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Newsweek featured Dyson Professor Aditi Paul’s research in "Why Dating Apps Are No Way to Find True Love"

02/03/2021

Newsweek featured Dyson Professor Aditi Paul’s research in "Why Dating Apps Are No Way to Find True Love"

Breakup rates are higher too. Aditi Paul, a communications professor at Pace University in New York, analyzed the most comprehensive independent dataset on online and offline dating—Stanford University's "How Couples Meet and Stay Together" survey. In one part of her study, Paul found that relationships involving people who first met in real life lasted four times longer than those of couples who first met online.

Why is it harder to find true love on the apps? Human beings evolved as social animals. We bond through shared experience. It's why jokes always seem funnier with friends than alone. Those shared experiences become part of us—the stories we love to tell and retell to those closest. They become the foundations for deeper emotional connections.

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"Newsweek" featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law distinguished fellow in criminal justice Mimi Rocah in "Trump is implicating Rudy Giuliani in the Ukraine bribery conspiracy"

12/02/2019

"Newsweek" featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law distinguished fellow in criminal justice Mimi Rocah in "Trump is implicating Rudy Giuliani in the Ukraine bribery conspiracy"

"If Trump is going to try to now put this whole Ukraine matter on him, Giuliani seems to be going along with that so far," Mimi Rocah, a former assistant U.S. attorney at the Southern District of New York (SDNY) and a distinguished fellow at Pace University's law school, told MSNBC.

...

"Giuliani is in this very precarious position for a lot of reasons," Rocah said on MSNBC.

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"Newsweek" featured Professor of Law Karl R. Rabago piece "America's Problems with Renewable Energy Can Be Solved by Building Way More Solar and Wind than We Need"

10/10/2019

"Newsweek" featured Professor of Law Karl R. Rabago piece "America's Problems with Renewable Energy Can Be Solved by Building Way More Solar and Wind than We Need"

The famous inventor Edwin Land said, "It's not that we need new ideas, but we need to stop having old ideas." He seemed to be telling us that solutions lie just beyond our old habits of thinking.

Cities, states and countries around the world are committing to clean energy economies that run on very high levels—even 100 percent—of renewable energy. In New York state alone, four competing bills target 50 percent to 100 percent renewables by or before 2040.

 

Realistically, only two renewable energy resources are large enough to meet these very high-penetration objectives on the supply side in the U.S.—solar (by far) and wind.

Both, however, are variable resources, driven by weather as well as daily and seasonal cycles. Therefore, they must be "firmed"—that is, capable of delivery power on demand—in order to replace fossil resources which can be dispatched as needed. Based on our research, we contend that this firm power transformation is not only possible, it is also affordable—if we stop having old ideas.

One entrenched, and very prevalent, idea—likely a result of historically high renewable energy prices—is that all the power generated by renewable resources must be sold as it is generated. The idea of discarding available wind or solar output is anathema, imposed on power producers when production from these sources exceeds what the grid can accept.

This old idea ignores a fundamental proposition: oversizing and proactively curtailing wind and solar. However counterintuitive, a study our colleagues and we conducted shows that these steps are the key to the least expensive path to an electric grid powered largely by solar and wind.

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"Newsweek" featured Lubin's clinical professor of Management Bruce Bachenheimer in "Uber's response to California Worker Bill is Legal Ploy That Denies Drivers Fair Deal"

09/17/2019

"Newsweek" featured Lubin's clinical professor of Management Bruce Bachenheimer in "Uber's response to California Worker Bill is Legal Ploy That Denies Drivers Fair Deal"

Uber's response to a landmark California bill seeking to strengthen benefits for workers in the gig economy is a "legal ploy," labor experts told Newsweek.

On Wednesday, the California Assembly passed AB5, a bill that would force a range of businesses to designate contractors, including ride-share drivers and food delivery workers, as employees and therefore offer them benefits. But ride-sharing company Uber responded to the legislation by claiming it would not reclassify its workers as employees — a move that necessitates claiming that its drivers are not a core component of its business. Lyft told Vox that it also did not plan to reclassify its workers. A Lyft spokesperson told Newsweek "our focus right now is on finding a new path forward and getting a deal done between us, Labor and the Governor."

"Claims that their workers aren't central to their business [are] broadly recognized as a legal ploy rather than an accurate description of their workforce," Erin Hatton, an expert on labor and labor movements at the University of Buffalo, told Newsweek.

The legislation, which Governor Gavin Newsom has said he intends to sign, codifies a test laid out in a California Supreme Court ruling last year. In order for a company to claim that a worker is a contractor, it must prove that the worker is a) free from the control and direction of the hirer b) the worker isn't performing work that is central to the company and c) the worker is engaged in an independently established trade.

Uber, which did not respond to Newsweek prior to publication, has said that it can pass the so-called ABC test to and claim its workers are contractors.

Valerio De Stefano, a professor of labor law at Belgium's University of Leuven, disagreed.

"Being able to decide your own hours is not the final criteria on which you decide whether somebody is an employee or not," de Stefano said. He described what Uber and Lyft are trying to accomplish with their efforts as "schemes that basically circumvent the law" by "using the workers as if they were their employees" — a model he said is "not a fair deal" for contractors.

Other states, including Massachusetts, Virginia and New Jersey, already have some form of ABC law in place, according to the Verge, and de Stefano said that other states would likely follow suit.

While labor advocates have cheered the law, others have raised concerns that it could be damaging to the flexible schedules of contractor work and thereby limit worker freedom. The legislation will likely have wide-ranging impacts, affecting companies far beyond Lyft and Uber, leading some experts to raise questions about how to improve regulation without being overbearing.

"Is clamping down on this hurting progress and the evolution of the market?" Bruce Bachenheimer, a clinical professor of Management at Pace University said to Newsweek.

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"Newsweek" featured Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow Mimi Rocah in "William Barr Accused of Making It Seem Like He Doesn't Oversee Bureau of Prisons after Epstein's Death"

08/14/2019

"Newsweek" featured Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow Mimi Rocah in "William Barr Accused of Making It Seem Like He Doesn't Oversee Bureau of Prisons after Epstein's Death"

Epstein was being held at MCC while he was awaiting trial, and as part of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, the New York facility is overseen by Barr and the Justice Department. Mimi Rocah, a former federal prosecutor for the Southern District of New York, where Epstein was charged with child sex trafficking last month, suggested the attorney general was blurring those lines.

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