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Newsday featured President Krislov's piece "College in the fall?"

07/15/2020

Newsday featured President Krislov's piece "College in the fall?"

As New York continues to reopen and its colleges and universities plan for resuming instruction in the fall, college leaders are grappling with a new worry: Will our students come back?

I believe they will.

I'm an optimist because I know our region has been here before: This century, it has been buffeted by the devastation of 9/11, the inundation after Hurricane Sandy, and the collapse caused by the Great Recession.

Each time, we worried that some of our students wouldn’t return — especially our most vulnerable students, those from low-income families or the first in their families to attend college. We were afraid that they thought they couldn’t afford school, that they worried about their safety, or simply that they thought other things were more important in a time of great disruption.

And each time, they returned. Each time, we’ve gotten them back on track with their education. We know how to do it, and we know what’s at stake if they can’t return.

We’ve long known that a college education, especially for vulnerable students, can transform lives. Americans with a college degree will earn 84% more in their lives than those who attained only a high school diploma, according to research from Georgetown University.

Nowhere has this employment divide been more apparent than during the current pandemic. Today, Americans with a college degree are more likely to be able to work remotely from home and more likely to have jobs that can continue despite lockdown measures. The unemployment rate among those with only a high school diploma shot up to 17% last month; for those with a bachelor’s or higher degree, it’s less than half that, at 8.2%.

Keeping students engaged with their education is good for our students, and it’s good for our society, and our economy, which need these well-educated workers. So how do we do that? At Pace, we’ve learned that outreach matters.

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Newsday featured Pace Haub Law School Professor Bennett Gershman in "Long Island's top prosecutors seek reform after death of George Floyd"

06/18/2020

Newsday featured Pace Haub Law School Professor Bennett Gershman in "Long Island's top prosecutors seek reform after death of George Floyd"

“I applaud these kinds of initiatives. Who wouldn’t?” Pace Law School Professor Bennett Gershman said. “I wonder whether this is a knee-jerk response to a crisis that’s been contaminating our criminal justice system for decades,” he added.

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Newsday featured Setter's offensive lineman Matt Snow in "30 NFL draft hopefuls showed off skills at a virtual pro day"

04/16/2020

Newsday featured Setter's offensive lineman Matt Snow in "30 NFL draft hopefuls showed off skills at a virtual pro day"

Pace University offensive lineman Matt Snow run the 40-yard dash while performance coach Vance Matthews and NFL Draft Bible creator Ric Serritella look on at the university in Martinsville, N.J. Snow was one of 30 NFL draft hopefuls who participated in TEST's virtual pro day hours before Hours before New Jersey closed all gyms indefinitely because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Newsday featured Pace University in "A list of area schools and universities closed over coronavirus concerns"

03/11/2020

Newsday featured Pace University in "A list of area schools and universities closed over coronavirus concerns"

Pace University — All on-campus classes at the school's campuses in lower and midtown Manhattan as well as in Pleasantville are canceled beginning Wednesday, March 11, and replaced by online instruction through March 29, officials said.

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"Newsday" featured Pace alumn Sydney Mesher in "Radio City Rockette Sydney Mesher makes history as troupe's first dancer with visible disability"

12/05/2019

"Newsday" featured Pace alumn Sydney Mesher in "Radio City Rockette Sydney Mesher makes history as troupe's first dancer with visible disability"

“My parents say I started dancing before I could walk,” says Sydney Mesher, 22, who joyfully joined the ranks of the legendary Rockettes this season after her fourth audition in two years.

In the annual Radio City Christmas Spectacular running through Jan. 5, she isn’t just realizing a personal dream come true with every twirl, tap and kick. Mesher is also making hoofer history and strides for inclusivity.

Born without a left hand, the exuberant Pace University graduate from Portland, Oregon, is the first dancer with a visible disability to be hired for the precision dance company founded in 1925. The troupe is famous for its uniformity. Mesher has bent the mold.

...

Dance classes started early for Mesher. As a kid, her parents enrolled her in dance class just for fun. In her performing arts high school, she took classes in jazz, tap, ballet and hip-hop and got “tunnel vision” about dance. “It was something I loved and was good at,” she said. “I decided to do it as a profession.” Studies continued at Pace.

Mesher takes her physical difference — due to symbrachydactyly, a congenital limb-development condition affecting 1 out of 32,000 babies — in stride. “I don’t know anything different,” she said. That goes for whether she’s dancing, working out or donning an elaborate costume, like the reindeer outfit worn in a jolly, jingling number. Costumers have made some alterations where possible to help her with accessibility. In a number where the other dancers ring two handheld bells, Mesher rings one — a modification the audience may not even notice.

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"Newsday" featured Lubin School of Business Professor Bruce Bachenheimer in "Long Beach mattress company's founders regroup — more than once"

06/11/2019

"Newsday" featured Lubin School of Business Professor Bruce Bachenheimer in "Long Beach mattress company's founders regroup — more than once"

...According to Bruce Bachenheimer, a clinical management professor and the executive director of the Entrepreneurship Lab at Pace University, enlisting doctors to drive online sales is not a unique marketing approach. Getroman.com, for instance, connects consumers with its online network’s doctors so that they can purchase pharmaceuticals including Viagra. “For price and convenience, more things are going online,” Bachenheimer said.

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"Newsday" featured Pace University’s Lubin School of Business finance professor Padma Kadiyala in "LI's Broadridge: Wall Street's quiet back office"

03/07/2019

"Newsday" featured Pace University’s Lubin School of Business finance professor Padma Kadiyala in "LI's Broadridge: Wall Street's quiet back office"

Broadridge Financial Solutions Inc. is the  $11.7 billion Long Island business that most people have never heard of even though it touches their lives in myriad ways.

The Lake Success company delivers billions of documents to shareholders each year and processes trillions of dollars in stock trades each day. 

If you've received a proxy statement -- the form asking you to vote your shares to elect a company's board of directors -- it likely came from Broadridge. If you've traded stocks through E*Trade or Raymond James, Broadridge executed your transaction. Your credit card bill may have come from Broadridge, too.

And it all started in the back bedroom of an East Northport house.

Richard J. Daly founded Broadridge's largest division, investor communications, in his then-East Northport home in 1987. He stepped down as CEO Jan. 2, handing the reins to Timothy C. Gokey in  the company's first leadership change since it went public 12 years ago. Daly is now executive chairman.  

A low profile suits Broadridge because it serves as Wall Street’s back office, performing routine but vital work for the biggest stock brokerages and mutual funds. The company dominates the market in two of its core businesses. It runs the board elections for almost every U.S. public company and delivers proxies and other  financial statements to 80 percent of North American households, executives said. Proxy season, the company's busiest time of the year, begins next month. 

“Broadridge plays a very critical role,” said Padma Kadiyala, a finance professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in Pleasantville, in Westchester County.

The fact that they aren’t well-known is their greatest strength because it means people are quite satisfied with the work they are doing,” she said. “The only reason back-office companies are in the news is if they did something wrong, such as reporting something inaccurately.”

Broadridge is Long Island’s second-largest public company by revenue after medical supplies distributor Henry Schein Inc. in Melville. Broadridge reported revenue of $4.3 billion for the 12 months ended June 30, up 5 percent from a year earlier. Profit climbed 31 percent year over year, to $428 million. The company has a stock market value of $11.7 billion.

About 2,300 people work for the company locally, most at several large factories in Edgewood. They are part of a worldwide workforce totaling more than 10,000.

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