main navigation
my pace

Op-Ed | PACE UNIVERSITY

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Hechinger Report featured President Marvin Krislov teaming up with Stelios Vassilakis, chief programs and strategic initiatives officer at the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, on the op-ed "OPINION: How targeted internships are helping students and nonpr

04/22/2021

The Hechinger Report featured President Marvin Krislov teaming up with Stelios Vassilakis, chief programs and strategic initiatives officer at the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, on the op-ed "OPINION: How targeted internships are helping students and nonprofits get through the pandemic"

When the coronavirus reached America a year ago, it upended everything about how we live and work. For college students, it meant a quick shift to online classes and shuttered residence halls. It meant virtual commencements and canceled plans.

For many students, it also meant canceled internship opportunities. And that was a bigger problem than you might realize.

Internships can play as critical a role in a student’s educational and career success as their academic coursework, providing crucial opportunities to learn by doing and gain professional experience.

Perhaps even more importantly — especially for students from historically underrepresented groups — internships help build professional networks that can support them throughout their careers.

In addition, students overwhelmingly report that internships help them focus their career goals, national research shows. Paying internships often provide much-needed income that helps make college possible.

Read the full Hechinger Report article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The Journal News featured executive director of Pace’s Energy and Climate Center Craig Hart in the op-ed "Earth Day: To achieve our clean energy goals, the private sector must commit | Opinion"

04/21/2021

The Journal News featured executive director of Pace’s Energy and Climate Center Craig Hart in the op-ed "Earth Day: To achieve our clean energy goals, the private sector must commit | Opinion"

The first Earth Day was April 22, 1970.  Considered a marker for the modern environmental movement, it was born of a bipartisan effort between a Democratic Senator from Wisconsin, a Republican Congressman from California and a small cohort of student activists. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency did not yet exist.  Neither did any of the laws or international treaties that now make up the canon of environmental protection. Craig Hart is the executive director of the Pace University Energy and Climate Center.  Michael N. Romita is the president and CEO of the Westchester County Association and a former environmental litigator with the U.S. Dept. of Justice.

Read the full Journal News article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Police 1 featured Dyson Professor Darrin Porcher's op-ed "Why agencies should take advantage of Guardian's National Applicant Information Center"

04/20/2021

Police 1 featured Dyson Professor Darrin Porcher's op-ed "Why agencies should take advantage of Guardian's National Applicant Information Center"

An op-ed written by Dr. Darrin Porcher. Dr. Darrin Porcher retired from the New York City Police Department as a lieutenant after 20 years of service. He is a criminal justice expert witness and consultant. He earned his doctoral degree from Fordham University, holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Organizational Management from St. Joseph's College and a Masters of Public Administration from Marist College. He also served as an officer in the United States Army Reserve. Dr. Porcher also teaches criminal justice at Pace University and frequently appears on national television as an expert contributor to criminal justice discussions on Fox, CourtTV and other media outlets.

Imagine you're a background investigator and you're reviewing the personal history questionnaire (PHQ) of a new applicant. Little do you know, this same applicant submitted their information to an agency right next door a month ago. And, they were not eligible for hire due to disqualifying information contained in their PHQ. 

Now imagine that the applicant removed the disqualifying information prior to submitting their PHQ to you. How would you know? 

In most instances, you wouldn't, but it doesn't have to be this way anymore.

Protecting the integrity of law enforcement

Historically, in most instances, the only way background investigators knew that an applicant had applied at another agency was if the applicant disclosed it to them. Although such disclosure is required by many agencies, it's dependent on the honor and integrity of the applicant to disclose it. If an applicant is willing to falsify information on their PHQ to get hired, then are they really likely to be honest about whether they've applied elsewhere?  

It has been this way for decades, and it is part of the reason that bad apples find their way into law enforcement, despite the diligence of the best investigators in the profession. Living with the risk that one of these applicants will eventually do something that harms the community they serve reflects poorly on the profession and is unacceptable. 

Read the full Police 1 article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Westchester and Fairfield County Business Journal featured Haub Law Professor Katrina Kuh's co-authored op-ed with Haub Law graduate Maya Van Rossu "For businesses, Green Amendment is double green"

04/20/2021

Westchester and Fairfield County Business Journal featured Haub Law Professor Katrina Kuh's co-authored op-ed with Haub Law graduate Maya Van Rossu "For businesses, Green Amendment is double green"

In April 2019 and again in early 2021, the New York State Assembly and the New York State Senate passed legislation to place a constitutional amendment measure, the Green Amendment, on the ballot in November 2021. Voters will be asked whether to amend the New York State Constitution to provide in Section 19, Article I: “Environmental rights. Each person shall have a right to clean air and water, and a healthful environment.”

As occupants of the state, New York businesses will benefit from passage of the amendment. The Green Amendment could benefit businesses by reducing litigation risk, improving the overall resilience and health of communities and fostering conditions that support the development of forward-looking green industries in New York. Additionally, businesses who advocate for adoption of the Green Amendment can, in doing so, communicate their commitment to a sustainable future to their customers, employees and local communities. For businesses, the Green Amendment is double green – good for the environment and good for the bottom line.

The Green Amendment can reduce litigation risk by preventing situations where businesses inadvertently cause or contribute to environmental damages that might later become the basis for an action seeking damages under existing tort, nuisance or other law because existing statutes and regulations are not adequately protective. Consistent with the interpretation of similar constitutional provisions in New York, the Green Amendment would likely not be enforceable directly against private parties; it is instead a limitation on government action.

Read the full Westchester and Fairfield County Business Journal article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

The USA TODAY Network featured President Marvin Krislov teaming up with Westchester Community College President Belinda Miles in their op ed "Far too many students earn credits without completing a degree: Here’s how to change that"

04/20/2021

The USA TODAY Network featured President Marvin Krislov teaming up with Westchester Community College President Belinda Miles in their op ed "Far too many students earn credits without completing a degree: Here’s how to change that"

By Marvin Krislov and Belinda Miles: 

Today’s college students are not who you think they are.

One-third of them are more than 25 years old, according to data released last summer by Higher Learning Advocates, a nonprofit supporting student success. Nearly two in five are part-time students, that report said, and only about one in six live on campus.

What’s more, nearly 40% of today’s undergraduates are enrolled at two-year community colleges, according to the report. Some 35% will transfer to at least one different institution during their college career. About 20% are parents.

At the same time, the pandemic has caused college students to delay completing their degrees. The Strada Education Network has found that one in four college students are considering delaying graduation. And, worryingly, some 36 million Americans not currently enrolled in college have some credits but no degree, according to data from the National College Attainment Network.

For the most part, college today is no longer a four-year residential experience for a group of young people recently graduated from high school. Instead, it’s a wide-open, diverse, and dynamic landscape. And the more we embrace that reality, the more we can give today’s students the support they need to earn their college degrees.

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed