main navigation
my pace

Op-Ed | PACE UNIVERSITY

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

New York Law Journal featured Haub Law Professors Bridget J. Crawford and Emily Gold Waldman's piece "Tampons and Pads Should Be Allowed at the Bar Exam"

07/23/2020

New York Law Journal featured Haub Law Professors Bridget J. Crawford and Emily Gold Waldman's piece "Tampons and Pads Should Be Allowed at the Bar Exam"

Bar exam takers around the country are facing unprecedented uncertainty. In less than two weeks, thousands of recent law graduates will sit down in hotel ballrooms, convention centers and large classrooms to take the test that they have been training for three (or more years) to take. With little notice, several states have cancelled the bar exam because of COVID-19 health concerns. Some states like New Jersey and Florida announced an online bar exam in lieu of traditional testing that otherwise would require hundreds or thousands of people to crowd into enclosed spaces for several hours a day over a two-day period. Oregon and Utah canceled their exams and granted a “diploma privilege” to allow law graduates to practice without taking the bar exam. New York axed its test just seven weeks before the big day, with no plans for an alternate test administration. Other states, including those where COVID-19 infection rates continue to rise, are going full-speed ahead with plans to administer in-person tests later this month.

Read the full New York Law Journal article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Hill featured Haub Law Professor David N. Cassuto's co-authored piece "Torturing fewer animals will mean burying fewer people"

07/23/2020

The Hill featured Haub Law Professor David N. Cassuto's co-authored piece "Torturing fewer animals will mean burying fewer people"

COVID-19 has killed hundreds of thousands of people, devastated the global economy and left millions jobless, homeless and hopeless. Like COVID-19, 60 percent of viruses that infect humans and 75 percent of recent infectious diseases are “zoonotic,” meaning they originate in animals. 

We’ve dealt with zoonoses in the past — SARS, avian influenza, HIV, Ebola, West Nile, to name a few. COVID-19, also a zoonotic disease, was not unexpected. As scientists race to develop vaccines for each new zoonotic event, the rest of us might well ask why we keep enabling the spread of these diseases. Avoiding future pandemics is possible but it will require an unprecedented cooperative effort to remake and enforce international animal law.

Zoonotic diseases result from human interaction with animals confined in close, unsanitary conditions. It is fashionable to blame China’s live animal markets, but the reality is far more complex. Live markets are brutally cruel, facilitate trafficking in protected species and encourage unsustainable and unhealthy eating practices. They also form a vast, criminal enterprise built on the illegal trade, slaughter and suffering of wild and endangered animals. 

Read the full Hill article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Newsday featured President Krislov's piece "College in the fall?"

07/15/2020

Newsday featured President Krislov's piece "College in the fall?"

As New York continues to reopen and its colleges and universities plan for resuming instruction in the fall, college leaders are grappling with a new worry: Will our students come back?

I believe they will.

I'm an optimist because I know our region has been here before: This century, it has been buffeted by the devastation of 9/11, the inundation after Hurricane Sandy, and the collapse caused by the Great Recession.

Each time, we worried that some of our students wouldn’t return — especially our most vulnerable students, those from low-income families or the first in their families to attend college. We were afraid that they thought they couldn’t afford school, that they worried about their safety, or simply that they thought other things were more important in a time of great disruption.

And each time, they returned. Each time, we’ve gotten them back on track with their education. We know how to do it, and we know what’s at stake if they can’t return.

We’ve long known that a college education, especially for vulnerable students, can transform lives. Americans with a college degree will earn 84% more in their lives than those who attained only a high school diploma, according to research from Georgetown University.

Nowhere has this employment divide been more apparent than during the current pandemic. Today, Americans with a college degree are more likely to be able to work remotely from home and more likely to have jobs that can continue despite lockdown measures. The unemployment rate among those with only a high school diploma shot up to 17% last month; for those with a bachelor’s or higher degree, it’s less than half that, at 8.2%.

Keeping students engaged with their education is good for our students, and it’s good for our society, and our economy, which need these well-educated workers. So how do we do that? At Pace, we’ve learned that outreach matters.

Read the full Newsday article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

USA Today Network featured President Marvin Krislov's piece "Yes, college in the United States is still worth it — and very much so | Opinion"

06/03/2020

USA Today Network featured President Marvin Krislov's piece "Yes, college in the United States is still worth it — and very much so | Opinion"

As America begins to reopen after the COVID-19 lockdown and colleges and universities map out plans for a fall semester that includes socially-distant classrooms, masked dining halls and online options for in-person classes, there’s a growing chorus suggesting that this is the time for incoming or even continuing students to take a year off. College in these conditions isn’t worth it, these skeptics say, and students would get more value from a year of other pursuits.

I disagree.

If anything, the last few months have shown just how critical college is for economic success, especially for those vulnerable students whose lives are most transformed by college.

I know; it’s my job to say that. But it’s also true.

We’ve long known that a college education improves a person’s chances in life. Americans with a college degree will earn 84% more in their lives than those who attained only a high school diploma, according to research from Georgetown University. 

The pandemic has laid bare the advantages that accrue to college graduates. Today, Americans with a college degree are more likely to be able to work from home and more likely to have jobs that can continue despite lockdown measures. The unemployment rate among those with only a high school diploma shot up to 17% last month; for those with a bachelor’s or higher degree, it’s less than half that, at 8.2%. Some 39% of those with a household income under $40,000 lost work, compared to 13% of those in households earning more than $100,000.

College is key to the American dream. A college education opens the doors to new areas of knowledge, to mentors and guides, and to new friends and connections. Those advantages of college are invaluable, especially for those who don’t come from backgrounds that automatically provide those mentors and connections.

Read the full USA Today Network article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Crain's" featured President Marvin Krislov's piece "Opportunity zones should deliver more than profit and tax breaks"

05/29/2019

"Crain's" featured President Marvin Krislov's piece "Opportunity zones should deliver more than profit and tax breaks"

Opportunity zones are a new incentive to direct investment capital into underserved communities that need it. They were created by the federal Tax Cut and Jobs Act of 2017, and 514 census tracts throughout the state have been designated as such by Gov. Andrew Cuomo. All five boroughs of New York City have them, including parts of Chinatown and Harlem and large swaths of the Bronx.

In Queens, waterfront areas such as Long Island City and Astoria are opportunity zones, as are Downtown Brooklyn and parts of South Brooklyn and areas around the ferry terminal and Bayonne Bridge on Staten Island.

Across the country, thousands of communities in or near an opportunity zone could be embarking upon one of the most profound experimental economic programs in generations. Structured correctly, opportunity zone investments can direct billions dollars in private investment toward the kind of new development, skills training and infrastructure upgrades these communities so badly need.

That’s why it’s critical that qualified opportunity funds guiding these investments—the pools of investable money collected and invested in opportunity zone businesses and projects—screen potential projects for their community benefits, not just their potential economic returns.

What might a community benefit screen look like?

Qualified opportunity funds should work with community leaders and longtime community pillars like universities and health centers to connect investors with worthy projects that will yield a positive social impact. They should focus on resource-starved infrastructure projects that benefit local and regional economic ecosystems. And they must avoid projects that increase inequality or drive out longtime residents.

Last summer, for example, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York joined with the U.S. Impact Investing Alliance and the Beeck Center for Social Impact and Innovation to develop a formal framework for evaluating potential investments. The principles they outlined include community engagement, equitable community benefits, transparency and measurement so that progress on objectives can be tracked and improved upon.

We would also add other considerations, focused on outcomes:

* Does an investment help locals? Residents of low-income communities often need affordable housing, good jobs, skills training, access to health care and other social services. This must form the basis of projects selected for investment.

* Does an investment build sustainable and resilient infrastructure? This question is often ignored when the time horizon of a project is long. But because an investor must hold an opportunity zone investment for 10 years to reap the maximum tax benefits, we anticipate a shift to longer-term planning.

* Does an investment build intellectual capital? Our country faces big challenges, from the impacts of climate change to employment in the digital age to income inequality. Low-income communities are in many ways least equipped to confront these changes. The opportunity zone program provides a remarkable chance to invest resources that help residents in these areas gain the expertise to adapt.

