't want their brands tied to content that can't be trusted, said Larry Chiagouris, a marketing professor at Pace University in New York.

"Fake news is careening out of control in some people's eyes, so advertisers are getting very skittish about it," Chiagouris said. "Anything Google can do to show it is trying to put a lid on it and prevent it from getting out of hand, it will be seen as a good thing."

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Downtown Express: "A cyber-seal from Uncle Sam"

04/07/2017

Downtown Express: "A cyber-seal from Uncle Sam"

Photo: Dr. Jonathan Hill, dean of Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems will be training America’s next generation of cyberwarriors.

The federal government has certified Pace University as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education for a second time, and will continue offering scholarships to budding cyberwarriors through 2022 in exchange for a few years in service to their country.

The students who can expect to be awarded the federal scholarships are interested in more than just making a tidy profit off their cutting-edge skills, but also in waging cyberwar on behalf of their fellow Americans in the front line of the burgeoning digital battlescape, according to school’s primo code slinger.

“These kids are motivated not because it’s a lucrative career field, but because they want to give something back,” said Dr. Jonathan Hill, dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace. “The government is also a great proving ground, and they’re very much on the front lines of this battle.”

Through the federally sponsored cyber security program, Pace will be accepting 12 to 15 students into its Seidenberg School, where they’ll not only receive a firm grounding in computer science, but will also get hands-on experience combating cyber threats, and work hand-in-hand with government agencies such as the National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security.

“We give them a really strong foundation, coupled with specialized training in the latest cyber security technology, encryption, cyber-forensic techniques, and so on, and they will do internships with government agencies to get experience,” said Hill.

The scholarship will pay for tuition, room, and board for between two and three years, and graduates will owe Uncle Sam an equal amount of time in service to the country, either on the city, state, or federal level.

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Associated Press: "Pepsi pulls widely mocked ad"

04/06/2017

Associated Press: "Pepsi pulls widely mocked ad"

. . . Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University, said that the backlash was in part because Pepsi was a couple years "late to the party" with its message about unity, making its ad seem exploitive.

Still, he also noted that the fallout wouldn't necessarily be that damaging, since a lot of the negative sentiment expressed on social media is "easily washed away overnight."

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