Critical moments in American history have called for bold action to solve seemingly intractable problems. Opportunity zones can be the kind of transformative program that changes this country for the better while also benefiting investors. What’s needed is a mechanism to ensure it delivers the intended societal gains alongside financial ones. As funding flows into the zones, investors must implement a framework that achieves both investment security and community growth.

The tax law created powerful incentives for investment in underserved communities. The needs are there. It falls to all of us to make sure they are met.

Marvin Krislov is president of Pace University. Al Puchala is CEO of CapZone Impact Investments, a national platform focused on opportunity zone investments.

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Daily Voice Plus" featured Pace University's President Marvin Krislov's piece "Keeping Pace: Job readiness is Pace University’s mission"

05/16/2019

"Daily Voice Plus" featured Pace University's President Marvin Krislov's piece "Keeping Pace: Job readiness is Pace University’s mission"

For more than 100 years, Pace University has been dedicated to providing a hands-on, real-world education grounded in the liberal arts that prepares graduates for great jobs and great careers. We give our students a great education and we give Westchester employers graduates ready to meet their needs.

We have a long tradition of training businesspeople and communications experts, teachers and counselors, public and nonprofit leaders. Our Elisabeth Haub School of Law, which has trained a generation of Westchester lawyers, serves the community through our legal clinics — and is now the top-ranked environmental law program in the country. With plans well underway for the new North 60 project, we’re making sure we’re also educating a new generation of Westchester biotech workers. The $1.2 billion plan, which kicked off earlier this year, will bring our region 222,000 square feet of lab and office space for biotech and medical use in a new biosciences center that is projected to create 8,000 permanent new jobs.

To meet that need, we’re redoubling our offerings in the bioscience sector. We see that as encompassing three distinct but related areas: health care, technology and the life sciences.

LIFE SCIENCES
The New York metropolitan area is the most significant bioscience region in the world. The area hosts more than 60 percent of all Big Pharma national or global headquarters, with more than 75,000 biotech jobs. The New York-New Jersey region is the second-ranked in the nation for research funding from the National Institutes for Health, with 4,200 awards totaling $2.1 billion. And Gov. Andrew Cuomo is pushing several initiatives to grow the life sciences sector in New York state.

Innovation in the life sciences happens at the intersection of our College of Health Professions and our Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. And it gets a big boost from a number of programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, which houses our Biology, Chemistry and Physical Sciences departments and the Institute for Sustainability and the Environment. Life science employers need the marketers, administrators and finance experts we educate in our Lubin School of Business. We send students on to jobs at major regional employers including Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Abbott Laboratories.

HEALTH CARE
Our College of Health Professions has long been a leader in health care education in Westchester. We’re a Center of Excellence in Healthcare Simulation. And we’re adding new programs to respond to employer demand, like a new master’s in occupational therapy and the region’s only master’s in nutrition and dietetics that allows students to complete their clinical work at the same time they complete their classroom instruction.

Undergraduate CHP students complete dozens of clinical experiences in hospitals and hospital systems including NewYork-Presbyterian, Montefiore, Westchester Medical Center and Phelps Memorial. Master’s students complete clinicals at those same systems, plus Memorial Sloan Kettering and White Plains hospitals.

CHP’s programs are highly rated and job-placement rates are well above national averages. Last year we placed graduates in all of those hospitals and hospital systems plus many more throughout the region.

TECHNOLOGY
Our Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems nearly tripled its student body over the last five years as we respond to the demands of the tech sector in Westchester and across the region. We’re designated as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education by the National Security Agency and Department of Homeland Security. Our cybersecurity graduates go on to public-sector jobs at the FBI, NSA and organizations in Westchester.

We’re also adding new programs at Seidenberg. We added new courses in design thinking so our students are best prepared to innovate. We launched an interdisciplinary eco-lab on the Hudson River in Ossining. Our students are working on the programming and robotics that allow water-quality testing and monitoring.

Seidenberg graduates go to jobs in data science, web design, software development, network engineering and so many other fields at everything from local startups to major employers like IBM, KPMG and Consumer Reports.

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"The Journal News" featured Pace University’s College of Health Professions PhD Nursing program student A’Isha G. Harper's piece "Who lies to their doctor? Just about everyone, including this Peekskill nurse"

01/08/2019

"The Journal News" featured Pace University’s College of Health Professions PhD Nursing program student A’Isha G. Harper's piece "Who lies to their doctor? Just about everyone, including this Peekskill nurse"

The writer, a Peekskill resident, is a nurse with a master’s degree in public health. Harper is pursuing a PhD in Nursing Research at Pace University’s College of Health Professions in Pleasantville.

I recently read that about 81 percent of patients lie to their physicians.

That was according to an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association that detailed responses of two national online surveys by 4,510 adult participants in the U.S. The surveys asked about diet, exercise, taking medications as prescribed, taking someone else’s medications, and understanding physician instructions. Many of the participants confessed to withholding information in at least one of these areas. 

As a nurse I was appalled and shocked. Clutch your pearls, really, who does that? Well…  

The reason this story caught my attention? I had just completed my annual checkup. 

I really have a great relationship with my primary care physician. Last year she told me I needed to try to lose at least 20 pounds. Our agreement was I would do that by my next annual checkup. I made it to 4 pounds. We had that very polite “what happened to our plan” conversation. She was not judgmental in the least, truthfully. She was very encouraging and supportive. I know she genuinely wants me to be healthier, or just slightly healthy. We reviewed what I had done over the past year: 

*I told her I was seeing a nutritionist. Actually, I made the appointment twice and have not quite made it to the office.

*I told her I was exercising and trying to make it a routine. What I really did was find a portable treadmill which I hope to purchase soon. Who walks in the cold?  (We should forget the fact that we have gone through four seasons since my last annual checkup.) 

*We discussed my diet, which has improved slightly. I no longer cook, I just eat out daily. And I downloaded and joined Weight Watchers, now known as WW. I joined because Oprah told me it would help me lose weight. It turns out you are instructed to open and use the app daily. You also must be honest when using the app.   

I could have just as easily told her I really had not followed through with many of the plans. Instead, I too withheld valuable information. 

Why are we not being honest with our primary care providers? Some of the reasons participants gave for not telling their providers the truth includes: Not agreeing with the clinician’s recommendations, not understanding the instructions provided by the clinician, not wanting to be judged, being embarrassed, and not wanting to hear their behavior might be harmful. 

Although I am making light of my visit, it is concerning that patients are not providing complete medical histories to their physicians. I cannot emphasize enough the importance of being transparent and providing accurate and complete information when speaking with your physician.

There are many reasons you should tell your provider (this can be your physician, physician assistant, or nurse) the truth:

*By not providing complete and accurate information to your health care provider, you limit the ability to properly coordinate care for you. Your provider will make the best decision for you based on the information. 

*An honest dialogue between patients and providers creates a safe environment and builds a trusting relationship. Your provider does not want to hear, “can I be honest with you,” they assume you have been honest with them.  We are in a fast-paced health-care environment, but most providers will take time to get to know you and listen to your concerns.  

*And finally, it will likely make reaching your health-care goals possible.   

Now I was wondering if I should call my doctor and tell her I was not perfectly honest with her, but I realized she knows. That recent study published in JAMA is not the first to address patient honesty. It is conventional wisdom that providers are skeptical about the information we provide. If a patient reports drinking two beers per day, the provider pretty much assumes it is likely four beers. If we say we exercise four times a week, it is probably closer to two times. 

I did not call my doctor. Instead, I started to put real plans in place. I did schedule my nutrition appointment and it turns out the first visit is free. I opened the WW app last night. There are recipes and rewards on the app. I still have not figured out who is cooking these healthy meals but it is a work in progress.

I was going to join the gym again but I know I will not go. I recently heard a doctor say we all think we need to join a gym to exercise, as if we have forgotten how to walk. I am going to start my walks this week. Wave if you pass me or ask me if I need a ride.

Read the article.